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Retropubic bulbourethral sling in incontinence post-exstrophy repair: 2-year minimal follow up of a salvage procedure.

Neurourol Urodyn; 35(4): 497-502, 2016 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25663249

AIMS:

Post-exstrophy incontinence is a challenge because continence is difficult to achieve and more difficult to maintain. Feasibility and outcomes of a bulbourethral sling to treat post-exstrophy incontinence is shown in this report.

METHODS:

A retropubic bulbourethral sling was applied to male patients with incontinence post-exstrophy-epispadius repair. The study included children with total (continuous) incontinence who underwent multiple previous anti-incontinence procedures, ranging from bladder neck injection to bladder neck reconstruction. Preoperative assessment includes urinalysis, renal US, VCUG, 1-hr pad test and urodynamics. The bulbourethral sling applied is made of polypropylene and is suspended by 4 pairs of nylon sutures, to support the bulbar urethra within its covering muscles with the sutures tied on the rectus muscles. Continence was evaluated as well as adverse events.

RESULTS:

Seventeen children, (median age 8.7 years) completed 24-month of follow up. All had CPRE. Five children (29.27%) were dry. Four micturated through the urethra and one by catheterizing his cutaneous stoma every 3-4 hr. In none, PVR exceeded 10% of expected capacity. Four children underwent re-tightening 1-4 weeks after removal of urethral catheter. Perineal wound dehiscence occurred in one, perineal/suprapubic pain in seven and epididymo-orchitis in one child.

CONCLUSION:

The current technique is promising for difficult cases of incontinence after CPRE. It is safe, as no serious adverse events occurred during follow up period. It is economic and re-tightening is easy to perform. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:497-502, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.