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1.
Zoologia (Curitiba, Impr.) ; 37: e36026, Feb. 7, 2020. ilus, graf
Artigo em Inglês | VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1504576

Resumo

The Chestnut-capped Blackbird, Chrysomus ruficapilus (Vieillot, 1819), is a common bird species in flooded areas of South America. Data on its reproductive parameters have been reported mainly for rice paddies from Uruguay and southern Brazil, where reproductive phenology might have been influenced by the chronology of agricultural activities. Here we provide reproductive data for a population in a natural marshland from São Paulo state, southeastern Brazil. A total of 45 active nests were monitored between December 2017 and April 2018. Clutch size was 2.8 ± 0.44. Incubation and nestling periods were respectively 11.8 ± 0.39, and 12.3 ± 0.75 days, and overall nesting success was 65%. The reproductive season lasted about five months, which is longer than that observed in rice paddies from southern Brazil. This suggests that the reproductive phenology has been underestimated before. Although clutch sizes were bigger in our study population than that from rice paddies from southern Brazil, nest survival was higher in the artificial habitat, suggesting that the Chestnut-capped Blackbird can obtain benefits from nesting in artificial habitats.


Assuntos
Animais , Comportamento Sexual Animal , Passeriformes/fisiologia , Reprodução , Tamanho da Ninhada , Brasil , Áreas Alagadas
2.
Zoologia (Curitiba) ; 37: e36026, June 3, 2020. ilus, graf
Artigo em Inglês | VETINDEX | ID: vti-27433

Resumo

The Chestnut-capped Blackbird, Chrysomus ruficapilus (Vieillot, 1819), is a common bird species in flooded areas of South America. Data on its reproductive parameters have been reported mainly for rice paddies from Uruguay and southern Brazil, where reproductive phenology might have been influenced by the chronology of agricultural activities. Here we provide reproductive data for a population in a natural marshland from São Paulo state, southeastern Brazil. A total of 45 active nests were monitored between December 2017 and April 2018. Clutch size was 2.8 ± 0.44. Incubation and nestling periods were respectively 11.8 ± 0.39, and 12.3 ± 0.75 days, and overall nesting success was 65%. The reproductive season lasted about five months, which is longer than that observed in rice paddies from southern Brazil. This suggests that the reproductive phenology has been underestimated before. Although clutch sizes were bigger in our study population than that from rice paddies from southern Brazil, nest survival was higher in the artificial habitat, suggesting that the Chestnut-capped Blackbird can obtain benefits from nesting in artificial habitats.(AU)


Assuntos
Animais , Passeriformes/fisiologia , Reprodução , Comportamento Sexual Animal , Tamanho da Ninhada , Áreas Alagadas , Brasil
3.
Zoologia (Curitiba, Impr.) ; 33(4): e20160068, Sept. 2016. tab
Artigo em Inglês | VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1504403

Resumo

Over the last two decades, several studies have shown that the mating systems of various birds are more complex than previously believed, and paternity tests performed with molecular techniques have proved, for instance, that the commonly observed social monogamy often presents important variations, such as extra-pair paternity. However, data are still largely biased towards temperate species. In our study, at an area of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, we found broods containing at least one extra-pair young (EPY) in the socially monogamous White-necked Thrush Turdus albicollis (Vieillot, 1818). Paternity tests using six heterologous microsatellite loci revealed that four of 11 broods (36.4%) presented at least one extra-pair young (EPY). This rate of EPY is within the range found for other studies in the tropics. This is one of the few studies that present detailed paternity analyses of a Neotropical rainforest passerine. Our findings corroborate the early insights that breeding strategies involving cheating can also be widespread among Neotropical socially monogamous songbirds.


Assuntos
Animais , Aves Canoras/genética , Aves Canoras/sangue , Comportamento Sexual Animal , Copulação , Loci Gênicos , Repetições de Microssatélites
4.
Zoologia (Curitiba) ; 33(4): e20160068, Sept. 2016. tab
Artigo em Inglês | VETINDEX | ID: vti-21178

Resumo

Over the last two decades, several studies have shown that the mating systems of various birds are more complex than previously believed, and paternity tests performed with molecular techniques have proved, for instance, that the commonly observed social monogamy often presents important variations, such as extra-pair paternity. However, data are still largely biased towards temperate species. In our study, at an area of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, we found broods containing at least one extra-pair young (EPY) in the socially monogamous White-necked Thrush Turdus albicollis (Vieillot, 1818). Paternity tests using six heterologous microsatellite loci revealed that four of 11 broods (36.4%) presented at least one extra-pair young (EPY). This rate of EPY is within the range found for other studies in the tropics. This is one of the few studies that present detailed paternity analyses of a Neotropical rainforest passerine. Our findings corroborate the early insights that breeding strategies involving cheating can also be widespread among Neotropical socially monogamous songbirds.(AU)


Assuntos
Animais , Aves Canoras/genética , Copulação , Comportamento Sexual Animal , Aves Canoras/sangue , Loci Gênicos , Repetições de Microssatélites
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