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Potential cardiac arrest - an observational study of pre-hospital medical response.

Scand J Prim Health Care; 34(2): 130-4, 2016 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27092724

OBJECTIVES:

A previous study showed that Norwegian GPs on call attended around 40% of out-of-hospital medical emergencies. We wanted to investigate the alarms of prehospital medical resources and the doctors' responses in situations of potential cardiac arrests.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

A three-month prospective data collection was undertaken from three emergency medical communication centres, covering a population of 816,000 residents. From all emergency medical events, a sub-group of patients who received resuscitation, or who were later pronounced dead at site, was selected for further analysis.

RESULTS:

5,105 medical emergencies involving 5,180 patients were included, of which 193 met the inclusion criteria. The GP on call was alarmed in 59 %, and an anaesthesiologist in 43 % of the cases. When alarmed, a GP attended in 84 % and an anaesthesiologist in 87 % of the cases. Among the patients who died, the GP on call was alarmed most frequently.

CONCLUSION:

Events involving patients in need of resuscitation are rare, but medical response in the form of the attendance of prehospital personnel is significant. Norwegian GPs have a higher call-out rate for patients in severe situations where resuscitation was an option of treatment, compared with other "red-response" situations. Key points This study investigates alarms of and call-outs among GPs and anaesthesiologists on call, in the most acute clinical situations: Medical emergencies involving patients in need of resuscitation were rare. The health care contribution by pre-hospital personnel being called out was significant. Compared with other acute situations, the GP had a higher attendance rate to patients in life-threatening situations.