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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-873744

ABSTRACT

Objective To explore the mechanism of the intestinal barrier damage caused by Blastocystis hominis infections in rats. Methods Thirty SD rats were randomly divided into the control group, and the 1-, 3-, 6- and 9-week-infection groups, of 6 rats in each group. Rats in each infection group were orally infected with B. hominis trophozoites at a density of 2 × 108 parasites per rat, and the control group was given an equal volume of phosphate buffered saline solution. The 7-hour urine samples were collected 1, 3, 6 and 9 weeks post-infection for the measurement of the intestinal permeability. Then, rats were sacrificed using the cervical dislocation method, and the cecum specimens were collected for the detection of the intestinal epithelial cell permeability. The expression of tight junction-related Occludin and Claudin - 1 genes and apoptosis-related Bcl - 2 and Bax genes was quantified in cecum epithelial cells using the real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay, and cell apoptosis was detected in the rat cecum using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results The median urinary lactolose to mannitol ratios were 0.29, 0.72, 0.44, 0.46 and 0.38 in the control group, and the 1-, 3-, 6- and 9-week-infection groups, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (H = 12.09, P < 0.05). B. hominis invasion and epithelial injury were observed in intestinal epithelial cells of rats infected with B. hominis, and transmission electron microscopy displayed the destruction of tight junctions between intestinal epithelial cells. The relative expression of Occludin, Claudin-1, Bcl-2 and Bax genes was 1.04, 0.62, 0.71, 0.68 and 0.96; 1.03, 0.61, 0.63, 0.76 and 0.86; 1.08, 0.70, 0.75, 0.74 and 1.03; and 1.00, 1.57, 1.33, 1.35 and 1.10 in the control group and the 1-, 3-, 6- and 9-week-infection groups, respectively, and all differences were statistically significant (F = 2.86, 2.85, 3.37 and 4.45, all P values < 0.05). The median number of positive staining cells were 1.00, 13.00, 9.00, 3.50 and 1.00 in rat cecum specimens in the control group, and the 1-, 3-, 6- and 9-week-infection groups, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (H = 22.95, P < 0.01). Conclusion B. hominis infection may cause an increase in the rat intestinal permeability through triggering the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells to destroy the tight junction between intestinal epithelial cells, thereby destroying the intestinal barrier function.

2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880119

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To detecte the carrying rate, the type and distribution of α-Thalassemia gene mutation in Honghe Prefecture, Yunnan Province, and analyze the differences in average erythrocyte volume (MCV), mean erythrocyte hemoglobin content (MCH) and hemoglobin among different types of α-Thalassemia.@*METHODS@#The DNA samples from small cell hypochromic carriers or anemia patients and women of childbearing age who underwent hematological screening in The First People's Hospital of Honghe State was from 2015 to 2019 were enrolled and analyzed, and the mutation types and frequency of alpha-thalassemia positive rate were diagnosed by PCR reverse dot blot or PCR fluorescence dissolution curve.@*RESULTS@#Among the 1 016 samples, 141(13.88%) of the patients were diagnosed as α-thalassemia. The α-thalassemia was subdivided into 3 types, silent (36.17%), minor (51.77%), and HbH disease (12.06%), and the MCV, MCH and HB levels were detected and showed a obvious decrease trend with significant difference (P < 0.05). The gene mutation types were 9 kinds, the deletion type gene was mainly --SEA (51.06%), followed by -α@*CONCLUSION@#Alpha-thalassemia in Honghe prefecture of Yunnan Province shows complex genetic diversity and significant genetic heterogeneity, and the mainly type of gene mutation is --SEA and --


Subject(s)
China , Female , Genotype , Heterozygote , Humans , Mutation , alpha-Thalassemia/genetics , beta-Thalassemia
3.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-690118

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study the clinical features of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and its treatment regimens in children.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The samples of throat swab or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected from 136 children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect 2063/2064 A:G mutation in 23S rRNA, and according to such results, the children were divided into drug-resistance group with 81 children and sensitive group with 55 children. The two groups were compared in terms of age composition, respiratory symptoms, extrapulmonary complications, laboratory markers, imaging changes, treatment regimens, and length of hospital stay.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Compared with the sensitive group, the drug-resistance group had significantly longer duration of pyrexia and severe fever, a significantly higher percentage of children with reduced blood oxygen saturation, and significantly higher levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (P<0.05). The conventional azithromycin treatment had a good clinical effect in the sensitive group, while corticosteroid therapy was usually needed in the drug-resistance group.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection cannot be identified based on a single clinical feature, but prolonged duration of pyrexia and severe fever, reduced blood oxygen saturation, and increased ALT and LDH can suggest the presence of this disease. Azithromycin combined with glucocorticoids may be a good treatment regimen for children with macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.</p>

4.
Chinese Journal of Pathology ; (12): 451-454, 2013.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-233423

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the expression of glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) and desmin in benign and malignant mesothelial lesions, including reactive mesothelial hyperplasia (RMH), epithelioid malignant mesothelioma (EMM) and metastatic adenocarcinoma (MAC).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>One hundred and forty two pleural biopsy specimens were collected in this study, including 58 cases of RMH, 53 cases of EMM and 31 cases of MAC. Immunohistochemical EliVision method was performed to detect GLUT-1 and desmin expression.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The positive rates for GLUT-1 in RMH, EMM and MAC were 13.8% (8/58) , 81.1% (43/53) and 77.4% (24/31) , respectively, with statistically significant differences between RMH and others (both P < 0.01). The positive rates for desmin in RMH, EMM and MAC were 77.6% (45/58) , 9.4% (5/53) and 0 (0/31) , respectively, with statistically significant difference between RMH and others (both P < 0.01). The combined expression pattern of positive GLUT-1 and negative desmin was found in 1 (1.7%, 1/58) RMH cases, 41 (77.4%, 41/53) EMM cases and 24 (77.4%, 24/31) MAC cases, with statistically significant difference between RMH and others (both P < 0.01).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>GLUT-1 and desmin may be used as immunohistochemical markers in separating RMH from EMM. Combined application of two antibodies may improve the specificity.</p>


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Desmin , Metabolism , Diagnosis, Differential , Epithelium , Metabolism , Pathology , Glucose Transporter Type 1 , Metabolism , Humans , Hyperplasia , Immunohistochemistry , Mesothelioma , Metabolism , Pathology , Pleura , Metabolism , Pathology , Pleural Neoplasms , Metabolism , Pathology
5.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-284032

ABSTRACT

The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML), encoded by PML gene, plays a tumor suppressor in acute promyelocytic leukemia and other hematologic malignancies. Recent evidence indicates that PML involves in regulating multiple cell biological function, regulates self-renewal and maintains stable function in stem cell/cancer stem cell of multiple tissues, leading to drug resistance of cancer. This review summarizes the latest research advances about the relationship and therapeutic options between PML and cancer stem cell of hematologic neoplasms, aiming to propose a new avenue for blood cancer treatment.


Subject(s)
Hematologic Neoplasms , Blood , Humans , Neoplastic Stem Cells , Nuclear Proteins , Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein , Transcription Factors , Tumor Suppressor Proteins
6.
Chinese Journal of Pathology ; (12): 16-19, 2012.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-242006

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the clinicopathologic features of pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The clinical and pathologic profiles of 2 PCH cases were evaluated. Immunohistochemical study (EnVision method) was performed on fixed tissues. The biologic behavior was analyzed with follow-up data.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The main presenting symptom was dyspnea. Chest radiography of the two cases depicted diffuse, ground-glass nodules, accompanied by enlarged central pulmonary arteries. Microscopically, the most distinctive feature was proliferation of capillary channels within pulmonary interstitium and alveolar walls, accompanied by muscularization of arterioles. Immunohistochemical study showed an abundance of mast cells in the lesion, and staining for platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFR-β) localized to vascular smooth muscles surrounding the proliferating capillaries and the mast cells. The index of Ki-67 was less than 1 percent and the p53 was negative.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>PCH is a rare vascular proliferative disease of yang patients. Increased number of mast cell and the up-regulation of PDGFR-β may suggest mechanism for PCH. The clinical and radiologic diagnosis of PCH can be very difficult, and the histological examination is regarded as the most reliable means to establish the diagnosis. Pathologists should improve their knowledge on PCH.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hemangioma, Capillary , Diagnostic Imaging , Metabolism , Pathology , Humans , Hypertension, Pulmonary , Lung Neoplasms , Diagnostic Imaging , Metabolism , Pathology , Male , Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 , Metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit , Metabolism , Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta , Metabolism , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
7.
Chinese Journal of Pathology ; (12): 29-32, 2007.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-268849

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the application of flow cytometry in diagnosis of T-cell rich diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Histopathologic features, immunohistochemical findings and flow cytometry results of three cases of T-cell rich diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were reviewed retrospectively.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>In CD45-side scatter (SSC) dot plot of the first patient, two different CD45-positive lymphoid cell populations were identified. The bright population consisted of both T and B cells, with a T-cell predominance. The dim population consisted mainly of B cells which showed lambda light chain restriction. In the second patient, CD45-positive cells were subdivided into two groups according to CD45-SSC dot plot. The small population consisted of both T and B cells, with a T-cell predominance. The large population consisted mainly of B cells which showed kappa light chain restriction. In the third patient, CD19-positive cells were subdivided into two groups according to the expression of CD20 in CD19-CD20 dot plot. The CD20-positive population expressed both kappa and lambda light chains, while the CD20-negative population demonstrated kappa light chain restriction.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Neoplastic B cells can be distinguished from reactive lymphoid cells in T-cell rich diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by flow cytometry, according to a number of parameters which include intensity of antigen expression, loss of antigens, expression of non-B-cell lineage antigens, patterns of forward scatter (FSC) and/or SSC, and expression of immature B-cell antigens.</p>


Subject(s)
Aged , Antigens, CD19 , Metabolism , Antigens, CD20 , Metabolism , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Flow Cytometry , Methods , Humans , Immunoglobulin lambda-Chains , Metabolism , Immunohistochemistry , Leukocyte Common Antigens , Metabolism , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse , Diagnosis , Metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , T-Lymphocytes , Metabolism , Pathology
8.
Chinese Journal of Pathology ; (12): 602-605, 2006.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-268888

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate whether simian virus 40 (SV40) was related to patients of malignant mesothelioma in China.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Paraffin-embeded samples of 17 patients with malignant mesothelioma were collected. After isolation of DNA from paraffin blocks, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses were performed using three different sets of primer for detection of SV40 large T antigen gene. These samples were also immunohistochemically evaluated for expression of SV40 TAg protein with two different anti-SV40 Tag (Pab101 and Ab-2).</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Only one of the three primer pairs successfully amplified SV40 genome in three malignant mesothelioma samples. No immunopositive staining for SV40 TAg was found in any of the samples.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>The study shows that malignant mesothelioma in China may be independent of SV40 infection.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Antigens, Viral, Tumor , Genetics , Metabolism , China , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Male , Mesothelioma , Pathology , Virology , Middle Aged , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Polyomavirus Infections , Pathology , Virology , Simian virus 40 , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Physiology , Tumor Virus Infections , Pathology , Virology , Young Adult
9.
Chinese Journal of Pathology ; (12): 84-87, 2005.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-265188

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the clinicopathological features of pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (PLAM).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>By means of HE and immunohistochemistry (SP method) studies, the clinical and pathological features of 5 PLAM cases were analyzed and the related literature reviewed.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>PLAM was a rare lung disease of unknown etiology and was restricted to females who were generally pre-menopausal. Pathological features showed abnormal smooth muscle cells (LAM cells) line the airways, lymphatics and blood vesssels leading to airflow obstruction and replacement of the lung parenchyma by cysts. LAM cells were positive for HMB45. Clinically the disease was categorized by dyspnoea, haemoptysis, recurrent pneumothoraces and chylous effusions.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>PLAM should be considered when recurrent pneumothorax, haemoptysis and dyspnoea occur in females. Pathologic examination of lung tissue biopsy is required for confirmation of PLAM diagnosis.</p>


Subject(s)
Actins , Metabolism , Adult , Antigens, Neoplasm , Biopsy , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Lung , Diagnostic Imaging , Pathology , Lung Neoplasms , Diagnostic Imaging , Metabolism , Pathology , Lymphangioleiomyomatosis , Diagnostic Imaging , Metabolism , Pathology , Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 , Metabolism , Melanoma-Specific Antigens , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Proteins , Metabolism , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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