Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 47.314
Filtrar
Mais filtros








Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
BMC Endocr Disord ; 22(1): 13, 2022 Jan 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34991575

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Research regarding the association between severe obesity and in-hospital mortality is inconsistent. We evaluated the impact of body mass index (BMI) levels on mortality in the medical wards. The analysis was performed separately before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We retrospectively retrieved data of adult patients admitted to the medical wards at the Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. The study was conducted between January 1, 2011, to March 23, 2021. Patients were divided into two sub-cohorts: pre-COVID-19 and during-COVID-19. Patients were then clustered into groups based on BMI ranges. A multivariate logistic regression analysis compared the mortality rate among the BMI groups, before and during the pandemic. RESULTS: Overall, 179,288 patients were admitted to the medical wards and had a recorded BMI measurement. 149,098 were admitted before the COVID-19 pandemic and 30,190 during the pandemic. Pre-pandemic, multivariate analysis showed a "J curve" between BMI and mortality. Severe obesity (BMI > 40) had an aOR of 0.8 (95% CI:0.7-1.0, p = 0.018) compared to the normal BMI group. In contrast, during the pandemic, the analysis showed a "U curve" between BMI and mortality. Severe obesity had an aOR of 1.7 (95% CI:1.3-2.4, p < 0.001) compared to the normal BMI group. CONCLUSIONS: Medical ward patients with severe obesity have a lower risk for mortality compared to patients with normal BMI. However, this does not apply during COVID-19, where obesity was a leading risk factor for mortality in the medical wards. It is important for the internal medicine physician to understand the intricacies of the association between obesity and medical ward mortality.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , COVID-19/mortalidade , Mortalidade Hospitalar/tendências , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Obesidade/fisiopatologia , SARS-CoV-2/isolamento & purificação , Idoso , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/patologia , COVID-19/virologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cidade de Nova Iorque/epidemiologia , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Taxa de Sobrevida
2.
Euro Surveill ; 27(1)2022 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34991775

RESUMO

BackgroundSince the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the disease has frequently been compared with seasonal influenza, but this comparison is based on little empirical data.AimThis study compares in-hospital outcomes for patients with community-acquired COVID-19 and patients with community-acquired influenza in Switzerland.MethodsThis retrospective multi-centre cohort study includes patients > 18 years admitted for COVID-19 or influenza A/B infection determined by RT-PCR. Primary and secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and intensive care unit (ICU) admission for patients with COVID-19 or influenza. We used Cox regression (cause-specific and Fine-Gray subdistribution hazard models) to account for time-dependency and competing events with inverse probability weighting to adjust for confounders.ResultsIn 2020, 2,843 patients with COVID-19 from 14 centres were included. Between 2018 and 2020, 1,381 patients with influenza from seven centres were included; 1,722 (61%) of the patients with COVID-19 and 666 (48%) of the patients with influenza were male (p < 0.001). The patients with COVID-19 were younger (median 67 years; interquartile range (IQR): 54-78) than the patients with influenza (median 74 years; IQR: 61-84) (p < 0.001). A larger percentage of patients with COVID-19 (12.8%) than patients with influenza (4.4%) died in hospital (p < 0.001). The final adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio for mortality was 3.01 (95% CI: 2.22-4.09; p < 0.001) for COVID-19 compared with influenza and 2.44 (95% CI: 2.00-3.00, p < 0.001) for ICU admission.ConclusionCommunity-acquired COVID-19 was associated with worse outcomes compared with community-acquired influenza, as the hazards of ICU admission and in-hospital death were about two-fold to three-fold higher.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Influenza Humana , Estudos de Coortes , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitalização , Hospitais , Humanos , Influenza Humana/diagnóstico , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Masculino , Pandemias , Estudos Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2 , Suíça/epidemiologia
3.
Clin Lab ; 68(1)2022 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35023694

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has continued to aggressively spread and kill. The incidence of complications and associated mortality rates are high. Cardiac damage, which is related to survival, is one of these. The purpose of this study is to assess the role of BNP, a cardiac biomarker, in predicting mortality in COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This single-center, prospective observational study was performed from July to September 2020 in a tertiary university hospital designated for the treatment of COVID-19 patients. Patients whose diagnoses were confirmed with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tested nasopharyngeal swabs and with thoracic computed tomography (CT) findings compatible with COVID-19 pneumonia were included in the study. All clinical and laboratory data were obtained within the first 24 hours of hospital admission. To determine the risk of in-hospital death, patients were followed from admission until their discharge (1 to 15 days). The primary outcome was in-hospital death, defined as the case-fatality ratio. RESULTS: Among all biomarkers that were included in the multivariate analysis only high BNP levels was independently associated with mortality [Mean 1.012, 95% CI (1.005 - 1.02 pg/mL) (p = 0.002)]. Mortality was found to be significantly associated with older age and higher BNP, LDH, AST, HGB, PLT, ferritin, D-dimer, and CRP levels. In addition, mortality was found to be higher with longer duration of hospitalization (p = 0.041). CONCLUSIONS: Our fundamental goal for COVID-19 is to determine whether the hospitalized patients are in the mortality risk group at an early stage of disease. Adding measurement of BNP levels to routine laboratory tests for COVID-19 may be a practical approach to determine the patients with a high risk of mortality.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Peptídeo Natriurético Encefálico , Idoso , Biomarcadores , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitalização , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1, 2022 Jan 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34974828

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Relationships between in-hospital mortality and case volume were investigated for various patient groups in many empirical studies with mixed results. Typically, those studies relied on (semi-)parametric statistical models like logistic regression. Those models impose strong assumptions on the functional form of the relationship between outcome and case volume. The aim of this study was to determine associations between in-hospital mortality and hospital case volume using random forest as a flexible, nonparametric machine learning method. METHODS: We analyzed a sample of 753,895 hospital cases with stroke, myocardial infarction, ventilation > 24 h, COPD, pneumonia, and colorectal cancer undergoing colorectal resection treated in 233 German hospitals over the period 2016-2018. We derived partial dependence functions from random forest estimates capturing the relationship between the patient-specific probability of in-hospital death and hospital case volume for each of the six considered patient groups. RESULTS: Across all patient groups, the smallest hospital volumes were consistently related to the highest predicted probabilities of in-hospital death. We found strong relationships between in-hospital mortality and hospital case volume for hospitals treating a (very) small number of cases. Slightly higher case volumes were associated with substantially lower mortality. The estimated relationships between in-hospital mortality and case volume were nonlinear and nonmonotonic. CONCLUSION: Our analysis revealed strong relationships between in-hospital mortality and hospital case volume in hospitals treating a small number of cases. The nonlinearity and nonmonotonicity of the estimated relationships indicate that studies applying conventional statistical approaches like logistic regression should consider these relationships adequately.


Assuntos
Hospitais , Modelos Estatísticos , Estudos de Coortes , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos
5.
Medicina (B Aires) ; 82(1): 28-34, 2022.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35037858

RESUMO

The main objective was to estimate the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) among patients with COVID-19, to explore associated factors; and to describe clinical evolution of hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted, which included adults confirmed with COVID-19 between 03/12/2020 and 10/15/2020, at Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires. From 6009 people with COVID-19, 408 had previous diagnosis of DM, yielding a prevalence of 6% (95%CI 6-7), higher prevalence was associated with age (12% in = 60 years and 3% in < 60 years; p = 0.01). In-hospital mortality was 6% (95%CI 6-7), being 15% in DM and 6% compared in non-diabetics (p < 0.01). Associated factors with DM were cardiovascular variables such as male sex, hypertension, smoking, chronic renal failure, heart failure, previous coronary disease; and clinical variables proxy of frailty such as: age, dementia and previous institutionalization (all with p < 0.01). Only 23% (96/408) of DM had an HbA1c measurement in the last 3 months and 76% in the last year, with an average 8.6%, and 25% in goal (HbA1c = 7%). Management was mostly in-hospital (59%), with an average hospital stay of 12 days, with the following complications during hospitalization: 6% presented a hypoglycemic value (< 70 mg/dl), 42% required oxygen therapy, 19 % went to intensive care unit, 15% required invasive mechanical ventilation (mean 11 days), and 25% (95%CI 20-31) of in-hospital mortality (mean 82 years).


El objetivo del trabajo fue estimar la prevalencia de diabetes mellitus (DM) entre los pacientes con COVID-19, explorar factores asociados y describir la evolución clínica de aquellos hospitalizados. Se realizó un estudio de corte transversal que incluyó adultos positivos para COVID-19 entre 12/03/2020 y 15/10/2020, en el Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires. De un total de 6009 personas con COVID-19, 408 presentaron diagnóstico previo de DM, arrojando una prevalencia de 6% (IC95% 6-7%), con mayor prevalencia asociada a la edad (12% en = 60 años y 3% en < 60 años; p = 0.01). La mortalidad intrahospitalaria fue 6% (IC95% 6-7), siendo 15% en DM y 6% en no diabéticos (p < 0.01). Los factores asociados a la DM fueron variables, cardiovasculares, sexo masculino, hipertensión arterial, tabaquismo, insuficiencia renal crónica, insuficiencia cardíaca, enfermedad coronaria previa; y variables clínicas de fragilidad como edad, demencia e institucionalización previa (todas con p < 0.01). Solo el 23% (96/408) de los DM tuvo una medición de HbA1c en los últimos 3 meses y el 76% en el último año, con un promedio 8.6%, y un 25% en meta (HbA1c = 7%). El manejo fue mayoritariamente intrahospitalario (59%), con un promedio de estadía hospitalaria de 12 días, con las siguientes complicaciones durante la hospitalización: 6% presentó un valor de hipoglucemia (< 70 mg/dl), 42% requirió oxigenoterapia, el 19% pasó a unidad cerrada, 15% requirió ARM (media de 11 días), y 25% (IC95% 20-31%) de mortalidad (promedio de 82 años).


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitalização , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 89, 2022 Jan 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35045849

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As health care markets in the United States have become increasingly consolidated, the role of market concentration on physician treatment behavior remains unclear. In cardiology, specifically, there has been evolving treatment of acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock (AMI-CS) with increasing use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). However, there remains wide variation in it use. The role of market concentration in the utilization of MCS in AMI-CS is unknown. We examined the use of MCS in AMI-CS and its effect on outcomes between competitive and concentrated markets. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used the National Inpatient Sample to query patients admitted with AMI-CS between 2003 and 2009. The primary study outcome was the use of mechanical circulatory support. The primary study exposure was market concentration, measured using the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index, which was used to classify markets as unconcentrated (competitive), moderately concentrated, and highly concentrated. Baseline characteristics, procedures, and outcomes were compared for patients in differently concentrated markets. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between HHI and use of MCS. RESULTS: There were 32,406 hospitalizations for patients admitted with AMI-CS. Patients in unconcentrated markets were more likely to receive MCS than in highly concentrated markets (unconcentrated 46.8% [5087/10,873], moderately concentrated 44.9% [2933/6526], and high concentrated 44.5% [6676/15,007], p < 0.01). Multivariable regression showed that patients in more concentrated markets had decreased use of MCS in patients in later years of the study period (2009, OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.44-0.94, p = 0.02), with no effect in earlier years. There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSION: Multivariable analysis did not show an association with market concentration and use of MCS in AMI-CS. However, subgroup analysis did show that competitive hospital markets were associated with more frequent use of MCS in AMI-CS as frequency of utilization increased over time. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of hospital market consolidation on the use of MCS and outcomes in AMI-CS.


Assuntos
Coração Auxiliar , Infarto do Miocárdio , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitais , Humanos , Balão Intra-Aórtico , Infarto do Miocárdio/complicações , Infarto do Miocárdio/terapia , Choque Cardiogênico/terapia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
7.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 3, 2022 01 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34983595

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous randomized trials of vitamin C, hydrocortisone, and thiamine on sepsis were limited by short-term vitamin C administration, heterogeneous populations, and the failure to evaluate each component's effect. The purpose of this study was to determine whether vitamin C alone for ≥ 5 days or in combination with corticosteroids and/or thiamine was associated with decreased mortality across the sepsis population and subpopulation. METHODS: Nationwide population-based study conducted using the Korean National Health Insurance Service database. A total of 384,282 adult patients with sepsis who were admitted to the intensive care unit were enrolled from January 2017 to December 2019. The primary outcome was hospital mortality, while the key secondary outcome was 90-day mortality. RESULTS: The mean [standard deviation] age was 69.0 [15.4] years; 57% were male; and 36,327 (9%) and 347,955 did and did not receive vitamin C, respectively. After propensity score matching, each group involved 36,327 patients. The hospital mortality was lower by - 0.9% in the treatment group (17.1% vs 18.0%; 95% confidence interval, - 1.3 to - 0.5%; p < 0.001), a significant but extremely small difference. However, mortality decreased greater in patients who received vitamin C for ≥ 5 days (vs 1-2 or 3-4 days) (15.8% vs 18.8% vs 18.3%; p < 0.001). Further, vitamin C was associated with a lower hospital mortality in patients with older age, multiple comorbidities, pneumonia, genitourinary infection, septic shock, and mechanical ventilation. Consistent findings were found for 90-day mortality. Moreover, vitamin C alone or in combination with thiamine was significantly associated with decreased hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous vitamin C of ≥ 5 days was significantly associated with decreased hospital and 90-day mortality in sepsis patients. Vitamin C combined with corticosteroids and/or thiamine in specific sepsis subgroups warrants further study.


Assuntos
Sepse , Choque Séptico , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Ácido Ascórbico/uso terapêutico , Estudos de Coortes , Quimioterapia Combinada , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Masculino , Sepse/tratamento farmacológico , Choque Séptico/tratamento farmacológico , Tiamina/uso terapêutico
8.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 7, 2022 01 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35012618

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Proteins are an essential part of medical nutrition therapy in critically ill patients. Guidelines almost universally recommend a high protein intake without robust evidence supporting its use. METHODS: Using a large international database, we modelled associations between the hazard rate of in-hospital death and live hospital discharge (competing risks) and three categories of protein intake (low: < 0.8 g/kg per day, standard: 0.8-1.2 g/kg per day, high: > 1.2 g/kg per day) during the first 11 days after ICU admission (acute phase). Time-varying cause-specific hazard ratios (HR) were calculated from piece-wise exponential additive mixed models. We used the estimated model to compare five different hypothetical protein diets (an exclusively low protein diet, a standard protein diet administered early (day 1 to 4) or late (day 5 to 11) after ICU admission, and an early or late high protein diet). RESULTS: Of 21,100 critically ill patients in the database, 16,489 fulfilled inclusion criteria for the analysis. By day 60, 11,360 (68.9%) patients had been discharged from hospital, 4,192 patients (25.4%) had died in hospital, and 937 patients (5.7%) were still hospitalized. Median daily low protein intake was 0.49 g/kg [IQR 0.27-0.66], standard intake 0.99 g/kg [IQR 0.89- 1.09], and high intake 1.41 g/kg [IQR 1.29-1.60]. In comparison with an exclusively low protein diet, a late standard protein diet was associated with a lower hazard of in-hospital death: minimum 0.75 (95% CI 0.64, 0.87), and a higher hazard of live hospital discharge: maximum HR 1.98 (95% CI 1.72, 2.28). Results on hospital discharge, however, were qualitatively changed by a sensitivity analysis. There was no evidence that an early standard or a high protein intake during the acute phase was associated with a further improvement of outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Provision of a standard protein intake during the late acute phase may improve outcome compared to an exclusively low protein diet. In unselected critically ill patients, clinical outcome may not be improved by a high protein intake during the acute phase. Study registration ID number ISRCTN17829198.


Assuntos
Estado Terminal , Terapia Nutricional , Bases de Dados Factuais , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva
9.
Afr J Paediatr Surg ; 19(2): 89-96, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35017378

RESUMO

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mortality and morbidity of infants <1 year of age with intestinal obstruction requiring surgical intervention and to investigate the factors affecting mortality and hospital length of stay in paediatric surgery, including albumin-haemoglobin index. Patients and Methods: The records of gastrointestinal paediatric surgeries in the past 10 years of patients who were <1-year-old at Baskent University Konya Hospital were obtained from the hospital and retrospectively studied. Patient characteristics, especially the relationship between albumin haemoglobin index (AHI) and hospital duration and mortality, were examined. According to the surgical areas, it also subjected this relationship to further analysed in subgroups. Results: There were 144 cases who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Pre-operative serum AHI was analysed using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analyzes. In the ROC analysis, AHI had a diagnostic value in predicting case discharge rates (area under the curve: 0.755, P = 0.001). When the cut-off point was set at 46.18, the sensitivity of the test was 57.5% and the sensitivity for predicting survival was 84%. In the logistic regression model to estimate survival, the odds ratio of AHI was 1.063 (confidence interval: 1.020-1.108, P = 0.004). In subgroup analyzes, AHI positively predicted survival in the NEC group and in the other group. In a linear regression model analysing the effect of AHI on hospital stay of length, AHI explained 10% of the variance in the hospital stay of length variable and significantly and negatively influenced the hospital length variable (ß = -0.319, P = 0.05). In the linear regression model for subgroup analyzes, AHI significantly and negatively predicted hospital length of stay in the NEC and pyloric surgery groups, but positively predicted hospital length of stay in the perforation group. Conclusion: The AHI can be used as a valuable marker to predict the likelihood of discharge and length of hospital stay in paediatric surgical cases <1-year-old.


Assuntos
Albuminas , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos do Sistema Digestório , Hemoglobinas , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Tempo de Internação , Humanos , Lactente , Prognóstico , Curva ROC , Estudos Retrospectivos , Turquia
10.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0261142, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35025917

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic in the United Kingdom has seen two waves; the first starting in March 2020 and the second in late October 2020. It is not known whether outcomes for those admitted with severe Covid were different in the first and second waves. METHODS: The study population comprised all patients admitted to a 1,500-bed London Hospital Trust between March 2020 and March 2021, who tested positive for Covid-19 by PCR within 3-days of admissions. Primary outcome was death within 28-days of admission. Socio-demographics (age, sex, ethnicity), hypertension, diabetes, obesity, baseline physiological observations, CRP, neutrophil, chest x-ray abnormality, remdesivir and dexamethasone were incorporated as co-variates. Proportional subhazards models compared mortality risk between wave 1 and wave 2. Cox-proportional hazard model with propensity score adjustment were used to compare mortality in patients prescribed remdesivir and dexamethasone. RESULTS: There were 3,949 COVID-19 admissions, 3,195 hospital discharges and 733 deaths. There were notable differences in age, ethnicity, comorbidities, and admission disease severity between wave 1 and wave 2. Twenty-eight-day mortality was higher during wave 1 (26.1% versus 13.1%). Mortality risk adjusted for co-variates was significantly lower in wave 2 compared to wave 1 [adjSHR 0.49 (0.37, 0.65) p<0.001]. Analysis of treatment impact did not show statistically different effects of remdesivir [HR 0.84 (95%CI 0.65, 1.08), p = 0.17] or dexamethasone [HR 0.97 (95%CI 0.70, 1.35) p = 0.87]. CONCLUSION: There has been substantial improvements in COVID-19 mortality in the second wave, even accounting for demographics, comorbidity, and disease severity. Neither dexamethasone nor remdesivir appeared to be key explanatory factors, although there may be unmeasured confounding present.


Assuntos
COVID-19/mortalidade , Mortalidade Hospitalar/tendências , Pacientes Internados/estatística & dados numéricos , Monofosfato de Adenosina/análogos & derivados , Monofosfato de Adenosina/uso terapêutico , Idoso , Alanina/análogos & derivados , Alanina/uso terapêutico , COVID-19/tratamento farmacológico , Estudos de Coortes , Comorbidade/tendências , Dexametasona/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Londres , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias/estatística & dados numéricos , Alta do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais
11.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e049506, 2022 01 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35039282

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Existing UK prognostic models for patients admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 are limited by reliance on comorbidities, which are under-recorded in secondary care, and lack of imaging data among the candidate predictors. Our aims were to develop and externally validate novel prognostic models for adverse outcomes (death and intensive therapy unit (ITU) admission) in UK secondary care and externally validate the existing 4C score. DESIGN: Candidate predictors included demographic variables, symptoms, physiological measures, imaging and laboratory tests. Final models used logistic regression with stepwise selection. SETTING: Model development was performed in data from University Hospitals Birmingham (UHB). External validation was performed in the CovidCollab dataset. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with COVID-19 admitted to UHB January-August 2020 were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Death and ITU admission within 28 days of admission. RESULTS: 1040 patients with COVID-19 were included in the derivation cohort; 288 (28%) died and 183 (18%) were admitted to ITU within 28 days of admission. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) for mortality was 0.791 (95% CI 0.761 to 0.822) in UHB and 0.767 (95% CI 0.754 to 0.780) in CovidCollab; AUROC for ITU admission was 0.906 (95% CI 0.883 to 0.929) in UHB and 0.811 (95% CI 0.795 to 0.828) in CovidCollab. Models showed good calibration. Addition of comorbidities to candidate predictors did not improve model performance. AUROC for the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium 4C score in the UHB dataset was 0.753 (95% CI 0.720 to 0.785). CONCLUSIONS: The novel prognostic models showed good discrimination and calibration in derivation and external validation datasets, and performed at least as well as the existing 4C score using only routinely collected patient information. The models can be integrated into electronic medical records systems to calculate each individual patient's probability of death or ITU admission at the time of hospital admission. Implementation of the models and clinical utility should be evaluated.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Medição de Risco , SARS-CoV-2 , Atenção Secundária à Saúde
13.
Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi ; 61(1): 104-107, 2022 Jan 01.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34979779

RESUMO

To determine the physicians'compliance of hour-1 bundle for sepsis. A management system of hour-1 bundle for sepsis was established. The clinical data of 286 sepsis patients were collected, who were classified into 3 months before the bundle (control group), 9 months during process (observation group) and 3 months after bundle (study group). The compliance of hour-1 bundle implementation was compared in three groups. The results showed that with the application and implementation of the management system, the compliance of hour-1 bundle for sepsis in the control group, observation group and study group was 58.3%(28/48), 69.1%(105/152) and 88.4%(76/86) respectively (χ2=7.053,P=0.029). The 28 day mortality in sepsis patients was 41.7%(20/48), 34.9%(53/152) and 23.3%(20/86) respectively (χ2=5.576,P=0.062).The management system of hour-1 bundle for sepsis can effectively improve the physicians' compliance.


Assuntos
Sepse , Choque Séptico , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Corpo Clínico , Sepse/diagnóstico , Sepse/terapia
14.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e054069, 2022 01 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980623

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The first COVID-19-19 epidemic wave was over the period of February-May 2020. Since 1 October 2020, Italy, as many other European countries, faced a second wave. The aim of this analysis was to compare the 28-day mortality between the two waves among COVID-19 hospitalised patients. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. Standard survival analysis was performed to compare all-cause mortality within 28 days after hospital admission in the two waves. Kaplan-Meier curves as well as Cox regression model analysis were used. The effect of wave on risk of death was shown by means of HRs with 95% CIs. A sensitivity analysis around the impact of the circulating variant as a potential unmeasured confounder was performed. SETTING: University Hospital of Modena, Italy. Patients admitted to the hospital for severe COVID-19 pneumonia during the first (22 February-31 May 2020) and second (1 October-31 December 2020) waves were included. RESULTS: During the two study periods, a total of 1472 patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia were admitted to our hospital, 449 during the first wave and 1023 during the second. Median age was 70 years (IQR 56-80), 37% women, 49% with PaO2/FiO2 <250 mm Hg, 82% with ≥1 comorbidity, median duration of symptoms was 6 days. 28-day mortality rate was 20.0% (95% CI 16.3 to 23.7) during the first wave vs 14.2% (95% CI 12.0 to 16.3) in the second (log-rank test p value=0.03). After including key predictors of death in the multivariable Cox regression model, the data still strongly suggested a lower 28-day mortality rate in the second wave (aHR=0.64, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.90, p value=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In our hospitalised patients with COVID-19 with severe pneumonia, the 28-day mortality appeared to be reduced by 36% during the second as compared with the first wave. Further studies are needed to identify factors that may have contributed to this improved survival.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Pandemias , Idoso , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Itália/epidemiologia , Masculino , SARS-CoV-2 , Centros de Atenção Terciária
15.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 10, 2022 01 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34986818

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Narrowing a large set of features to a smaller one can improve our understanding of the main risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19. This study aimed to derive a parsimonious model for predicting overall survival (OS) among re-infected COVID-19 patients using machine-learning algorithms. METHODS: The retrospective data of 283 re-infected COVID-19 patients admitted to twenty-six medical centers (affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences) from 10 June to 26 December 2020 were reviewed and analyzed. An elastic-net regularized Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression and model approximation via backward elimination were utilized to optimize a predictive model of time to in-hospital death. The model was further reduced to its core features to maximize simplicity and generalizability. RESULTS: The empirical in-hospital mortality rate among the re-infected COVID-19 patients was 9.5%. In addition, the mortality rate among the intubated patients was 83.5%. Using the Kaplan-Meier approach, the OS (95% CI) rates for days 7, 14, and 21 were 87.5% (81.6-91.6%), 78.3% (65.0-87.0%), and 52.2% (20.3-76.7%), respectively. The elastic-net Cox PH regression retained 8 out of 35 candidate features of death. Transfer by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) (HR=3.90, 95% CI: 1.63-9.48), SpO2≤85% (HR=8.10, 95% CI: 2.97-22.00), increased serum creatinine (HR=1.85, 95% CI: 1.48-2.30), and increased white blood cells (WBC) count (HR=1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.15) were associated with higher in-hospital mortality rates in the re-infected COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: The results of the machine-learning analysis demonstrated that transfer by EMS, profound hypoxemia (SpO2≤85%), increased serum creatinine (more than 1.6 mg/dL), and increased WBC count (more than 8.5 (×109 cells/L)) reduced the OS of the re-infected COVID-19 patients. We recommend that future machine-learning studies should further investigate these relationships and the associated factors in these patients for a better prediction of OS.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Algoritmos , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Aprendizado de Máquina , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 102(1): 62-66, 2022 Jan 04.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34991239

RESUMO

Objective: To investigate the value of ischemia modified albumin (IMA) level for predicting in-hospital mortality in patients with acute aortic dissection (AAD). Methods: A total of 195 patients with AAD from the Department of Cardio-Vascular Surgery of Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College from January 2017 to November 2019 were consecutively collected, with 126 males and 69 females. Based on whether they died during hospitalization or not, these patients were divided into 2 groups: survival group and mortality group. The baseline data and IMA levels at admission of the two groups were recorded. Univariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the independent risk factors, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was further performed on variables with statistical significance in univariate analysis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated to determine the value of IMA for predicting in-hospital mortality in patients with AAD. Results: Forty-two AAD patients died and 153 survived, and the mortality rate was 21.5%. Logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR=2.143,95%CI:1.247-4.826,P=0.011), Stanford type A (OR=6.751,95%CI:3.189-14.291,P<0.001), drug therapy (OR=5.133,95%CI:2.463-10.700,P<0.001), IMA level (OR=4.452,95%CI:2.231-8.953,P=0.004) were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with AAD, however surgery was a protective factor (OR=0.195,95%CI:0.093-0.406,P<0.001). The area under the ROC curve for IMA level in predicting in-hospital mortality with AAD was 0.838 (95%CI: 0.774-0.901, P<0.001), with a cut-off value of 86.55 U/ml, and the sensitivity and specificity were 83.3% and 75.2%, respectively. Conclusions: IMA may serve as a simple risk assessment indicator for patients with AAD. IMA level at admission is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. For patients with higher IMA level, early surgical intervention should be performed.


Assuntos
Aneurisma Dissecante , Albumina Sérica , Biomarcadores , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Isquemia , Masculino , Prognóstico , Curva ROC , Estudos Retrospectivos
17.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 19, 2022 01 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35027073

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Timely administration of antibiotics is one of the most important interventions in reducing mortality in sepsis. However, administering antibiotics within a strict time threshold in all patients suspected with sepsis will require huge amount of effort and resources and may increase the risk of unintentional exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics in patients without infection with its consequences. Thus, controversy still exists on whether clinicians should target different time-to-antibiotics thresholds for patients with sepsis versus septic shock. METHODS: This study analyzed prospectively collected data from an ongoing multicenter cohort of patients with sepsis identified in the emergency department. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were compared for in-hospital mortality of patients who had received antibiotics within 1 h to that of those who did not. Spline regression models were used to assess the association of time-to-antibiotics as continuous variables and increasing risk of in-hospital mortality. The differences in the association between time-to-antibiotics and in-hospital mortality were assessed according to the presence of septic shock. RESULTS: Overall, 3035 patients were included in the analysis. Among them, 601 (19.8%) presented with septic shock, and 774 (25.5%) died. The adjusted OR for in-hospital mortality of patients whose time-to-antibiotics was within 1 h was 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.99; p = 0.046). The adjusted OR for in-hospital mortality was 0.66 (95% CI 0.44-0.99; p = 0.049) and statistically significant in patients with septic shock, whereas it was 0.85 (95% CI 0.64-1.15; p = 0.300) in patients with sepsis but without shock. Among patients who received antibiotics within 3 h, those with septic shock showed 35% (p = 0.042) increased risk of mortality for every 1-h delay in antibiotics, but no such trend was observed in patients without shock. CONCLUSION: Timely administration of antibiotics improved outcomes in patients with septic shock; however, the association between early antibiotic administration and outcome was not as clear in patients with sepsis without shock.


Assuntos
Sepse , Choque Séptico , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Estudos de Coortes , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sepse/tratamento farmacológico , Choque Séptico/tratamento farmacológico
18.
Public Health ; 202: 84-92, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34933204

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify risk factors of in-hospital mortality among diabetic patients infected with COVID-19. STUDY DESIGN: This is a retrospective cohort study. METHODS: Using logistic regression analysis, the independent association of potential prognostic factors and COVID-19 in-hospital mortality was investigated in three models. Model 1 included demographic data and patient history; model 2 consisted of model 1, plus vital signs and pulse oximetry measurements at hospital admission; and model 3 included model 2, plus laboratory test results at hospital admission. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were reported for each predictor in the different models. Moreover, to examine the discriminatory powers of the models, a corrected area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated. RESULTS: Among 560 patients with diabetes (men = 291) who were hospitalised for COVID-19, the mean age of the study population was 61.8 (standard deviation [SD] 13.4) years. During a median length of hospitalisation of 6 days, 165 deaths (men = 93) were recorded. In model 1, age and a history of cognitive impairment were associated with higher mortality; however, taking statins, oral antidiabetic drugs and beta-blockers was associated with a lower risk of mortality (AUC = 0.76). In model 2, adding the data for respiratory rate (OR 1.07 [95% CI 1.00-1.14]) and oxygen saturation (OR 0.95 [95% CI 0.92-0.98]) slightly increased the AUC to 0.80. In model 3, the data for platelet count (OR 0.99 [95% CI 0.99-1.00]), lactate dehydrogenase (OR 1.002 [95% CI 1.001-1.003]), potassium (OR 2.02 [95% CI 1.33-3.08]) and fasting plasma glucose (OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.02-1.07]) significantly improved the discriminatory power of the model to AUC 0.86 (95% CI 0.83-0.90). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with type 2 diabetes, a combination of past medical and drug history and pulse oximetry data, with four non-expensive laboratory measures, was significantly associated with in-hospital COVID-19 mortality.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Idoso , COVID-19/mortalidade , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Feminino , Humanos , Irã (Geográfico)/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco
19.
Arch Cardiovasc Dis ; 115(1): 37-47, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34952827

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Concomitant or cured coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) may lead to difficulties in acute care management and impair prognosis. AIMS: To describe and compare the characteristics, care management and 90-day post discharge outcomes of patients hospitalized for MI who did not have COVID-19 with those of patients with concomitant or previous hospital-diagnosed COVID-19. METHODS: This population-based French study included all patients hospitalized for MI in France (30 December 2019 to 04 October 2020) from the French National Health Data System. Outcomes were described for each COVID-19 group and compared using adjusted logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 55,524 patients hospitalized for MI, 135 had previous hospital-diagnosed COVID-19 and 329 had concomitant COVID-19. Patients with previous hospital-diagnosed COVID-19 had more personal history of cardiovascular diseases than those without concomitant/previous confirmed COVID-19. In-hospital and 90-day post discharge mortality rates of patients with previous COVID-19 were 8.1% and 4.0%, respectively, compared with 3.5% and 3.0% in patients without concomitant/previous confirmed COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR]adjin-hospital 1.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97-3.46; ORadjpostdischarge 0.77, 95% CI 0.28-2.13). Patients with concomitant COVID-19 had more personal history of cardiovascular diseases, but also a poorer prognosis than their no concomitant/no previous confirmed COVID-19 counterparts; they presented excess cardiac complications during hospitalization (ORadj 1.62, 95% CI 1.29-2.04), in-hospital mortality (ORadj 3.31, 95% CI 2.32-4.72) and 90-day post discharge mortality (ORadj 2.09, 95% CI 1.24-3.51). CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital and 90-day post discharge mortality of patients hospitalized for MI who had previous hospital-diagnosed COVID-19 did not seem to differ from those hospitalized for MI alone. Conversely, concomitant COVID-19 and MI carried a poorer prognosis extending beyond the hospital stay. Special attention should be given to patients with simultaneous COVID-19 and MI, in terms of acute care and secondary prevention.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Infarto do Miocárdio , Assistência ao Convalescente , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitalização , Humanos , Infarto do Miocárdio/diagnóstico , Infarto do Miocárdio/epidemiologia , Infarto do Miocárdio/terapia , Alta do Paciente , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Clin Neurosci ; 95: 188-197, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34929644

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to study the impact of age on in-hospital complications and mortality following surgery for Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) associated spine fractures. METHODS: We extracted data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database (1998-2018) using ICD-9/10 codes. Patients with a primary diagnosis of AS associated spine fractures who underwent fusion surgery were included. Complications and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. RESULTS: A total cohort of 8526 patients was identified. Overall, the median age of the cohort was 69 years. AS associated fractures were equally distributed among cervical and thoracolumbar regions. Overall, complications were noted in 48% of patients and pulmonary complications were the most common (32%) followed by renal (13%) and infection (12%). Complications were seen in 57.3% of patients ≥ 70 years of age compared to 38.4% of patients < 70 years of age (p < .0001). Also, 9.9 % of patients ≥ 70 years of age had in-hospital mortality compared to 3.1 % of patients < 70 years of age (p < .0001). Based on surgical approaches, elderly patients (≥70 years) who underwent anterior, posterior, and anterior + posterior approaches had 19.8%, 7.4% and 16.4% in-hospital mortality compared to 5.3%, 2.2% and 7.4% respectively for patients < 70 years. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly patients (≥70 years of age) were 3.2 times more likely to have in-hospital mortality and higher complications compared to younger patients (57% vs. 38%). Cervical compared to thoracolumbar fractures and anterior compared to posterior surgical approaches were associated with higher complications and in-hospital mortality.


Assuntos
Fraturas da Coluna Vertebral , Espondilite Anquilosante , Idoso , Vértebras Cervicais/lesões , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fraturas da Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Espondilite Anquilosante/complicações
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA