Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
Add filters








Year range
1.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-936613

ABSTRACT

A 66-year-old, postmenopausal woman was referred to our hospital because of abnormal breast cancer screening results. A tumor was found in the upper outer part of the left breast. Biopsy revealed papillotubular carcinoma, ER (Allred score total score [TS] 3 = proportion score [PS] 2 + intensity score [IS] 1), PgR (Allred score TS 3 = PS 2 + IS 1), HER2 (2+), fluorescent in situ hybridization 1.1 (negative), and Ki-67 labeling index 15%. In diagnostic imaging, the tumor size was 35 mm. The diagnosis was T2N0M0 Stage IIA, luminal B-like breast cancer. First, letrozole 2.5 mg/day was administered as preoperative hormone therapy. After 2 months of treatment with letrozole, the tumor size had increased to 44 mm and preoperative hormone therapy was discontinued. She was started on preoperative chemotherapy (4 courses of epirubicin plus cyclophsphamide followed by 4 courses of triweekly docetaxel). The tumor size decreased, becoming undetectable. After these preoperative treatments, nipple-sparing mastectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and breast reconstruction with a primary latissimus dorsi flap were performed. As of 3 years and 6 months after the operation, there has been no recurrence. At first, preoperative hormone therapy is performed for Luminal B-like breast cancer as in this case, if the response is insufficient, preoperative chemotherapy after hormone therapy may be a therapeutic option.

2.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-924431

ABSTRACT

A 48-year-old woman with a history of recurrent alcoholic pancreatitis was found to have a pancreatic pseudocyst. In November 20XX, she visited the emergency department due to sudden abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a pancreatic pseudocyst with a maximum diameter of 67 mm and ascites. A ruptured pancreatic pseudocyst was suspected and abdominal paracentesis was performed. The amylase level in the ascitic fluid was high (3444 IU/L), leading to a diagnosis of acute generalized peritonitis due to rupture of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Intraoperative findings revealed 500 mL of ascites mixed with pancreatic juice and turbid cyst contents, and distal pancreatectomy was performed. The postoperative course was favorable, and the patient was discharged on hospital day 14. Rupture of pancreatic pseudocyst is rare. In this case, it was promptly diagnosed and successfully treated with emergency surgery.

3.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-906941

ABSTRACT

Primary mesenteric neuroendocrine tumor is extremely rare. Here we describe 2 cases of this disease. Case 1 was a 66-year-old man with a working diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor or mesenteric tumor who underwent laparoscopic tumor resection. Immunohistochemically, the final diagnosis was primary mesenteric neuroendocrine tumor G1. There has been no recurrence as of 25 months after surgery. Case 2 was an 80-year-old man with a working diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor or mesenteric tumor who also underwent laparoscopic tumor resection. Immunohistochemically, the final diagnosis was primary mesenteric neuroendocrine tumor G1. This is recurrence-free as of 36 months after surgery. Several cases of primary mesenteric neuroendocrine tumor have been reported, but most have been treated with open surgery. To date, there has been only 1 case of primary mesenteric NET that was resected in a pure laparoscopic procedure. In all 3 cases (including our 2 cases), the largest tumor diameter was 4 cm. It appears that laparoscopic surgery can be used to treat primary mesenteric neuroendocrine tumor of small size (< 4 cm) with minimal invasion.

4.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-886136

ABSTRACT

Here, we report 3 cases of conservatively treated ischemic colitis with hepatic portal venous gas. In Case 1, an 84-year-old man visited the emergency department because of fatigue, vomiting, and upper abdominal pain. In Case 2, a 72-year-old man was hospitalized for rehabilitation in another hospital following cervical spine trauma. He had diarrhea and mesogastric pain for 2 days and was transferred to our hospital. In Case 3, an 89-year-old woman visited the emergency department because of upper abdominal pain and vomiting. In all cases, we diagnosed the illness as ischemic colitis with hepatic portal venous gas based on computed tomography findings, and the vital signs of all patients were stable. They were treated conservatively. They were able to resume oral intake and were discharged or transferred to another hospital. Hepatic portal venous gas has been considered a poor prognostic sign of severe diseases such as intestinal necrosis. However, recently, reports of cases treated conservatively have been increasing. Conservative treatment may be selected for ischemic colitis associated with hepatic portal venous gas taking into account the patient’s general condition.

5.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887300

ABSTRACT

A 14-year-old girl (Case 1) with respiratory distress during exercise was referred to our department after a pancreatic mass was detected by computed tomography (CT). Contrastenhanced CT scan showed a low-density mass measuring 2.5 × 2 cm in the body of the pancreas. Low signal intensity was seen on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI. We suspected solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas and performed laparoscopy-assisted spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged on postoperative day 13. A 15-yearold girl (Case 2) with abdominal pain and fever was referred to our department after an abdominal cystic mass was detected by ultrasound examination. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a 4-cm well-circumscribed mass. Higher signal intensity was seen on T2-weighted MRI. We suspected SPN of the pancreas and performed laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged on postoperative day 8. Laparoscopic or laparoscopy-assisted surgery should be considered for SPN of the pancreas.

6.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-826029

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to compare the results of open surgery and laparoscopic surgery for acute appendicitis in adults. In 2013, we primarily selected open surgery for acute appendicitis, but in 2017 we opted to select mainly laparoscopic surgery. We compared between 92 patients who had undergone open surgery in 2013 and 88 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery group in 2017. There was no difference in age, sex, body mass index, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, or perforation rate on computed tomography between the two groups. The laparoscopic surgery group had significantly longer operation time but significantly lower blood loss and postoperative complication rate. In particular, laparoscopic surgery was advantageous in terms of hemostasis for moderate bleeding. The results suggest that laparoscopic surgery may be more useful in adult appendicitis than open surgery.

7.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-829783

ABSTRACT

The patient was a 52-year-old woman who had undergone laparoscopic colectomy with lymph node dissection and inferior mesenteric artery preservation for cancer of the descending colon. Functional end-to-end anastomosis was performed using a linear stapler. Colonoscopy at the 1-year follow-up revealed a type 2 tumor at the anastomotic site. She was diagnosed with anastomotic recurrence. We performed laparoscopic high anterior resection with inferior mesenteric artery dissection. Rectal resection preceded mobilization of the mesocolon because of severe adhesion around the anastomotic site. Laparoscopic surgery for anastomotic site recurrence is an option under the condition that the initial surgery was laparoscopic.

8.
Palliative Care Research ; : 523-528, 2013.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-374769

ABSTRACT

<b>Introduction</b>: There has been no case report in which hyperpigmentation developed on the skin area where a transdermal fentanyl patch was applied in a patient. <b>Case report</b>: A 43-year-old man with recurrence of postoperative rectal cancer was treated by cetuximab plus irinotecan and panitumumab plus FOLFIRI. For cancer pain, transdermal fentanyl patch (Fentos®) was administered, and radiation from behind was performed. Hyperpigmentation then appeared on the chest and the abdominal skin sites where the patches were applied. The hyperpigmentation nearly disappeared four months after the fentanyl patch was discontinued. <b>Discussion</b>: The cause of the pigmentation was possibly due to post inflammatory hyperpigmentation secondary to contact dermatitis. It was desirable to conduct patch test and skin biopsy for making an accurate diagnosis. <b>Conclusion</b>: We should pay a careful attention to hyperpigmentation of the skin where a transdermal fentanyl patch is applied.

9.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-374473

ABSTRACT

  This case is a 56-year-old woman. With multiple bone metastases, she was referred to the Department of Palliative Care on the same day as core needle biopsy had just been performed in the Department of Surgery. Aggressively increased oxycodone was administered to relieve her significantly severe pains by bone metastases. After relief of the pains, cancer chemotherapy of EC and weekly PTX regimens were performed parallel to palliative care. In this case, chemotherapy could be performed after the pains had been sufficiently relieved with closer cooperation between the palliative care doctor and the attending surgeon. It is important for patient-focused medical care to be delivered by both the attending doctor administering cancer treatment and the palliative care doctor working for relief of the symptoms, while they are striving to foster their tie-up.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL