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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785630

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the demographic characteristics and trauma service structures and processes of hospitals in 15 countries across the Asia Pacific, and to provide baseline data for the integrated trauma database: the Pan-Asian Trauma Outcomes Study (PATOS).METHODS: Medical directors and emergency physicians at PATOS-participating hospitals in countries across the Asia Pacific were surveyed through a standardized questionnaire. General information, trauma care system data, and trauma emergency department (ED) outcomes at each hospital were collected by email and analyzed using descriptive statistics.RESULTS: Survey data from 35 hospitals across 15 countries were collected from archived data between June 2014 and July 2015. Designated trauma centers were identified as the highest hospital level for trauma patients in 70% of surveyed countries. Half of the hospitals surveyed had special teams for trauma care, and almost all prepared activation protocol documents for these teams. Most hospitals offered specialized trauma education programs, and 72.7% of hospitals had a hospital-based trauma registry. The total number of trauma patients visiting the ED across 25 of the hospitals was 300,376. The overall survival-to-discharge rate was 97.2%; however, it varied greatly between 85.1% and 99.7%. The difference between survival-to-discharge rates of moderate and severe injury groups was highest in Taiwan (41.8%) and lowest in Thailand (18.6%).CONCLUSION: Trauma care systems and ED outcomes vary widely among surveyed hospitals and countries. This information is useful to build further detailed, systematic platforms for trauma surveillance and evidence-based trauma care policies.


Subject(s)
Asia , Asians , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education , Electronic Mail , Emergencies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Epidemiology , Humans , Physician Executives , Taiwan , Thailand , Trauma Centers
2.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-377131

ABSTRACT

A multicenter review of the medical records of Japanese post-stroke patients with spastic hemiplegia was conducted to investigate the clinical use of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) by physicians with expertise in the treatment of upper and lower limb spasticity. An analysis of the data from 307 patients treated with BoNT/A during the period January 1, 2012 to November 30, 2013 provided a variety of information on factors relating to BoNT/A injection outcomes, including the total dose of BoNT/A per treatment session, the dose of BoNT/A per muscle, the number of injection sites per muscle, the method used to locate the muscles to be injected, and the dilution of reconstituted BoNT/A. Our analysis indicated that the dose of BoNT/A administered per muscle was usually selected by taking into consideration the severity of spasticity, rather than the patient's body size. Since the technical expertise of experienced clinicians is summarized in this data, it may serve as a useful reference for the use of BoNT/A in routine clinical practice.

3.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-374515

ABSTRACT

Purpose : This study aims to measure the peak cough flow (PCF) in patients with subacute myelo-optic neuropathy (SMON) and study its relation with muscle strength, functional ability and vocal cord function. Methods : We performed a cross-sectional study in 7 patients with SMON (2 men and 5 women, mean age (SD) 81.6 (7.2) years) and in 7 age- and gender-matched patients with orthopedic problems as a control group. Their PCF, ability to walk, the Barthel Index, grip strength and maximum phonation time were assessed. Results : Mean PCF was 218.6± 66.2 L/min (110-300) for the SMON group and 267.1±76.3 L/min (170-360) for the control group (ns). The PCF was correlated with the maximum phonation time (<i>r</i> = 0.91 ; <i>p</i><0.01), but not with grip strength, the Barthel Index or the ability to walk scale. Conclusion : The PCF in patients with SMON tended to be lower compared to the control group. Therefore, evaluating PCF is suggested to be necessary to assess the risk of pneumonia.

4.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362272

ABSTRACT

Objective : To evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) in Japanese patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, single dose, placebo-controlled study (double-blind phase) followed by an open-label, multiple dose extension (open-label phase). Methods : One hundred and nine patients with upper limb spasticity were randomized to receive a single treatment with either a lower dose (120-150 Units ; U), higher dose (200-240U) BTXA or placebo into upper limb muscles in the double-blind phase. These treatments were administered to improve wrist and finger flexion for all patients and thumb flexion in patients with thumb spasticity. Patients who met the re-injection criteria received up to 3 repeated treatments of BTXA (200-240U) into their upper limb muscles with at least 12 weeks between treatments in the open-label phase through 48 weeks. Results : In the double-blind phase there was significant improvement from baseline spasticity on the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) wrist score between the higher dose BTXA and placebo groups, with a mean difference in the area under the curve (AUC) of -6.830 (<i>p</i><0.001, t test). The MAS wrist score further decreased from baseline in all repeat treatment cycles of BTXA in the open-label phase. No clinically relevant difference was noted in the frequency of treatment-related adverse events between BTXA-treated and placebo-treated patients during the study period. Conclusions : BTXA injections reduced spasticity in the upper limb muscles from the first treatment with continued long-term efficacy. Our results suggest that BTXA injections are safe and effective for the long-term treatment of post-stroke upper limb spasticity.

5.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362270

ABSTRACT

Objective : To evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) in Japanese patients with post-stroke lower limb spasticity in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, single dose, placebo-controlled study (double-blind phase) followed by an open-label, multiple dose extension (open-label phase). Methods : One hundred and twenty patients with lower limb spasticity were randomized to receive a single treatment with BTXA 300 Units (U) or placebo into lower limb muscles in the double-blind phase. Patients who met the re-injection criteria received up to 3 repeated treatments of BTXA into lower limb muscles with at least 12 weeks between treatments in the open-label phase through 48 weeks. Results : In the double-blind phase there was significant improvement from baseline spasticity in the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) ankle score between the BTXA 300U and placebo groups, with a mean difference in the area under the curve (AUC) of -3.428 (<i>p</i>=0.006, t test). The MAS ankle score further decreased from baseline in all repeat treatment cycles of BTXA in the open-label phase. No clinically relevant difference was noted in the frequency of treatment-related adverse events between BTXA-treated and placebo-treated patients during the study period. Conclusions : BTXA reduced spasticity in lower limb muscles from the first treatment with continued long-term efficacy. BTXA is safe and effective for the long-term treatment of post-stroke lower limb spasticity.

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