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Resting heart rate is associated with metabolic syndrome and predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease: a cross-sectional study.

J Diabetes; 2019 Apr 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30941862

BACKGROUND:

This study examined whether resting heart rate (RHR) was associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the 10-year predicted risk of cardiovascular disease in a Chinese population.

METHODS:

The associations of RHR with MetS and 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD) was examined in a cross-sectional study conducted in Shanghai, China (n = 9486).

RESULTS:

Compared with individuals in the lowest RHR quintile (≤71 b.p.m.), those in the highest quintile (≥91 b.p.m.) had a higher prevalence of MetS (21.2% vs 32.6%, respectively; P < 0.001). Logistic regression analyses showed that the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for MetS was 1.13 (1.08-1.18) for each 10-b.p.m. increment of RHR (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, RHR was strongly associated with the prevalence of hypertension, high blood glucose, and dyslipidemia, but not with central obesity. A stronger association of RHR with MetS was observed among individuals aged <65 years, male, with a body mass index <24 kg/m2 , without diabetes, hypertension, abnormal lipids, and insulin resistance than among their counterparts (P < 0.05 for all). A significantly higher 10-year risk for ASCVD was observed with each 10-b.p.m. increment in RHR in both men and women (ORs [95% CIs] 1.20 [1.07-1.33] and 1.28 [1.17-1.39], respectively; Ptrend = 0.002 and < 0.0001, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this study, RHR was associated with a higher prevalence of MetS and elevated 10-year predicted risk of ASCVD in both Chinese men and women. Whether RHR may serve as an indicator for MetS among relatively healthy individuals requires further investigation.