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1.
Intestinal Research ; : 313-320, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-937726

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Restorative proctocolectomy (RPC) with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis and handsewn anastomosis for ulcerative colitis requires pulling down of the ileal pouch into the pelvis, which can be technically challenging. We examined risk factors for the pouch not reaching the anus. @*Methods@#Clinical records of 62 consecutive patients who were scheduled to undergo RPC with handsewn anastomosis at the University of Tokyo Hospital during 1989–2019 were reviewed. Risk factors for non-reaching were analyzed in patients in whom hand sewing was abandoned for stapled anastomosis because of nonreaching. Risk factors for non-reaching in laparoscopic RPC were separately analyzed. Anatomical indicators obtained from presurgical computed tomography (CT) were also evaluated. @*Results@#Thirty-seven of 62 cases underwent laparoscopic procedures. In 6 cases (9.7%), handsewn anastomosis was changed to stapled anastomosis because of non-reaching. Male sex and a laparoscopic approach were independent risk factors of non-reaching. Distance between the terminal of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) ileal branch and the anus > 11 cm was a risk factor for non-reaching. @*Conclusions@#Laparoscopic RPC with handsewn anastomosis may limit extension and induction of the ileal pouch into the anus. Preoperative CT measurement from the terminal SMA to the anus may be useful for predicting non-reaching.

2.
Annals of Dermatology ; : 624-628, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-129788

ABSTRACT

Treatment of perianal and vulvar extramammary Paget disease (EMPD), rare intraepithelial malignancies, is often challenging because of its potential to spread into the anal canal. However, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal resection margin within the anal canal. Between 2004 and 2014, six patients (three with perianal EMPD and three with vulvar EMPD) in which the spread of Paget cells into the anal canal was highly suspected were referred to our department. To evaluate the disease extent within the anal canal, preoperative mapping biopsy of the anal canal was performed in five out of six patients. Two patients were positive for Paget cells within the anal canal (one at the dentate line and the other at 0.5 cm above the dentate line), whereas in three patients, Paget cell were present only in the skin of the anal verge. Using 1 cm margin within the anal canal from the positive biopsy sites, we performed anal-preserving wide local excision (WLE), and negative resection margins within the anal canal were confirmed in all five patients. The remaining one patient with perianal EMPD did not undergo mapping biopsy of the anal canal because preoperative colonoscopy revealed that the Paget cells had spread into the lower rectum. Therefore, WLE with abdominoperineal resection was performed. During the median follow-up period of 37.3 months, no local recurrence was observed in all patients. Our small case series suggest the usefulness of mapping biopsy of the anal canal for the treatment of perianal and vulvar EMPD.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anal Canal , Biopsy , Colonoscopy , Consensus , Follow-Up Studies , Paget Disease, Extramammary , Rectum , Recurrence , Skin
3.
Annals of Dermatology ; : 624-628, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-129773

ABSTRACT

Treatment of perianal and vulvar extramammary Paget disease (EMPD), rare intraepithelial malignancies, is often challenging because of its potential to spread into the anal canal. However, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal resection margin within the anal canal. Between 2004 and 2014, six patients (three with perianal EMPD and three with vulvar EMPD) in which the spread of Paget cells into the anal canal was highly suspected were referred to our department. To evaluate the disease extent within the anal canal, preoperative mapping biopsy of the anal canal was performed in five out of six patients. Two patients were positive for Paget cells within the anal canal (one at the dentate line and the other at 0.5 cm above the dentate line), whereas in three patients, Paget cell were present only in the skin of the anal verge. Using 1 cm margin within the anal canal from the positive biopsy sites, we performed anal-preserving wide local excision (WLE), and negative resection margins within the anal canal were confirmed in all five patients. The remaining one patient with perianal EMPD did not undergo mapping biopsy of the anal canal because preoperative colonoscopy revealed that the Paget cells had spread into the lower rectum. Therefore, WLE with abdominoperineal resection was performed. During the median follow-up period of 37.3 months, no local recurrence was observed in all patients. Our small case series suggest the usefulness of mapping biopsy of the anal canal for the treatment of perianal and vulvar EMPD.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anal Canal , Biopsy , Colonoscopy , Consensus , Follow-Up Studies , Paget Disease, Extramammary , Rectum , Recurrence , Skin
4.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-366184

ABSTRACT

An 80-year-old male patient had complained of left abdominal pain since 1990, and an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) 5.3cm in diameter was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). The patient was NYHA class III with complaints of chest pain during exercise. Coronary arteriography showed that he had three-vessel disease. At that time, aneurysmectomy was not anticipated due to his age and because the AAA showed no tendency to enlarge. However, in October 1993, CT showed that the AAA rapidly enlarged to 6.8cm in diameter. Due to the greater risk of rupture of the AAA, aneurysmectomy was considered necessary. The operative mortality associated with aneurysmectomy in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is higher than that in patients without CAD. Therefore, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) was indicated prior to aneurysmectomy. The patient underwent CABG (two vessels) in December 1993, and aneurysmectomy was successfully performed in February 1994. He was discharged uneventfully 17 days after the operation.

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