Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 3.120
Filtrar
Mais filtros











Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 912, 2022 May 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35525926

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Areca nut (AN) is an addictive substance consumed in the Southeast region and is highly associated with oral premalignant lesions and oral cancer. The impact of AN use in the United States (US) is largely unknown, but the products are readily available and probably used by a significant fraction of Asian immigrants or descendants living in the US. We aimed at assessing AN use prevalence among the Asian community in Houston, Texas. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire was used to interview adult individuals (≥ 18 years of age) who self-identified as Asian immigrants or descendants residing in Houston. Means, frequencies, and proportions were reported. Factors associated with AN use were evaluated using logistic regression. RESULTS: We surveyed 275 individuals (58% women, 43% between 35-54 years old, 67% born outside of the US, and 6% concurrent smokers). Among respondents, 91% were familiar with AN products, 17% self-reported ever use of AN products in the US, and 31% had friends/family members who were AN ever users. AN use was significantly associated with being Indian Subcontinent immigrants or descendants (ISID) (OR = 3·9; CI: 1·10,13·81; p = 0·035) and having friends/family members using AN products (OR = 6·2; CI: 1·69, 22·69; p = 0·006). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide quantitative data on the prevalence of AN ever use and context for future AN prevention and cessation interventions specific to the Southeast Asian groups living in the US mainland. This is crucial for the prevention and control of oral cancer and other detrimental conditions related to AN consumption.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Bucais , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Adulto , Areca , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Nozes , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
2.
BMC Oral Health ; 22(1): 154, 2022 04 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35488268

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Up to now, limited research has been done on a significant number of cases with all types of gingival lesion. Besides, the available literature does not provide reliable data on the epidemiology of gingival lesions, especially non-reactive lesions. Thus, the present study aimed to analyze the frequency and distribution of gingival lesions in an Iranian population. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted on 1000 gingival biopsy samples during 22 years. All lesion types were evaluated in terms of location, clinical signs and symptoms, and patients' age and gender. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-square test. RESULTS: Out of the 5284 oral lesions, 1000 (18.92%) gingival lesions were detected, with a female dominance (64.06%). The incidence peak (35.6%) was observed in the third and fourth decades. Non-neoplastic lesions accounted for 92.4% of the cases. The most common reports were related to reactive lesions (71.8%), with the highest prevalence being related to pyogenic granuloma. Additionally, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was the most common neoplasm, and exophytic changes and color changes were the most frequent clinical signs. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings indicated the high prevalence of gingival pathological lesions. Although most biopsies were reactive in nature, a few cases were malignant, which must be considered by practitioners. Further research is needed to achieve a clear impression about non-neoplastic lesions so as to develop more helpful oral health planning.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Doenças da Gengiva , Neoplasias Bucais , Biópsia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/patologia , Feminino , Doenças da Gengiva/diagnóstico , Humanos , Irã (Geográfico) , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos
3.
Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal ; 27(3): e274-e284, 2022 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35368013

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Lip, oral cavity, and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) represent a major health problem in the global scenario. In South America, the highest incidence rates are seen in Brazil. Therefore, the epidemiological and clinical profile and survival outcomes of lip, oral cavity, and oropharyngeal SCC was studied in São Paulo State, Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The clinicopathological data of 12,099 patients with lip, oral cavity, and oropharyngeal SCC were obtained from hospital cancer registries of the Fundação Oncocentro de São Paulo, Brazil (2010-2015). Survival rates and other analyses were performed using SPSS software. RESULTS: A clear male predominance was observed, particularly for patients with oropharyngeal SCC (88.3%). The average age of patients was higher for lip cases (65 ± 13.5 years) compared to other sites. The schooling level was low for most patients, especially in lip cases (87.9%). Most of the patients with oral cavity (71.8%) and oropharyngeal (86.3%) SCC had advanced-stage (III-IV) disease. However, the majority of lip cases (83.3%) were at an early stage (I-II). Surgical excision was the main treatment for lip (72%) and oral cavity SCC (23.5%), and chemoradiotherapy was the main treatment for oropharyngeal SCC (40.2%). The 5-year overall survival (OS) for patients with lip, oral cavity, and oropharyngeal SCC were 66.3, 30.9, and 22.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the determinants of OS were different for lip, oral cavity, and oropharyngeal SCC, except for those at the clinical stage, which was an independent predictor for all sites. CONCLUSIONS: OS-independent determinants varied according to the affected site. Oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC presented worse survival rates than those for lip SCC.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Neoplasias Bucais , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas , Idoso , Brasil/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/terapia , Feminino , Humanos , Lábio/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/terapia , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/terapia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas de Cabeça e Pescoço/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas de Cabeça e Pescoço/terapia
4.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 78: 102150, 2022 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35390586

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genetic alterations of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) allow the understanding of the oral carcinogenesis and the identification of molecular biomarkers that aid the early diagnosis of the disease. The copy number variation (CNV) of GSTM1 and GSTT1 are promising targets because these two genes codify enzymes that perform the inactivation of tobacco carcinogens, which are the main risk factor of OSCC. However, the different levels of - detoxification mechanism in relation to each copy of the genes are unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the possible association of the CNV of GSTM1 and GSTT1 with the risk of development of OSCC. METHODS: A total of 234 OSCC patients and 422 patients without any cancer diagnoses were recruited from Heliópolis Hospital from 2000 to 2011. The CNV was determined by TaqMan real-time PCR and the CopyCaller software. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) values were calculated by Multiple Logistic Regression. RESULTS: Most OSCC patients reported they continued smoking high amounts of cigarettes despite the tumor diagnosis. The CNV of GSTM1 varied from zero to two copies and the analysis revealed that two copies of GSTM1 decreased by 53% the OSCC risk (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.24-0.92) and the risk of the tumor was modified according to the interaction of the CNV of GSTM1 and the cigarette smoking consumption, which for the amount of 40 packs-year of cigarettes the OSCC risk diminished progressively according to the increase of copies of GSTM1. Although the GSTT1 gene varied from zero to three copies, none of them were associated with the tumor risk. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that the CNV of GSTM1 might be applied as a tool for the surveillance of patients and the early detection of OSCC.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Neoplasias Bucais , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/genética , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/patologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Variações do Número de Cópias de DNA , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genótipo , Glutationa Transferase/genética , Humanos , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/genética , Neoplasias Bucais/patologia , Razão de Chances , Fatores de Risco
5.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266558, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35472099

RESUMO

Oral cancer continues to be diagnosed in advanced stages, giving patients lower chances of survival. The objective of this study was to explore reasons for delayed diagnosis of oral cancer in Alberta. A retrospective qualitative design was implemented through seven steps suggested for conducting a narrative clinical document. Data was retrieved from the Alberta Cancer Registry database between 2005 and 2017. A sample of initial consultation notes (ICN) of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients were identified through a purposeful sampling method and added to the study until saturation was achieved. A deductive analysis approach inspired by the model pathways to treatment health care provider (HCP) was employed. From the 34 ICN included in our analysis, five main categories were identified: appraisal interval, help-seeking interval, diagnosis interval, pre-treatment interval, and other contributing factors such as health-related behaviours, system delay, and tumor characteristics. These factors negatively contributed to early detection of oral and oropharyngeal cancers and affect treatment wait time with patients, providers, and the healthcare system. Patient's lack of awareness, provider's oversight and prolonged access to care were the main reasons of delay in cancer diagnosis and management in our study. A sustainable plan for public awareness interventions and implementation of a solid curriculum for medical and dental students is needed to enhance their related knowledge, competence in clinical judgement, and treatment managements.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Bucais , Alberta/epidemiologia , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Neoplasias Bucais/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Estudos Retrospectivos
6.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266346, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35446870

RESUMO

Although clinical and epidemiological aspects of oral cancers (OC) are well-documented in the literature, there is a lack of evidence on the economic burden of OC. This study aims to provide a comprehensive systematic assessment on the economic burden of OC based on available evidence worldwide. A systematic review was conducted. The population was any individual, who were exposed to OC, considered here as lip (LC), oral cavity (OCC), or oropharynx (OPC) cancer. The outcome was information on direct (medical and non-medical) and indirect (productivity loss and early death) costs. The data sources included Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane, BVS, and NHS EED. A search of grey literature (ISPOR and INAHTA proceedings) and a manual search in the reference lists of the included publications were performed (PROSPERO no. CRD42020172471). We identified 24 studies from 2001 to 2021, distributed by 15 countries, in 4 continents. In some developed western countries, the costs of LC, OCC, and OPC reached an average of Gross Domestic Product per capita of 18%, 75%, and 127%, respectively. Inpatient costs for OC and LC were 968% and 384% higher than those for outpatients, respectively. Advanced cancer staging was more costly (from ~22% to 373%) than the early cancer staging. The economic burden of oral cancer is substantial, though underestimated.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Labiais , Neoplasias Bucais , Humanos , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia
7.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 5726, 2022 Apr 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35388051

RESUMO

Oral cancer is the fourth most common cancer among men in Taiwan. The age-standardized incidence rate of oral cancer among men in Taiwan has increased since 1980 and became six times greater in 2014. To enable effective public health planning for oral cancer, research on the projection of oral cancer burden is essential. We conducted an age-period-cohort analysis on the incidence of oral cancer among men in Taiwan from 1997 to 2017 and extrapolated the trend to 2025. We found that the period trends for young adults aged between 25 and 44 have already peaked before 2017; the younger, the earlier, and then the trends declined. The cohort trends have peaked roughly at the 1972 birth cohort and then declined for all ages. Despite the increasing trend in the age-standardized incidence rate for oral cancer among men in Taiwan from 1997 to 2017, we forecast a peak attained, an imminent decline after 2017, and a decrease of 8.4% in age-standardized incidence rate from 2017 to 2025. The findings of this study contribute to developing efficient and comprehensive strategies for oral cancer prevention and control.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Bucais , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Previsões , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/etiologia , Taiwan/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
9.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265950, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35324990

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Oral cancer (OC) poses a threat to human health and imposes a heavy burden on countries. We assessed the burden imposed by OC on Asian nations from 1990 to 2019 based on gender and age. METHODS: We collected oral cancer data from the 2019 Global Burden of Disease study from 1990 to 2019 in 45 Asian countries and territories. Annual case data and age-standardised rates (ASRs) were used to investigate the incidence, mortality, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) of OC based on age and gender from 1990 to 2019 in 45 Asian countries and territories. Estimated annual percentage changes (EAPCs) were used to assess incidence rate, mortality, and trends in DALYs. RESULTS: The age-standardised incidence rate (ASIR) of OC increased from 1990 to 2019 with an EAPC of 0.32 (95% CI, 0.19-0.46), and the age-standardised death rate of OC remained stable at an EAPC of 0.08 (95%CI, from -0.06 to 0.21). The age-standardised DALYs of OC decreased at an EAPC of -0.16 (95%CI, from -0.30 to -0.02). The proportion of patients older than 70 years increased yearly in terms of incidence, mortality, and DALYs from 1990 to 2019. Of the DALYs, smoking was the main contributor in the Asian regions, and the largest contributor to DALYs in most Asian regions. Other contributors were alcohol use and chewing tobacco. CONCLUSION: Although the burden of OC was declining in Asia, South Asia remained the region with the highest burden. OC caused the greatest burden in Pakistan, Taiwan China, and India. Therefore, measures should be taken to reduce the burden of oral cancer in high-risk regions and countries with attributable risk factors.


Assuntos
Carga Global da Doença , Neoplasias Bucais , Saúde Global , Humanos , Incidência , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Paquistão , Anos de Vida Ajustados por Qualidade de Vida , Fatores de Risco
10.
Evid Based Dent ; 23(1): 20-21, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35338321

RESUMO

Aim This study aimed to investigate periodontal disease as a non-genetic risk factor for oral cancer.Design Case-control study.Patient population Two hundred patients, regardless of periodontal and adverse habits (smoking and alcohol) status, in the age group of 18-90 years were included in this institutional study. One hundred patients with histologically confirmed oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) were included in the case group, while the control group had 100 patients without any oral cancer.Methods Multivariable examination to obtain socioeconomic and lifestyle risk factors was performed with a questionnaire for both the groups and compared statistically. Additionally, oral status (periodontal stage, clinical attachment loss, periodontal pocket depth, bleeding on probing, Silness-Loe plaque index, and decayed, missing, and filled teeth [DMFT] index) of both the groups was recorded and compared statistically.Results A significant correlation was found between age, gender and development of oral cancer. There was a significant co-relation between alcohol intake and oral cancer development. Surprisingly, there was no correlation between smoking habits and passive smoking with oral cancer development in the case group. Overall, 72.1% of case group patients had Stage 4 periodontitis, whereas 51.6% of control group patients had Stage 2 periodontitis. A significant correlation was found between the incidence of oral cancer and the stage of periodontitis.Conclusion The findings of the study support the hypothesis that periodontitis is an independent risk factor for oral cancer.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Neoplasias Bucais , Doenças Periodontais , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/etiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/etiologia , Doenças Periodontais/complicações , Doenças Periodontais/epidemiologia , Índice Periodontal , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem
11.
Evid Based Dent ; 23(1): 36-37, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35338329

RESUMO

Data sources In this systematic review and meta-analysis, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) to identify studies assessing the risk of malignant transformation in oral lichen planus (OLP).Study selection Observational studies published in English between 2003-2020 were independently assessed for inclusion by two blinded investigators.Data extraction and synthesis Data were extracted independently by two investigators followed by discussion to reach consensus. This included: study design and patient characteristics; length of follow-up; risk of bias; method of OLP diagnosis; oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) risk factors; rate of malignant transformation; and individual characteristics of malignant transformation cases. Cases of malignant transformation in the included studies were only included in meta-analysis if: 1) OLP diagnosis met current diagnostic criteria; 2) OSCC developed in the same site as previously diagnosed OLP after at least six months' follow-up; 3) the patient had no history of systemic immunosuppressive therapy, head and neck malignancy, or organ transplantation. Risk of bias was assessed using the modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale, and meta-analysis was conducted to estimate overall risk of OLP malignant transformation using the DerSimonian and Laird method. Pooled univariate odds ratios (OR) for malignant transformation were calculated based on gender, smoking status, alcohol consumption, hepatitis C infection and OLP subtype.Results In total, 593 studies were identified after removal of duplicates and 33 studies were included for data extraction. The included sample comprised 12,838 patients with OLP, and 151 malignant transformation cases were reported in the included studies. The authors excluded 56 malignant transformation cases from the meta-analysis, most commonly because of the absence of pathological OLP diagnosis. Among included malignant transformation cases, the mean (SD) age was 58.1 (12.4) years, and 64% of the sample was female. Random-effects meta-analysis estimated an OLP malignant transformation rate of 0.2% (95%CI: 0.1-0.3%). Heterogeneity was low (I2 = 28.74%, p = 0.065). Malignant transformation was significantly higher among smokers (OR = 4.62, p = 0.001), alcohol consumers (OR = 3.22, p = 0.05), those with hepatitis C (OR = 3.77, p = 0.03) and atrophic or erosive OLP subtypes (OR = 2.70, p = 0.03). Gender was not associated with increased risk of malignant transformation.Conclusions The malignant transformation rate of OLP is likely to be lower than previously reported, possibly as a result of variable diagnostic criteria. Whilst encouraging, clinical vigilance remains necessary, as OLP does carry a small risk of malignant transformation. Smoking, alcohol use, hepatitis C infection and erosive or atrophic subtypes appear to have a greater rate of malignant transformation.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Líquen Plano Bucal , Neoplasias Bucais , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/complicações , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/patologia , Transformação Celular Neoplásica/patologia , Feminino , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/complicações , Humanos , Líquen Plano Bucal/complicações , Líquen Plano Bucal/patologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia
12.
Evid Based Dent ; 23(1): 40-42, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35338331

RESUMO

Design A systematic review of the literature to identify and evaluate the epidemiologic profile, and screen for possible risk factors and spectrum of clinical characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) surrounding dental implants, was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement guidelines.Data sources A search of two databases, Medline and CENTRAL, was undertaken, limited to articles published in English from the oldest records until 10 July 2018. Google Scholar was the grey literature searched. The references list in the included articles was assessed for further inclusion suitability.Study selection Participants included patients diagnosed with OSCC surrounding dental implants. The comparator or control was patients diagnosed with OSCC without dental implants. The outcome was epidemiology and carcinogenesis. The considered study designs were case reports, case series and retrospective studies. Article selection was performed by screening titles and abstracts individually by two blind review authors using the Rayyan platform based on the inclusion criteria. Then, the full text of the selected articles was assessed to identify the eligible articles, and the reasons for exclusion were reported. When a consensus was not achieved between the review authors, a third review author, who acted as a tiebreaker, was consulted.Data extraction Two independent review authors extracted the data using a specific extraction form in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA, USA). The extraction form consisted of authors, publication year, country, study design, number of cases, age, sex, risk factors, region of interest, the clinical aspect of the lesion, radiographic findings, the period between implant placement and tumour diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. The time reported in the studies was converted to months for comparison. A third review author validated the accuracy of the information collected.Synthesis Two independent review authors assessed the risk of bias by applying the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Critical Appraisal Checklist (CAP) for Case Reports and the JBI CAP for Prevalence Studies (for example, retrospective studies). Disagreements were resolved by consulting a third co-author. The Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) tool evaluated the certainty of the evidence of the main outcomes. A PRISMA flow diagram was presented, and a table summary of descriptive characteristics of the 33 included studies. Among the figures available, bar graphs represented the 'clinical features' according to the previous history of oral potentially malignant disorders and regarding the malignancy of oral potentially malignant disorders. In addition, a stacked line with markers represented the sex of the number of cases, displaying the time until diagnosis after implant placement and the time to disease progression.Data analysis A qualitative synthesis was provided. No quantitative data synthesis nor inter-rater agreement assessment was conducted.Results Thirty-one case reports and two retrospective studies, published between 1983 and 2020, met the eligibility criteria. The total sample consisted of 63 patients (male = 44.5%) with an average of 66.7 years (range = 42 to 90 years). Oral potentially malignant disorders were found in 29 patients (46%), of which 65.5% were female patients. The most common lesions were oral lichen planus and leukoplakia in female patients (52.6% and 31.5%) and male patients (20% and 60%). In 25 patients (39.6%), there was information missing about the presence of potentially malignant oral disorders, and oral hygiene status was reported in only 17.4% of the cases. Fifty-six patients (88.8%) of OSCC with dental implants were located in the mandible, and the most common clinical presentations of OSCC with implants were exophytic mass (46%) and ulceration (36.5%). Peri-implant bone loss assessment was performed in 51 patients (80.9%), of which 44 (86.2%) had peri-implant bone loss. Thus, most of these lesions were originally treated as peri-implantitis.Conclusions Most patients with OSCC next to their dental implants were female patients lacking known risk factors, and the common location was the mandible with an exophytic mass or ulceration presentation. A major concern is that the clinical and radiographic features of OSCC could be misdiagnosed as peri-implantitis. Thus, OSCC should be considered in persistent lesions surrounding dental implants. Several of the included reports were missing previous medical history and follow-up information. Hence, better case series and studies are required to support or reject the notion of an association between dental implants and OSCC.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Implantes Dentários , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Neoplasias Bucais , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/induzido quimicamente , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Implantes Dentários/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/induzido quimicamente , Humanos , Masculino , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas de Cabeça e Pescoço
13.
Oral Oncol ; 127: 105799, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35272228

RESUMO

Tobacco and alcohol consumption are the main risk factors for head and neck cancer (HNC). However, some individuals do not have a history of addiction and even so they develop the disease. This study evaluated clinicopathological and prognostic features of non-smoking and non-drinking (NSND) HNC patients. A sample of smoking and/or drinking (SD) HNC patients was used to explore the differences with NSND patients. Data were obtained from 667 patients with squamous cell carcinoma in oral cavity, oropharynx or larynx. The group of NSND individuals represented 12.6% of the HNC patients and had higher prevalence of women and elderly compared to SD group. Among NSND patients, most of them displayed tumors in oral cavity, advanced clinical staging and absence of second primary tumor. NSND HNC patients had higher tumor recurrence and increased overall and specific survival rates at 5-years follow-up. The NSND group showed higher prevalence of tumors in lips and alveolar ridge, lower rate of tumors in floor of mouth and no tumor in soft palate. NSND patients show a distinct profile from that found in SD patients. Clinicopathological features from NSND patients should be considered for HNC management.


Assuntos
Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Neoplasias Bucais , Idoso , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Feminino , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/epidemiologia , Humanos , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/patologia , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia , Prognóstico , Fatores de Risco
14.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 72(3): 477-482, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35320228

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk for oral cancer caused by simultaneous occurrence of more than one of the tested cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 MspI, glutathione S-transferase M1 null gnd Glutathione S-transferases T1 null gene polymorphisms. METHODS: The cross-sectional case-control study was conducted from December 2011 to October 2016 at the Ziauddin University, Karachi, in collaboration with Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, and comprised oral squamous cell carcinoma cases in group A and healthy tobacco habit-matched controls in group B. All investigations were done using standardised laboratory protocols. The outcomes were determined in terms of association of various combinations of cytochrome P450 1A1MspI, glutathione S-transferasesM1 null and glutathione S-transferases T1 null polymorphisms with oral cancer. Data was analysed using SPSS 20. RESULTS: Of the 238 subjects, 140(58.8%) were in group A and 98(41.2%) were in group B. Mean ages in group A and B were 47.1±12.22 and 41.6±14.58 years, respectively. Male/Female ratio in group A was 1.88:1 while 83.4% were using tobacco. When cytochrome P450 1A1MspI homozygous (m2/m2) and glutathione S-transferases M1 null variants occured simultaneously in an individual, an odds ratio of 12.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.20-135.5; p=0.03) among overall tobacco chewers was observed. For glutathione S-transferases M1 not null and glutathione S-transferases T1 null variant combination among overall tobacco users, the conferred odds ratio was 4.58 (95% confidence interval: 0.99-21.2; p=0.05). The other studied gene combinations did not reveal significant associations (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A higher risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma was found to be associated with combined-gene polymorphisms of phase I and phase II enzymes than that attributed to a single-gene polymorphism.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Neoplasias Bucais , Tabaco sem Fumaça , Adulto , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/genética , Tabaco sem Fumaça/efeitos adversos
15.
J Zoo Wildl Med ; 53(1): 92-99, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35339153

RESUMO

The Bornean sun bear (Helarctos malayanus euryspilus) is the smallest subspecies of sun bear. Their numbers are declining, and more research is needed to better understand their health and biology. Forty-four bears housed at the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre (BSBCC) in Sabah, Malaysia, were screened for known and novel viruses in November 2018. Ursid γ-herpesvirus type 1 (UrHV-1) is a herpesvirus that has been detected from swab samples of clinically healthy sun bears and biopsy samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma in sun bears. We detected an UrHV-1-related virus from throat and rectal swabs by molecular viral screening in samples from 15.9% of the sun bears at BSBCC. None of the bears with the UrHV-1-related virus in this study had oral lesions. There is no known report of UrHV-1 detection in the wild sun bear population, and its association with oral squamous cell carcinoma is not fully understood. Finding an UrHV-1-related virus in a rehabilitation center is a concern because conditions in captivity may contribute to spreading this virus, and there is the potential of introducing it into wild populations when a bear is released. This study demonstrates an urgent need to carry out similar surveillance for sun bears in captivity as well as those in the wild, to better understand the impact of captivity on the prevalence and spread of UrHV-1-related viruses. Positive bears also should be monitored for oral lesions to better understand whether there is a causal relationship.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Gammaherpesvirinae , Neoplasias Bucais , Ursidae , Animais , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/veterinária , Malásia/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/veterinária
16.
BMC Cancer ; 22(1): 227, 2022 Mar 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35236321

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx encompass a heterogeneous group of cancers for which known risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption and human papilloma virus (HPV) infection but their influence is site-specific with HPV mainly influencing oropharyngeal cancer. Their incidence and survival rates are not well known over extended periods of time. PATIENTS/METHODS: Data were obtained for Finnish (FI) and Swedish (SE) patients from the Nordcan database recently updated through 2019. Age-adjusted incidence trends (FI from 1953, SE from 1960) and relative survival rates for years 1970 through 2019 were calculated. RESULTS: We observed a prominent increase in oral and oropharyngeal cancers in FI and SE men and women but the trend for oral cancer was interrupted for SE men in 1985 and possibly also for FI and SE women in 2015. The trend changes in male and female oral cancer was confirmed in data for Denmark and Norway. Relative survival for these cancers has improved overall but they differed for one cluster of oral, oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal cancers with 60-70% 5-year survival in the last period and hypopharyngeal cancer with 25% male survival. In all these cancers, survival for old patients was unfavorable. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: We hypothesize that reduction in smoking prevalence helped to stop the increase in oral cancer especially in men. As the prevalence of smoking is decreasing, HPV is becoming a dominant risk factor, particularly for the increasing oropharyngeal cancer. Prevention needs to emphasize sexual hygiene and HPV vaccination.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Faríngeas/epidemiologia , Idoso , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Feminino , Finlândia/epidemiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Bucais/etiologia , Neoplasias Orofaríngeas/etiologia , Infecções por Papillomavirus/complicações , Infecções por Papillomavirus/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Faríngeas/etiologia , Sistema de Registros , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Fumar/epidemiologia , Suécia/epidemiologia
17.
Acta Oncol ; 61(4): 449-458, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35114883

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This article aims to evaluate the impact of smoking status, accumulated tobacco exposure (ATE), and smoking cessation on overall- and disease-free survival (OS and DFS) of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with primary OSCC treated with curative intent between 2000 and 2019 in Copenhagen were included (n = 1808). Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed to compare the survival of patients with different smoking history. Interactions between ATE and (A) tumor subsite and (B) excessive alcohol consumption (EAC) on the survival were evaluated using multivariable Cox regression analyses with interaction terms. RESULTS: We included 1717 patients with known smoking status (62.8% males, median age: 64 years (IQR: 57-71 years)), who had a 5-year OS of 53.7% (95%CI: 49.8%-57.9%). Based on fully adjusted multivariable Cox regression analyses, significantly elevated hazard ratios (HRs) for OS and DFS were identified for current, but not former smokers, compared to never-smokers. An approximately linear relationship between continuous ATE and survival estimates was identified. ATE analyzed as a categorical variable showed significantly elevated HRs for OS of patients with all categories (060 PYs), however only for DFS of patients with >60 PYs, compared to 0 PYs. Furthermore, an unfavorable long-term prognosis was evident after >3.5 (OS) and >2.5 (DFS) years from diagnosis for patients who continued smoking compared to patients with smoking cessation at diagnosis. The survival estimates of patients with different tumor subsite and alcohol consumption differed with increasing ATE. CONCLUSION: Tobacco smoking (assessed as smoking status and ATE) was associated with inferior survival (OS and DFS) among patients with OSCC. Unfavorable long-term prognosis was significant for patients who continued smoking compared to patients with smoking cessation at diagnosis. The impact of ATE on survival of patients with OSCC may depend on the tumor subsite and/or alcohol consumption.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Neoplasias Bucais , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/etiologia , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/etiologia , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas de Cabeça e Pescoço , Fumar Tabaco/efeitos adversos , Fumar Tabaco/epidemiologia
19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35162318

RESUMO

Street-involved people with limited access to regular healthcare have an increased risk of developing oral cancer and a lower survival rate. The objective of this study was to measure the prevalence of oral cancerous/precancerous lesions and determine their associated risk factors in a high-risk, underserved population. In this cross-sectional study, English-speaking adults aged 18 years and older living in a marginalized community in Edmonton were recruited from four non-profit charitable organizations. Data were collected through visual oral examinations and a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, and logistic regressions were applied. In total, 322 participants with a mean (SD) age of 49.3 (13.5) years completed the study. Among them, 71.1% were male, 48.1% were aboriginal, and 88.2% were single. The prevalence of oral cancerous lesions was 2.4%, which was higher than the recorded prevalence in Canada (0.014-1.42: 10,000) and in Alberta (0.011-1.13: 10,000). The clinical examinations indicated that 176 (54.7%) participants had clinical inflammatory changes in their oral mucosa. There was a significant association between clinical inflammatory oral lesions and oral cancerous/precancerous lesions (p < 0.001). Simple logistic regression showed that the risk of the presence of oral cancerous/precancerous lesions was two times higher in participants living in a shelter or on the street than in those living alone (OR = 2.06; 95% CI: 1.15-3.82; p-value: 0.021). In the multiple logistic regression analysis, the risk of oral cancerous/precancerous lesions was 1.68 times higher in participants living in a shelter or on the street vs. living alone after accounting for multiple predictors (OR = 1.67; 95% CI: 1.19-2.37; p-value: 0.022). The results demonstrated a high prevalence of cancerous/precancerous lesions among the study participants, which was significantly associated with clinical inflammatory oral lesions. The evidence supports the need for developing oral cancer screening and oral health promotion strategies in underserved communities.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Bucais , Lesões Pré-Cancerosas , Adolescente , Adulto , Alberta/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mucosa Bucal/patologia , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/patologia , Lesões Pré-Cancerosas/diagnóstico
20.
J Diabetes Complications ; 36(3): 108129, 2022 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35125271

RESUMO

AIM: To assess the frequency of self-reported oral cancer and associated factors among individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) at a tertiary care diabetes centre in South India. METHODS: Individuals with T2D who reported that they had oral cancer were included from the Diabetes Electronic Medical Records (DEMR) database. To assess the association of oral cancer with T2D, a retrospective nested case-control study design was adopted. Individuals with T2D and oral cancer diagnosed after the diagnosis of T2D (n = 78) were considered 'cases', while T2D without oral cancer were considered 'controls' (312) [in a ratio of 1:4 for cases and controls]. The cases and controls were matched for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Logistic regression was used to model predictors of oral cancer in T2D patients. RESULTS: Oral cancer was reported in 78 out of 379,138 (0.02%) individuals with T2D registered at the centre. Logistic regression analysis showed that a HbA1c value ≥ 9% had a significant association with oral cancer with an odds ratio of 2.3 (95% CI: 1.2-4.6) after adjusting for confounding factors. Among individuals with T2D, higher frequency of oral cancer prevalence and risk was observed among those who used any form of tobacco (32.6%, OR = 2.52, 95% CI: 1.5-4.3), consumed alcohol (29.2%, OR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.2-3.3), and those with hypertension (23.9%, OR = 2.05, 95% CI: 1.2-3.6) and hypertriglyceridemia (24.7%, OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.01-2.7). Significant independent predictors of oral cancer among T2D were tobacco use (OR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.1-4.00), high HbA1c (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.03-1.5), hypertension (OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.3-4.2) and insulin use (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.03-3.2). CONCLUSIONS: Regular dental check-ups as part of the follow-up for individuals with T2D will identify and diagnose oral cancer earlier. Further research is required to assess the physiological and biological mechanisms leading to oral cancer in individuals with T2D.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Neoplasias Bucais , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/complicações , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiologia , Humanos , Neoplasias Bucais/complicações , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Autorrelato , Atenção Terciária à Saúde
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA