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1.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362494

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to clarify physical characteristics related to low back pain (LBP) in collegiate track and field athletes. We particularly focused on the nature of the track and field. The subjects were 21 male collegiate track and field athletes including only sprinters, hurdlers, long jumpers and triple jumpers. The examined parameters were physical characteristics, isokinetic flexor and extensor strength in the knee and trunk regions. The evaluation of LBP was estimated by a questionnaire test and orthopedic surgeons' diagnosis. According to these evaluations, we divided all track and field athletes into two groups ; LBP group (n=11, 52.4%) and no LBP group (n=10, 47.6%). As a result, a take-off leg of knee flexor/extensor strength ratio in the LBP group was significantly lower than that in the no LBP group (<i>P</i><0.05). The LBP group showed a significant difference between a take-off leg and a lead leg in knee flexor strength compared with the no LBP group (<i>P</i><0.05). The LBP group has been short engaged in the track and field than the no LBP group (<i>P</i><0.05). In the trunk flexor and extensor strength, there was no significant difference between the LBP and the no LBP group in this study. These results suggest that the imbalanced knee muscle strength may be one of some factors related to chronic low back pain in collegiate track and field athletes.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-379097

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of two kinds of neck muscle training on the isometric cervical extension strength (ICES) and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the neck extensor muscles.The subjects which were examined consisted of 22 male college judo athletes. Each was assigned to one of three groups: shrug and upright rowing training (SU); shrug, upright rowing and dynamic neck muscle training (COM); and control (CONT). The SU and COM groups trained 3 days per week for 9 weeks. The ICES and CSA of the neck muscles were measured before and after muscle training.The ICES of the COM group showed a significant increase after training. For the CSA, although a significant increase was only found in a superficial area of the neck extensor muscles in the SU group, the COM group showed significant increases in all areas.This study determined that combined neck muscle training is effective for developing the neck extensor muscles.

3.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362339

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of dynamic neck muscle training using a cervical extension machine (CEM) on isometric cervical extension strength (ICES) and a cross-sectional area of neck extensor muscles.Subjects were 18 male college judo athletes divided into a control group (n=10) and training group (n=8), respectively. In the training group, dynamic neck muscle training was performed for a 6 week training period, followed by a 10 week training period. There was a detraining period of 12 weeks between the first training period and the second. The ICES was measured at eight angles using a CEM, and the neck muscle cross-sectional area was determined using magnetic resonance imaging.The ICES and cross-sectional area of neck extensor muscles in the training group showed significant increases after the second training period. In particular, the increase in the cross-sectional area was greater in the deepest layer of the neck extensor muscles (rotator, multifidus and semispinaris cervicis muscles) than in the superficial layer (trapezius muscle). In the control group, no significant changes in ICES or cross-sectional area were observed.In conclusion, it was shown that dynamic neck muscle training using a CEM was effective in developing both ICES and the cross-sectional area of neck extensor muscles, especially in the deepest layer.

4.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-372124

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate characteristics of past injuries of female university soccer players in comparison with injuries in male university soccer players.<BR>We investigated past injuries of female players (n=32) and male players (n=24) . A past injury was defined as any injury sustained during soccer that required admission to a team doctor, medical attention or absence from practices or games for more than seven days.<BR>The most frequent injury was Joint Injuries in both female and male players. High occurrence of overuse injuries of lower leg was most apparent in the female players. The 32 female players had experienced 144 injuries, or 4.5 injuries per player, and the 24 male players had suffered 85 injuries, or 3.5 injuries per player. The numbers of injuries per player of female players were 1.3 times higher than the male players. Also, the incidence of injury was 0.64 (injury/player/year) in female players, and 0.27 (injury/player/year) in male players. The incidence of injury of female players was significantly larger than that of male players.<BR>We conclude that the prevention and care of overuse injuries in lower leg is very important for female succor players.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-372110

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships of ankle ligamentous injuries with physical and positional characteristics in college football players. Specific hypothesis was addressed whether medial ankle ligamentous complex (MALC) injury was often caused by oversized players, offensive or defensive linemen.<BR>53 subjects participated in this study. We examined their previous history of ankle ligamentous injuries and classified them into three groups: (1) the lateral ankle ligamentous complex (LALC) in-jury group; (2) the MALC injury group; and (3) the no ankle ligamentous (NAL) injury group. Regarding MALC injury, we obtained the following results. First, MALC injury occupied 35% of total ankle ligamentous injuries. Second, both body weight and BMI of the MALC injury group were signi-ficantly the heaviest and largest of the groups. Lastly, OL, LB, and DL occupied highest occurring percentage (75%) of MALC injury.<BR>We concluded that MALC injury tended to be incurred by the players with heavier body weight and/or larger BMI. Players OL, LB, or DL also suffered MALC injury. Thus, these results suggest that body weight, BMI and position are considered as the risk factor for MALC injury.

6.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-372029

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between low back pain (LBP) and psychological conditions in university wrestlers.<BR>We examined psychological conditions of seventy male university wrestlers using the Psycholo gical Condition Inventory (PCI) test and evaluated whether psychological conditions have some relationships with LBP. Evaluations of LBP were based on a questionnaire test and the diagnosis of orthopedic surgeons. Based on the LBP evaluation, we assigned all wrestlers into two groups as the LBP group and the non-LBP group.<BR>We obtained the following results. There were twenty-eight university wrestlers (40%) in the LBP group and forty-two wrestlers (60%) in the non-LBP group. Wrestlers in the LBP group showed significantly high values in all factors relating to fatigue in comparison to the non-LBP group.<BR>We conclud that the university wrestlers with LBP feel fatigue in their minds and bodies.

7.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-372011

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between low back pain (LBP) any physical characteristics in university wrestlers. We especially focused on radiological abnormalitie (RA) in their lumbar regions.<BR>Physical characteristics and isokinetic trunk muscle strength of the 55 male university wrestlers were measured. MRI was used to evaluate the cross-sectional areas of trunk muscles between lumbar spine 3 and 4 (L3/4) . Evaluations of LBP were based on the diagnose of orthopedic surgeons and the questionnaire test. According to this evaluation, we assigned all wrestlers into two groups as the LOP group and the no LOP group. Furthermore, four groups were defined by having RA based on X-ray and MRI diagnose.<BR>We obtained the following results. In comparison between the LOP group and the no LOP group, the trunk muscle extension flexion strength ratio of the LOP was significantly lower than that of the no LOP group. In addition, the LOP without RA group showed significant low strength of their trunk extensors in comparison with the no LOP without RA group.<BR>We considered that the relative low strength of trunk extensors should have some effect on LBP in university wrestlers.

8.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-371945

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to analyze the body characteristics of university soccer players, especially the hip joint and pelvis where chronic injuries frequently occur among soccer players.<BR>Body characteristics of seventy male university soccer players were surveyed by an orthopedic medical check. The Micro FET value (MF) was used as the unique test for the potential stress on the pubic symphysis. MF was defined as the pressure value at which a subject claimed tenderness from compression on the pubic symphysis.<BR>Among the various tests of the orthopedic medical check, trunk extension in the prone position and external rotation of the hip joint in the standing position correlated with MF. The same tendencies were observed in soccer players with pubic symphysitis.<BR>Results indicate that these three simple tests : MF, trunk extension in the prone position and external rotation of the hip joint in the standing position, can be used as valuable indices for detecting pubic symphysitis in the early stages.

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