Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 9 de 9
Filtrar
Mais filtros

Tipo de documento
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Acta sci. vet. (Impr.) ; 49(supl.1): 733, 2021. ilus
Artigo em Português | VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1366500

Resumo

Background: Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is characterized by an autoimmune response with production of auto-antibodies and destruction of erythrocytes resulting in anemia. Primary IMHA is referred to a condition when the cause is unknown (idiopathic), whereas secondary IMHA involves changes in red blood cells caused by the action of drugs, neoplasms, or infectious diseases. The diagnosis can be made through changes in the blood count, usually of a regenerative character, Coombs test, and autoagglutination test. The present study aimed to report a case of drug-induced hemolytic anemia, with emphasis on the clinical signs, diagnostic methods, and treatment, in a female dog. Case: A 9-year-old mixed-breed bitch weighing 29.6 kg was referred to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (HCVUFRGS) with a previous diagnosis of gallbladder mucocele that was unresponsive to clinical treatment. After laboratory tests, cholecystectomy was performed, and the procedure required conversion from laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy. Therapy included administration of amoxicillin, dipyrone, tramadol hydrochloride, and meloxicam. Three days after surgery, the dog presented with apathy, lethargy, hyporexia, and a pale and subicteric mucosa. The patient developed hypochromic macrocytic anemia with reticulocytosis, spherocytosis, anisocytosis, and leukocytosis with neutrophilia. The result of the autoagglutination test was positive, confirming the diagnosis. All medications were suspended, and immunosuppressive treatment with dexamethasone was included, with a subsequent switch to prednisolone. After 10 days of treatment, the patient experienced significant improvement, and therapy was discontinued. Discussion: Based on the patient's history, the cause of the IMHA was secondary to drug administration, and it is not possible to distinguish if it was due to one or a combination of drugs, as they were all started and stopped simultaneously. The patient had hypothyroidism, which may have contributed to the production of antibodies against TSH receptors, blocking the hormone's action, thereby causing tissue damage due to T cell-mediated cytotoxicity and the effect of cytokines. The pale and subicteric mucosa, apathy, weakness, lethargy, exercise intolerance, and dyspnea resulted from extravascular hemolysis and bilirubin released from erythrocyte rupture with a subsequent decrease in the number of red blood cells, leading to oxygen transport deficiency. The diagnosis is based on the blood count and results of autoagglutination supported by the response to immunosuppressive therapy. Anemia results in increased production and release of precursor cells from the bone marrow, accompanied by reticulocytosis and increased mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The treatment of IMHA consists of supportive care and immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids to ensure suppression of the immune system, preventing response against erythrocytes. Initially, tramadol hydrochloride, dipyrone, and amoxicillin with potassium clavulanate were suspended to interrupt the cause of IMHA, and administration of dexamethasone in an immunosuppressive dose was started. Therefore, it is important to include drug-induced IMHA in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with anemia after using medications. Early diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and adequate care were important factors for the recovery of the animal.


Assuntos
Animais , Feminino , Cães , Dexametasona/administração & dosagem , Prednisolona/administração & dosagem , Anemia Hemolítica Autoimune/terapia , Anemia Hemolítica Autoimune/veterinária , Testes de Aglutinação/veterinária
2.
Acta sci. vet. (Online) ; 46(supl): 1-6, 2018. ilus
Artigo em Inglês | VETINDEX | ID: vti-734048

Resumo

Background: Hyperadrenocorticism (HAC), is considered a set of symptoms due to excessive exposure to cortisol. Naturally occurring HAC is most often related to pituitary tumors (pituitary-dependent HAC - PDH). Occult HAC, is referred as a clinical picture highly consistent with HAC; however, routine screening tests are negative. In addition, one or more steroids are elevated following administration of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Ovarian granulosa cell tumors, can produce steroids leading to paraneoplastic syndromes. The objective of this study was to report an unpublished case of ovarian granulosa cell tumor associated with occult hyperadrenocorticism in a Yorkshire Terrier.Case: A 13-year-old intact female dog, Yorkshire Terrier, was brought for consultation with slight weight loss, polyuria, polydipsia, irregular estrous cycles, increased abdominal volume and thin coat. On physical examination the animal was gasping and presented severe periodontal disease, bulging abdomen, alopecia and skin hyperpigmentation. Complete blood count presented no changes; however, serum biochemistry evaluation highlighted hyperalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, alkaline phosphatase increased activity, and urinary specific gravity and creatinine below reference values. On abdominal ultrasonography left adrenal gland measured 2.08 cm x 1.08 cm and the right adrenal gland measured 2.11 cm x 0.84 cm, indicating bilateral adrenomegaly compatible with PDH. In the hypogastric abdomen, a large heterogeneous hypoechogenic mass was also observed, with areas of cystic cavities, measuring 5.80 cm x 7.30 cm. A low dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST) was performed, due to PDH suspicion. The test did not confirm HAC, suspecting, then, to be a case of occult/atypical HAC. Due to the strong clinical suspicion, and owner financial problems for further investigated occult HAC, trilostane treatment was initiated.[...](AU)


Assuntos
Animais , Feminino , Adulto , Cães , Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/complicações , Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/veterinária , Neoplasias Ovarianas/veterinária , Células da Granulosa/patologia , Síndrome de Cushing/veterinária
3.
Acta sci. vet. (Impr.) ; 46(supl): 1-6, 2018. ilus
Artigo em Inglês | VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1457987

Resumo

Background: Hyperadrenocorticism (HAC), is considered a set of symptoms due to excessive exposure to cortisol. Naturally occurring HAC is most often related to pituitary tumors (pituitary-dependent HAC - PDH). Occult HAC, is referred as a clinical picture highly consistent with HAC; however, routine screening tests are negative. In addition, one or more steroids are elevated following administration of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Ovarian granulosa cell tumors, can produce steroids leading to paraneoplastic syndromes. The objective of this study was to report an unpublished case of ovarian granulosa cell tumor associated with occult hyperadrenocorticism in a Yorkshire Terrier.Case: A 13-year-old intact female dog, Yorkshire Terrier, was brought for consultation with slight weight loss, polyuria, polydipsia, irregular estrous cycles, increased abdominal volume and thin coat. On physical examination the animal was gasping and presented severe periodontal disease, bulging abdomen, alopecia and skin hyperpigmentation. Complete blood count presented no changes; however, serum biochemistry evaluation highlighted hyperalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, alkaline phosphatase increased activity, and urinary specific gravity and creatinine below reference values. On abdominal ultrasonography left adrenal gland measured 2.08 cm x 1.08 cm and the right adrenal gland measured 2.11 cm x 0.84 cm, indicating bilateral adrenomegaly compatible with PDH. In the hypogastric abdomen, a large heterogeneous hypoechogenic mass was also observed, with areas of cystic cavities, measuring 5.80 cm x 7.30 cm. A low dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST) was performed, due to PDH suspicion. The test did not confirm HAC, suspecting, then, to be a case of occult/atypical HAC. Due to the strong clinical suspicion, and owner financial problems for further investigated occult HAC, trilostane treatment was initiated.[...]


Assuntos
Feminino , Animais , Adulto , Cães , Células da Granulosa/patologia , Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/complicações , Hiperfunção Adrenocortical/veterinária , Neoplasias Ovarianas/veterinária , Síndrome de Cushing/veterinária
4.
Acta sci. vet. (Online) ; 42(suppl.1): Pub. 57, 15 ago. 2014. ilus
Artigo em Português | VETINDEX | ID: vti-30705

Resumo

Background: Primary hepatobiliary tumors are rare in dogs and cats. Studies suggest a prevalence of 0.6% in dogs and 2.9% in cats from all occurring tumors. Neoplasia in these tissues can have hepatocellular and bile ducts origin or even be sarcomas or neuroendocrine tumors. Its clinical signs are nonspecific and the diagnosis is most often tardy or even done during necropsy. A case of cholangiocellular carcinoma and glomerulonephritis in a cat is reported, addressing its clinical aspects and emphasizing the importance of an early diagnosis. Case: A mixed breed, 12-year-old neutered cat was admitted in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul treated previously without obvious improvement. Jaundice, severe dehydration, excessive salivation, low body condition (score three out of nine), abdominal discomfort, and lethargy were evident on physical examination. Blood tests showed neutrophilic leukocytosis, lymphopenia, and increased serum levels of both alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase enzymes. Abdominal ultrasound examination revealed a large single mass of three centimeters of diameter, approximately, compressing the bile ducts. Because of the severity of the patients condition, it was hospitalized to receive supportive care. During hospitalization, the animal received feeding through an esophageal tube, intravenous fluid...(AU)


Assuntos
Animais , Gatos , Colangiocarcinoma/patologia , Colangiocarcinoma/veterinária , Sistema Biliar/patologia , Fígado/patologia , Icterícia , Neoplasias do Sistema Biliar/veterinária , Neoplasias Hepáticas/veterinária
5.
Acta sci. vet. (Impr.) ; 42(suppl.1): Pub.57-30 jul. 2014. ilus
Artigo em Português | VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1457270

Resumo

Background: Primary hepatobiliary tumors are rare in dogs and cats. Studies suggest a prevalence of 0.6% in dogs and 2.9% in cats from all occurring tumors. Neoplasia in these tissues can have hepatocellular and bile ducts origin or even be sarcomas or neuroendocrine tumors. Its clinical signs are nonspecific and the diagnosis is most often tardy or even done during necropsy. A case of cholangiocellular carcinoma and glomerulonephritis in a cat is reported, addressing its clinical aspects and emphasizing the importance of an early diagnosis. Case: A mixed breed, 12-year-old neutered cat was admitted in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul treated previously without obvious improvement. Jaundice, severe dehydration, excessive salivation, low body condition (score three out of nine), abdominal discomfort, and lethargy were evident on physical examination. Blood tests showed neutrophilic leukocytosis, lymphopenia, and increased serum levels of both alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase enzymes. Abdominal ultrasound examination revealed a large single mass of three centimeters of diameter, approximately, compressing the bile ducts. Because of the severity of the patients condition, it was hospitalized to receive supportive care. During hospitalization, the animal received feeding through an esophageal tube, intravenous fluid...


Assuntos
Animais , Gatos , Colangiocarcinoma/patologia , Colangiocarcinoma/veterinária , Fígado/patologia , Sistema Biliar/patologia , Icterícia , Neoplasias Hepáticas/veterinária , Neoplasias do Sistema Biliar/veterinária
6.
Rev. Ciênc. Agrovet. (Online) ; 12(Especial): 43-44, junho 2013.
Artigo em Português | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1488014

Resumo

Produtos utilizados para controle de roedores ocupam a terceira posição entre as causas mais comuns de exposições a agentes tóxicos em cães. Cerca de 20% dessas exposições resultam em intoxicação (OSWEILER, 1998). A terapêutica adequada e o tempo decorrido entre a ingestão e os primeiros procedimentos são os principais fatores determinantes do sucesso do tratamento, o qual pode ocasionar distúrbios de coagulação e morte do paciente, se não for bem conduzido. Este trabalho relata um caso de ingestão acidental de brodifacoum por um cão e a subsequente abordagem terapêutica emergencial.


Assuntos
Masculino , Animais , Cães , Monitorização Fisiológica/veterinária , Rodenticidas/intoxicação , Vitamina K/administração & dosagem , Anticoagulantes/toxicidade , Carvão Vegetal/administração & dosagem
7.
R. Ci. agrovet. ; 12(Especial): 43-44, junho 2013.
Artigo em Português | VETINDEX | ID: vti-11972

Resumo

Produtos utilizados para controle de roedores ocupam a terceira posição entre as causas mais comuns de exposições a agentes tóxicos em cães. Cerca de 20% dessas exposições resultam em intoxicação (OSWEILER, 1998). A terapêutica adequada e o tempo decorrido entre a ingestão e os primeiros procedimentos são os principais fatores determinantes do sucesso do tratamento, o qual pode ocasionar distúrbios de coagulação e morte do paciente, se não for bem conduzido. Este trabalho relata um caso de ingestão acidental de brodifacoum por um cão e a subsequente abordagem terapêutica emergencial.(AU)


Assuntos
Animais , Masculino , Cães , Rodenticidas/intoxicação , Vitamina K/administração & dosagem , Monitorização Fisiológica/veterinária , Anticoagulantes/toxicidade , Carvão Vegetal/administração & dosagem
8.
Acta sci. vet. (Impr.) ; 41(supl.1): Pub. 1, 2013. ilus
Artigo em Português | VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1372971

Resumo

Background: Ureteral ectopia is a congenital abnormality of the terminal segment of one or both ureters, in which the ureteral orifice is located distal to the trigone of the bladder. Ureteral ectopia results from dysembryogenesis of the ureteral bud due to its abnormal positioning along the mesonephric duct. It is frequently associated with other congenital anomalies of the lower urinary tract as urethral sphincter dysfunction, hydroureter and hydronephrosis. Ectopic ureters are classified into two categories: extramural and intramural. Extramural ectopic ureters completely bypass the urinary bladder without anatomic attachment, opening directly into the urethra, vagina or uterus. Continuous or intermittent urinary incontinence is the most frequently reported clinical symptom associated with ureteral ectopia, and it is far more frequent in young bitches than in male dogs. Repositioning the distal segment of the ureter and ureteral orifice directly into the bladder may restore urinary continence throughout neoureterocistostomy. Case: A 3-month-old female poodle weighting 4 kg was referred to the Teaching Veterinary Hospital of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (HCV-UFRGS), State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, due to urinary incontinence, dysuria and severe vulvar pyodermatitis since it was 9 weeks old. Normal posturing and voiding of urine did occur, although only small volumes of urine were eliminated. Abdominal ultrasound revealed hydronephrosis and hydroureter of both right kidney and ureter. The ureter terminated distal to the urinary bladder, although the exact location of the termination could not be determined, ectopic ureter was suggested. Exploratory celiotomy was performed in order to confirm the diagnosis and obtain surgical correction. During the surgery it was possible to identify the hydroureter attaching on the distal urethra bypassing the bladder. Surgical correction was performed using the standard neoureterocistostomy technique. Recovery was uncomplicated and lasted 4 weeks, certified with weekly ultrasound exams. Discussion: Although ureteral ectopia has been reported in both purebred and mixed breed dogs, it has been documented to occur with greater frequency in specific breeds such as toy poodle, as observed in this case. Urinary incontinence, as observed, is the most frequently reported clinical symptom of patients with ureteral ectopia. Physical examination is often within normal limits with the exception of moist or urine-stained hair in the perivulvar region. Mild to severe perivulvar dermatitis secondary to urine scalding are commonly reported clinical signs, and were present in this case. Ultrasound examination was an efficient method to identify anatomic anomalies of the inferior urinary tract leading correctly to an exploratory celiotomy, in order to both confirm and correct the congenital defect. The neoureterocistostomy was satisfactory to reimplant the ureter on the bladder without complications. The degree of urinary incontinence is variable and cannot be used to determine the specific location of the ureteral orifice, or distinguish between the presence of unilateral or bilateral ectopic ureters and cannot exclude other differential diagnosis. Incontinence in male dogs with this affection may not occur as commonly due to the longer external urethral sphincter that may oppose the passage of urine distally, resulting in retrograde bladder filling. Surgical prognosis and recovery was good considering the patient had no other clinical affections.


Assuntos
Animais , Feminino , Cães , Ureter/anormalidades , Doenças Ureterais/cirurgia , Incontinência Urinária/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico por imagem , Cães
9.
Acta sci. vet. (Impr.) ; 40(3): Pub. 1063, 2012. ilus
Artigo em Português | VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1373720

Resumo

Background: Endocrine tumors are considered rare in veterinary medicine. Studies suggest that only one or two per cent of these are primary neoplasms of the adrenal glands. Concerning the histological classification of these masses, the most frequently occurring malignant neoplasms in dogs are adenocarcinomas and pheochromocytomas and, among the benign tumors, adenomas are the most common. Although much rarer, hemangiomas, myelolipomas, among others, may also occur. Dogs with this kind of neoplasm could be asyntomatic or show gastrointestinal signs, pain and urinary tract infection. Adrenalectomy is the treatment of choice and could be curative in most cases. This paper reports a case of two concurrent benign, rare adrenal neoplasms in a dog, emphasizing the clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment. Case: An eight-year-old, male castrated Chow-chow, weighting twenty one kilograms, was admitted at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) with a history of intermittent vomiting and diarrhea since it was a puppy. Because of the chronicity and nonspecific signs, additional tests were requested. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a round mass, measuring approximately 3.7 cm x 3.2 cm, suggesting a neoplasm. Blood pressure was measured and the mean value was 152 mmHg. Laboratory tests included a complete blood count, albumin (31.62 g/L), alanine aminotransferase (26.19 U/L), alkaline phosphatase (64.68 U/L), sodium (147 mmoL), potassium (4.5 mEq/L), fasting blood glucose (60.87 mg/dL), cholesterol (137.64 mg/dL), triglycerides (34.89 mg/dL), amylase (592 U/L), lipase (163 U/L), creatinine (0.67 mg/dL), and parasitologic exam of the feaces, which revealed no significant changes at all. An unilateral adrenalectomy was performed for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The patient was anesthetized and was placed in left lateral recumbency. An incision was made along the thirteenth rib, allowing an adequate visualization of the right adrenal. A careful dissection and ligation of vessels was performed, the gland was removed and sent for histopathology. The abdominal cavity was sutured routinely. Histopathological examination disclosed two fragments of benign tumors, namely myelolipoma and hemangioma. The animal had an excellent postoperative recovery, being given antibiotics, analgesics and daily dressings as treatment. In the follow-up reexamination only mucus persisted in the stool, however a diagnostic colonoscopy was not authorized by the owner. Discussion: Adrenalectomy represented both the definitive diagnostic and therapeutic methods of choice, since the growth of these masses could compromise adjacent organs. The open approach is the method used for adrenalectomy in veterinary patients, as opposed to people, where the laparoscopic surgery is generally chosen. In this report, we opted for an right paracostal incision to allow a better exposure and dissection of the adrenal gland in this medium-sized dog. There was no need for supplemental glucocorticoids in the postoperative period because these neoplasms are non-functioning, which represents a contraindication for its use. Therefore, total adrenalectomy was proven effective in the treatment of these two concurrent adrenal neoplasms, as supported by the postoperative course.


Assuntos
Animais , Masculino , Cães , Glândulas Suprarrenais/patologia , Glândulas Suprarrenais/diagnóstico por imagem , Adrenalectomia/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Neoplasias/veterinária
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA