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Both glucocentric and cardiocentric approaches are necessary for a resilient disease such as diabetes.

Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992); 64(3): 212-213, 2018 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29641785
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex disease that compromises almost all systems in the human organism. Independently of the intrinsic mechanisms, the source of all consequences of DM is hyperglycemia, a condition associated to intense metabolic changes that will lead to increased morbidity and mortality in the long term. Several different therapeutic hypoglycemic oral agents were developed and significantly facilitated the treatment of hyperglycemia acting at different sites, since patients could take more than one agent. This glucocentric approach was somehow criticized as those hypoglycemic drugs have shown weaker than expected benefits in terms of cardiovascular outcomes and there was a sub use of statins and antihypertensive agents in this population. On the other hand, the catastrophic cardiovascular consequences of hypoglycemia in older adults submitted to tight glycemic control and the results of recent clinical trials that showed impressive reduction in cardiovascular outcomes with less potent antidiabetic agents seem to pave the way to a cardiocentric approach including a lax treatment of DM. Interestingly, the results obtained in recent studies with SGLT2 inhibitors are being mostly attributed to mechanisms other than its hypoglycemic effect in spite of including patients at high cardiovascular risk already taking hypoglycemic agents. Considering the worldwide growing number of patients with diabetes, caregivers must follow a dialectical thinking and choose a synthesis approach where glycemic control is the first and foremost target to be achieved, followed by control of cardiovascular risk factors.