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1.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362526

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE : The purpose of this study is to compare sagittal spinal alignment and mobility among standing and sitting (which are fundamental postures in daily activities), and four point kneeling (FPK: the imitation of quadrupedal animal posture).METHODS : Fifty three healthy young men have participated in this study. Spinal alignment is measured using a non-invasive skin surface measurement device (Spinal Mouse®: Index Ltd, Japan). The spinal alignment is measured in 3 positions: upright, flexion, and extension, in each posture (standing, sitting, and FPK), and then the thoracic and lumbar curvature and sacral slope are analyzed.RESULTS : Even between 2 fundamental positions, upright standing and sitting, the lumbar lordosis is statistically different (17.1±8.9° at upright standing, 3.5±10.0° at upright sitting, p<0.001). But the sacral slope is not different between those 2 positions. The lumbo-pelvic rhythm (lumbar-hip or lumbar-pelvis flexion ratio) is also different among the 3 postures, especially in FPK posture. In this posture the lumbar spine and pelvis (sacrum) move to opposite direction each other; this phenomenon is not observed at standing and sitting postures. CONCLUSION : The spinal alignment and mobility are different in many segments among standing, sitting, and FPK.

2.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-371945

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to analyze the body characteristics of university soccer players, especially the hip joint and pelvis where chronic injuries frequently occur among soccer players.<BR>Body characteristics of seventy male university soccer players were surveyed by an orthopedic medical check. The Micro FET value (MF) was used as the unique test for the potential stress on the pubic symphysis. MF was defined as the pressure value at which a subject claimed tenderness from compression on the pubic symphysis.<BR>Among the various tests of the orthopedic medical check, trunk extension in the prone position and external rotation of the hip joint in the standing position correlated with MF. The same tendencies were observed in soccer players with pubic symphysitis.<BR>Results indicate that these three simple tests : MF, trunk extension in the prone position and external rotation of the hip joint in the standing position, can be used as valuable indices for detecting pubic symphysitis in the early stages.

3.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-376857

ABSTRACT

To investigate effects of 1, 300 meters altitude on swimming training, several physiologic parameters were examined in eight female high school swimmers before, during and after living and training for six days at 1, 300 meters altitude.<BR>Variables included peak heart rate (peakHR), rate of perceived exhaustion (RPE) and blood lactate concentration (BLa) associated with 200m swimming at submaximal and maximal speeds were measured 2-3 days before, during and 1-2 days after altitude exposure. Blood samples were collected before, during and after altitude exposure.<BR>On day 1 of altitude exposure, peakHR and RPE at submaximal speeds increased from pre-altitude values while BLa didn't change. At maximal speed, swimming speed and BLa decreased, RPE increased, and peakHR didn't change from pre-altitude.<BR>During altitude exposure, for the first three days of altiude exposure for peakHR and for all six days for RPE, the same submaximal speeds elicited greater values than pre-altitude.<BR>Post-altitude BLa at submaximal speeds was reduced compared to pre-altitude. Maximal heart rate, RPE, and BLa at maximal speed didn't change pre- to post-altitude. However, mean values of them decreased from pre-altitude.<BR>Erythropoietin was elevated above pre-altitude on day 2, and reticulocytes increased post-altitude significantly from pre-altitude.<BR>These results indicate that the relative workload increased during the training at 1, 300 meters. There also appeared to be some stimulation for erythropoiesis.<BR>In summary, this study found that 1, 300 meters altitude increased the difficulty of swimming training and six days at 1, 300 meters produced mild stimulation of erythropoiesis in these female swimmers

4.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-371874

ABSTRACT

To investigate effects of 1, 300 meters altitude on swimming training, several physiologic parameters were examined in eight female high school swimmers before, during and after living and training for six days at 1, 300 meters altitude.<BR>Variables included peak heart rate (peakHR), rate of perceived exhaustion (RPE) and blood lactate concentration (BLa) associated with 200m swimming at submaximal and maximal speeds were measured 2-3 days before, during and 1-2 days after altitude exposure. Blood samples were collected before, during and after altitude exposure.<BR>On day 1 of altitude exposure, peakHR and RPE at submaximal speeds increased from pre-altitude values while BLa didn't change. At maximal speed, swimming speed and BLa decreased, RPE increased, and peakHR didn't change from pre-altitude.<BR>During altitude exposure, for the first three days of altiude exposure for peakHR and for all six days for RPE, the same submaximal speeds elicited greater values than pre-altitude.<BR>Post-altitude BLa at submaximal speeds was reduced compared to pre-altitude. Maximal heart rate, RPE, and BLa at maximal speed didn't change pre- to post-altitude. However, mean values of them decreased from pre-altitude.<BR>Erythropoietin was elevated above pre-altitude on day 2, and reticulocytes increased post-altitude significantly from pre-altitude.<BR>These results indicate that the relative workload increased during the training at 1, 300 meters. There also appeared to be some stimulation for erythropoiesis.<BR>In summary, this study found that 1, 300 meters altitude increased the difficulty of swimming training and six days at 1, 300 meters produced mild stimulation of erythropoiesis in these female swimmers

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