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Informação e Conhecimento para a Saúde

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Resultados 1 - 20 de 560
1.

Evaluación de la recolección domiciliaria realizada por un banco de leche humana de un hospital universitario de Brasil. / [Evaluation of home collection performed by a human milk bank in a university hospital in Brazil].

Salud Publica Mex; 56(3): 245-50, 2014 May-Jun.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25272175

Resumo

OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of procedures during household milking and transport of human milk associated with their quality control. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 48 donors registered in the Human Milk Bank of the Clinics Hospital of the Federal University at Uberlândia. Observations were made during home visits. A checklist was elaborated according to the technical standards for human milk banks, been associated with physical-chemical, and microbiological controls. The chi-square test, logistic regression and Spearman test (p< 0.05) were used for data analysis. RESULTS: The results suggest that most donors assimilated the guidelines of the milk bank staff and procedures were satisfactorily performed. CONCLUSION: It could be demonstrated that milking and home collection are safe and effective ways for obtaining donated human milk.
2.

Banked preterm versus banked term human milk to promote growth and development in very low birth weight infants.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev; (6): CD007644, 2010 Jun 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20556782

Resumo

BACKGROUND: Human milk banking has been available in many countries for the last three decades. The milk provided from milk banking is predominantly term breast milk, but some milk banks provide preterm breast milk. There are a number of differences between donor term and donor preterm human milk. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of banked preterm milk compared with banked term milk regarding growth and developmental outcome in very low birth weight infants (infants weighing less than 1500 g). SEARCH STRATEGY: We used the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group, including a search of the Cochrane Neonatal Group specialized register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, January 2010). We searched the computerised bibliographic databases MEDLINE (1966 to February 2010), EMBASE (1988 to February 2010) and Web of Science (1975 to February 2010). We searched reference lists of all selected articles, review articles and the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials. We also searched abstracts from neonatal and pediatric meetings (PAS electronic version from 2000 to 2009, ESPR hand search from 2000 to 2009). We applied no language restrictions. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing banked donor preterm milk with banked donor term milk regarding growth and developmental outcomes in very low birth weight infants DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We planned to perform assessment of methodology regarding blinding of randomisation, intervention and outcome measurements as well as completeness of follow-up. We planned to evaluate treatment effect using a fixed-effect model using relative risk (RR), relative risk reduction, risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat (NNT) for categorical data and using mean, standard deviation and weighted mean difference (WMD) for continuous data. We planned an evaluation of heterogeneity. MAIN RESULTS: No studies met the inclusion criteria. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There are no randomised trials that compare preterm banked milk to banked term milk to promote growth and development in very low birth weight infants.
3.

Breast milk donation and social support: reports of women donors.

Rev Lat Am Enfermagem; 18(3): 381-9, 2010 May-Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20721427

Resumo

The study aimed to characterize the behavior of human milk donation and to describe the informal social and formal institutional support, according to reports from women donors. It is an exploratory, cross-sectional, descriptive study using domicile interviews based on structured and semi-structured scripts. The participants were 36 women enrolled in two human milk banks of the public health system of the Federal District. Statistical analysis of quantitative data and categorical content analysis of qualitative data were performed. Categories of reasons that most influenced the frequency of expressing were: food, time availability, negative emotions and fluid intake. The manual expressing technique was reported as predominant. The use of breast shells was cited by almost a third of the donors. Most frequent suggestions for improving institutional support were more attention and support from the milk banks for the donor. The study may serve as a stimulus for the implementation of technical and political strategies to encourage this practice.
6.

Recent actuality about Bacillus cereus and human milk bank: a new sensitive method for microbiological analysis of pasteurized milk.

Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis; 37(7): 1297-1303, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29725957

Resumo

Three cases of Bacillus cereus infection or colonization occurred in the same region in France, and milk from the milk bank was suspected as a possible common source of contamination. All Batches delivered to the three cases complied with the requirements of the bacteriological reference method recommended by good practices guidelines. Still, a retrospective analysis with a more sensitive method showed one batch to contain B. cereus, however straincomparison revealed no epidemiological link betweenisolates from patients and those from the milk. Consequently, in accordance with the precautionary principle, we developed a new sensitive method for the screening of pasteurized milk for pathogenic bacteria. From January 1 to August 31, 2017, 2526 samples of pasteurized milk were prospectively included in the study. We showed that a 20 mL sample of pasteurized milk incubated for 18 h at 37 °C under aerobic conditions was favoring the detection of B. Cereus. The nonconformity rate was 6.3% for the reference method and 12.6% for the improved method (p < 0.0001). Nonconformity was due to the presence of B. cereus in 88.5% of cases for the improved method and 53% of cases for the reference method (p < 0.0001). Thus our new method is improves the microbiological safety of the product distributed and only moderately increases the rate of bacteriological nonconformity .
7.

Room for improvement in breast milk feeding after very preterm birth in Europe: Results from the EPICE cohort.

Matern Child Nutr; 14(1)2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28714111

Resumo

Breast milk feeding (BMF) is associated with lower neonatal morbidity in the very preterm infant (<32 weeks gestation) and breastfeeding is beneficial for maternal health. Previous studies show large variations in BMF after very preterm birth and recognize the need for targeted breastfeeding support in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU). In a European collaboration project about evidence-based practices after very preterm birth, we examined the association between maternal, obstetric, and infant clinical factors; neonatal and maternal care unit policies; and BMF at discharge from the NICU. In multivariable analyses, covariates associated with feeding at discharge were first investigated as predictors of any BMF and in further analysis as predictors of exclusive or partial BMF. Overall, 58% (3,826/6,592) of the infants received any BMF at discharge, but there were large variations between regions (range 36-80%). Primiparity, administration of antenatal corticosteroids, first enteral feed <24 hr after birth, and mother's own milk at first enteral feed were predictors positively associated with any BMF at discharge. Vaginal delivery, singleton birth, and receiving mother's own milk at first enteral feed were associated with exclusive BMF at discharge. Units with a Baby Friendly Hospital accreditation improved any BMF at discharge; units with protocols for BMF and units using donor milk had higher rates of exclusive BMF at discharge. This study suggests that there is a high potential for improving BMF through policies and support in the NICU.
8.

Genomics of lactation: role of nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics in the fatty acid composition of human milk.

Br J Nutr; 118(3): 161-168, 2017 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28831952

Resumo

Human milk covers the infant's nutrient requirements during the first 6 months of life. The composition of human milk progressively changes during lactation and it is influenced by maternal nutritional factors. Nowadays, it is well known that nutrients have the ability to interact with genes and modulate molecular mechanisms impacting physiological functions. This has led to a growing interest among researchers in exploring nutrition at a molecular level and to the development of two fields of study: nutrigenomics, which evaluates the influence of nutrients on gene expression, and nutrigenetics, which evaluates the heterogeneous individual response to nutrients due to genetic variation. Fatty acids are one of the nutrients most studied in relation to lactation given their biologically important roles during early postnatal life. Fatty acids modulate transcription factors involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism, which in turn causes a variation in the proportion of lipids in milk. This review focuses on understanding, on the one hand, the gene transcription mechanisms activated by maternal dietary fatty acids and, on the other hand, the interaction between dietary fatty acids and genetic variation in genes involved in lipid metabolism. Both of these mechanisms affect the fatty acid composition of human milk.
9.

Human Milk Processing: A Systematic Review of Innovative Techniques to Ensure the Safety and Quality of Donor Milk.

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr; 64(3): 353-361, 2017 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27755345

Resumo

Pasteurization, performed at 62.5°C for 30 minutes (holder pasteurization), is currently recommended in all international human milk banks guidelines, but it affects some human milk bioactive and nutritive components. The present systematic review is aimed at critically reviewing evidence on the suitability of human milk processing techniques other than holder pasteurization, both thermal and nonthermal, to ensure microbiological safety, and on the effects of these techniques on biologically active donor milk components. A systematic review of English and non-English articles using Medline, PubMed, Embase, SCOPUS, and CAB Abstracts, with no restriction in publication date was performed. Search terms included: human, breast, donor, or banked milk, breastmilk, breast fed, breastfed, breastfeed; HTST, Flash, High Pressure, UV, ultrasonic or nonthermal; process, pasteuris, pasteuriz. Only primary research articles published in peer-reviewed journals were included, providing or not a comparison with holder pasteurized human milk, provided that the pasteurization technique was clearly described, and not intended for domestic use. Additional studies were identified by searching bibliographies of relevant articles. Twenty-six studies were identified as being relevant. Two examined both High Pressure Processing and High-Temperature-Short-Time pasteurization; 10 only examined High Pressure Processing; 10 only examined High-Temperature-Short-Time; 2 articles examined ultraviolet irradiation; 2 articles examined (thermo-)ultrasonic processing. The results indicate that data about safety for microbiological control are still scarce for most of the novel technologies, and that consensus on processing conditions is necessary for nonthermal technologies, before any conclusions on the qualitative and nutritional advantages of these techniques can be drawn.
10.

Stability of Cortisol and Cortisone in Human Breast Milk During Holder Pasteurization.

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr; 65(6): 658-660, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28691975

Resumo

Human donor milk is the feeding of choice for preterm infants, when own mother's milk is not available. Holder pasteurization is necessary to secure the safety of donor milk, although it can affect milk quality by reduction of nutritional and bioactive components. Recently, research has focused on the potential role of breast milk glucocorticoids for infant development. At this moment, it is unknown whether pasteurization affects milk glucocorticoid levels. Therefore, we assessed whether Holder pasteurization, the most frequently used method nowadays, reduces breast milk cortisol and cortisone levels, using breast milk samples from 30 women who delivered at term. We found tight correlations between pre- and postpasteurization levels of cortisol (R = 0.99) and cortisone (R = 0.98), and good agreement in Passing and Bablok regression analysis. In conclusion, cortisol and cortisone in human term breast milk are not significantly affected by Holder pasteurization.
11.

A longitudinal study of human milk composition in the second year postpartum: implications for human milk banking.

Matern Child Nutr; 13(1)2017 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26776058

Resumo

While the composition of human milk has been studied extensively in the first year of lactation, there is a paucity of data regarding human milk composition beyond one year postpartum. Policies vary at milk banks around the world regarding how long lactating women are eligible to donate their milk. The primary purpose of this study is to describe longitudinal changes in human milk composition in the second year postpartum to support the development of evidence based guidelines regarding how long lactating women can donate human milk to a milk bank. Nineteen lactating women in North Carolina provided monthly milk samples from 11 months to 17 months postpartum (N = 131), and two non-profit milk banks provided (N = 33) pooled, unpasteurized milk samples from 51 approved donors less than one year postpartum. There was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the concentration of total protein, lactoferrin, lysozyme, Immunoglobulin A, oligosaccharides and sodium in longitudinal samples of mother's milk between 11 and 17 months postpartum, while zinc and calcium concentrations declined, and no changes were observed in lactose, fat, iron and potassium. Human milk in the second year postpartum contained significantly higher concentrations of total protein, lactoferrin, lysozyme and Immunoglobulin A, than milk bank samples, and significantly lower concentrations of zinc, calcium, iron and oligosaccharides. Accepting milk bank donations beyond one year postpartum is a potential strategy for increasing the supply of donor milk, but may require mineral fortification.
12.

Enhancing Children's Safety by Barcoding Implementation at Breast Milk Feeding.

Stud Health Technol Inform; 245: 49-53, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29295050

Resumo

When newborns remain hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit, they are often unable to feed themselves and receive human milk through enteral nutrition devices such as orogastric or nasogastric probes. Therefore, the Nursing staff is responsible for the fractionation, storage and administration of human milk. Breast milk has a great biological complexity being the optimal food for the baby to provide all the nutrients needed. At the same time, it is a bodily fluid that carries the risk of disease transmission if not administered properly. Patient safety should be a priority in healthcare, and health information technologies could be used to avoid preventable adverse events. Barcoding technology has the ability to accurately verify patient identity and prescription accuracy before milk administration. This paper describes the steps followed to implement breast milk barcoding technology in an academic tertiary hospital.
13.

Integration of Health Information Systems Using HL7: A Case Study.

Stud Health Technol Inform; 234: 188-194, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28186039

Resumo

Interoperability is a prerequisite for health information systems (HIS) that will reduce waste of unnecessary costs, errors, delays, and futile repetition. Many previous studies had proposed different approaches in the attempt to solve interoperability challenges. In this paper, we report our experiences in using Health Level 7 (HL7) standard and adopting the Common Gateway Model for exchanging heath data. The benefits and challenges of using standards for data interoperability are also described.
14.

Characteristics of the regional human milk bank in Poland - donors, recipients and nutritional value of human milk

Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig; 68(4): 395-400, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29280369

Resumo

Background: In case of shortage of breast milk despite proper lactation care or the poor state of the mother's health, breast milk from human milk bank is recommended for feeding preterm infants Objective: This study retrospectively evaluated the first year of the operation of the Regional Human Milk Bank Material and methods: Data concerning donors was collected in the human milk bank during the cooperation. The clinical characteristics of the recipients was made on the basis of medical documentation from the Holy Family Hospital in Warsaw, Poland. Analysis of nutritional value was performed with the human milk analyzer (MIRIS AB) Results: In the first year of activity, 45 voluntary donors established cooperation, donating from 650 to 32030 ml of human milk. The content of nutrients in milk provided by donors was variable - protein 0.4-1.5 g / 100 ml, fat 1.1-7.4 g / 100 ml, carbohydrates 6.3-7.9 g / 100 ml. The average length of using donated human milk was 4 days and the average volume of milk for one infant was 282 ml Conclusions: The donor profiles have a significant impact on the milk composition form HMB. The nutritional value can be improved by recruitment donors from mothers that gave birth prematurely and by beginning donation at earlier stages of lactation as soon as lactation is stabilized. In case of shortage of mothers own milk the immediate implementation of donors milk as a short-term support can significantly reduce the food intolerance incidence in the group of prematurely born infants
15.

O diálogo entre saúde e política externa na cooperação brasileira em bancos de leite humano. / The dialog between health and foreign policy in Brazilian cooperation in human milk banks.

Cien Saude Colet; 22(7): 2277-2286, 2017 Jul.
Artigo em Português, Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28724009

Resumo

Mother's milk is the primary source of nourishment in early infancy. When this source is unavailable, secondary sources may be used, such as human milk banks. The first milk bank in Brazil was created in 1943, and they have been used ever since. A national model was developed through a number of phases, culminating in the Brazilian Network of Human Milk Banks. This gave rise to a number of international cooperation projects, with the Brazilian model particularly relevant for developing nations. The main objective of this analysis is to understand what drives Brazil to promote milk banks internationally. To do this we tried to understand the relationship between health and foreign policy, expressed here as soft power, as here the two areas dialog with one another. The results include gains in both areas and the affirmation of health as a central goal of the national interest cluster of the case.
16.

Práticas educativas segundo os "Dez passos para o sucesso do aleitamento materno" em um Banco de Leite Humano. / [Educational practices in accordance with the "Ten steps to successful breastfeeding" in a Human Milk Bank].

Cien Saude Colet; 22(5): 1661-1671, 2017 May.
Artigo em Português | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28538935

Resumo

This article sought to evaluate educational practices in line with the "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding" in a Human Milk Bank. It involved a retrospective study using sociodemographic data about the pregnancy and the baby, obtained from a nursing mothers care protocol (2009-2012). These data were associated to steps related to educational practices from the "Ten Steps." Descriptive analysis, chi-square test and Poisson regression were performed. 12,283 mothers, with a median of 29 (12-54) years old, were evaluated. The guidelines about breastfeeding received during prenatal care (step 3) prevailed among mothers aged 30-39 years and the skin to skin contact (step 4) prevailed among oriented mothers. Breastfeeding training (step 5) predominated among those who breastfed exclusively. Higher prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (step 6), breastfeeding on demand (step 8) and use of artificial nipples (step 9) were noted among infants whose mothers were oriented. These findings indicate the important role of health professionals on mother/child training about breastfeeding, on encouragement of the skin/skin contact, exclusive breastfeeding and breastfeeding on demand. The guidelines indicated the need to improve in order to reduce the use of artificial nipples and enhance exclusive breastfeeding.
17.

Práticas educativas segundo os "Dez passos para o sucesso do aleitamento materno" em um Banco de Leite Humano / Educational practices in accordance with the "Ten steps to successful breastfeeding" in a Human Milk Bank

Ciênc. saúde coletiva; 22(5): 1661-1671, maio 2017. tab, graf
Artigo em Português | LILACS | ID: biblio-839978

Resumo

Resumo Este artigo objetivou avaliar práticas educativas segundo os “Dez Passos para o Sucesso do Aleitamento Materno” em Banco de Leite Humano. Estudo retrospectivo com informações sociodemográficas e gestacionais maternas e referentes ao bebê, obtidas de protocolo de atendimento de nutrizes (2009-2012). Tais dados foram associados aos passos relacionados a práticas educativas dentre os “Dez Passos”. Realizou-se análise descritiva, teste qui-quadrado e regressão de Poisson. Foram avaliadas 12.283 mães, com mediana de 29 (12-54) anos de idade. As orientações recebidas sobre amamentação no pré-natal (passo 3) prevaleceram entre mães de 30-39 anos e o contato pele/pele (passo 4) entre as orientadas. O treinamento sobre amamentação (passo 5) predominou entre aquelas que amamentaram exclusivamente. Notou-se maior prevalência de amamentação exclusiva (passo 6) e sob livre demanda (passo 8) e uso de bicos artificiais (passo 9) entre os lactentes de mães orientadas. Os achados apontam importante papel do profissional da saúde no treinamento mãe/filho sobre aleitamento materno e incentivo ao contato pele/pele, amamentação exclusiva e sob livre demanda. As orientações ofertadas necessitam aprimoramento a fim de reduzir o uso de bicos artificiais e potencializar a amamentação exclusiva.
Abstract This article sought to evaluate educational practices in line with the “Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding” in a Human Milk Bank. It involved a retrospective study using sociodemographic data about the pregnancy and the baby, obtained from a nursing mothers care protocol (2009-2012). These data were associated to steps related to educational practices from the “Ten Steps.” Descriptive analysis, chi-square test and Poisson regression were performed. 12,283 mothers, with a median of 29 (12-54) years old, were evaluated. The guidelines about breastfeeding received during prenatal care (step 3) prevailed among mothers aged 30-39 years and the skin to skin contact (step 4) prevailed among oriented mothers. Breastfeeding training (step 5) predominated among those who breastfed exclusively. Higher prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (step 6), breastfeeding on demand (step 8) and use of artificial nipples (step 9) were noted among infants whose mothers were oriented. These findings indicate the important role of health professionals on mother/child training about breastfeeding, on encouragement of the skin/skin contact, exclusive breastfeeding and breastfeeding on demand. The guidelines indicated the need to improve in order to reduce the use of artificial nipples and enhance exclusive breastfeeding.
Biblioteca responsável: BR1.1
18.

Breastfeeding in mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus.

Lupus; 25(9): 973-9, 2016 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26888577

Resumo

INTRODUCTION: Breastfeeding is known to improve the well-being of a mother and her infant, and about half of all new mothers breastfeed, but it is unknown how breastfeeding is pursued in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; lupus) patients. We sought to determine the rate of breastfeeding and the factors influencing this among women with lupus. In addition, we reassessed the current safety data in lactation of lupus medications. METHODS: Data were collected from lupus patients enrolled in a prospective registry who fulfilled the 2012 SLICC criteria, had a live birth, and for whom postpartum breastfeeding status was known. Data included physician assessments of lupus activity and medications, breastfeeding intentions during pregnancy and practice following pregnancy. The safety of medications in breastfed infants was assessed through a comprehensive review of LactMed, a national database about medications in lactation. RESULTS: A total of 51 pregnancies in 84 women with lupus were included in the study. Half of the lupus patients (n = 25, 49%) chose to breastfeed. The rate of breastfeeding was not significantly affected by socioeconomic factors. In contrast, low postpartum lupus activity, term delivery, and a plan to breastfeed early in pregnancy were significantly associated with breastfeeding in lupus patients. In reviewing the most up-to-date data, the majority of lupus medications appear to have very minimal transfer into breast milk and are likely compatible with breastfeeding. CONCLUSION: Half of women with lupus breastfed and most desire to breastfeed. Hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, methotrexate, and prednisone have very limited transfer into breast milk and may be continued while breastfeeding.
19.

Human Milk Banking.

Ann Nutr Metab; 69 Suppl 2: 8-15, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28103607

Resumo

Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula.
20.

Milk kinship is not an obstacle to using donor human milk to feed preterm infants in Muslim countries.

Acta Paediatr; 105(5): 462-7, 2016 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26659819

Resumo

UNLABELLED: The development of human milk banks in Muslim countries is challenging because of the tradition of milk kinship. In other countries, this tradition imposes restrictions on Muslim mothers with regard to donating their milk or receiving donor milk for their preterm baby. However, Muslim law does allow the use of donated human milk under certain conditions, for example if it comes from a single known donor or is pooled from the milk of at least three donors. CONCLUSION: Muslim parents need to be made aware that human milk banks can be used for preterm babies if strict conditions are met.
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