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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-100612

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This is a retrospective study aimed at clarifying the details of recurrence patterns and sites in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT). METHODS: Data were analyzed from consecutive patients, admitted to the University of Tokyo Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) between 2001 and 2013, who had received definitive RT, with or without chemotherapy, for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB-IVA cervical cancer. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-seven patients formed the patient cohort. The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 57.0 months. A complete response was achieved in 121 patients (88%). Of these, 36 (30%) developed a cancer recurrence during follow-up. The first sites of recurrence were located in intra-RT fields in nine, outside RT fields in 20, and both in seven patients. In the intra-RT field group, all patients showed a local recurrence, while no one experienced an isolated pelvic lymph node (PLN) recurrence. In the outside RT field group, the most frequent site of recurrence was lung (60%), and three-quarters of patients were free from intra-RT field recurrence until the last follow-up. Of the entire cohort, including 48 PLN-positive patients, only seven patients (5.1%) developed PLN persistence or recurrence, all in the common iliac, internal iliac, and/or obturator nodes, and all with another synchronous relapse. CONCLUSION: Local disease was a major type of intra-RT field recurrence, while PLN control was favorable even in initially PLN-positive patients. The predominance of outside RT field recurrence alone highlights issues concerning distant control, including the intensity enhancement of systematic therapy.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Adenocarcinoma/drug therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Brachytherapy , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/drug therapy , Chemoradiotherapy , Disease-Free Survival , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Follow-Up Studies , Lung Neoplasms/secondary , Lymphatic Metastasis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Pelvis , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/drug therapy
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-215553

ABSTRACT

Histiocytic sarcoma in the liver is an extremely rare hematological malignancy. Herein, we reported the case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with characteristic wedge-shaped abnormality bounded by hepatic veins on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the liver. In the wedge-shaped area, decreased portal flow and the deposition of iron were observed. These imaging findings are consistent with intrasinusoidal tumor cell infiltration. A liver biopsy was performed, and histiocytic sarcoma was confirmed histopathologically.


Subject(s)
Aged , Female , Humans , Biopsy , Hematologic Neoplasms , Hepatic Veins , Histiocytic Sarcoma , Iron , Liver , Magnetic Resonance Imaging
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-22490

ABSTRACT

Computed tomography (CT) is widely used in postmortem investigations as an adjunct to the traditional autopsy in forensic medicine. To date, several studies have described postmortem CT findings as being caused by normal postmortem changes. However, on interpretation, postmortem CT findings that are seemingly due to normal postmortem changes initially, may not have been mere postmortem artifacts. In this pictorial essay, we describe the common postmortem CT findings in cases of atraumatic in-hospital death and describe the diagnostic pitfalls of normal postmortem changes that can mimic real pathologic lesions.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Autopsy/instrumentation , Brain/pathology , Forensic Medicine/instrumentation , Gastrointestinal Tract/pathology , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Myocardium/pathology , Postmortem Changes , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-72936

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Many studies have reported pre-processing effects for brain volumetry; however, no study has investigated whether non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) correction processing results in reduced system dependency when using an atlas-based method. To address this shortcoming, the present study assessed whether N3 correction processing provides reduced system dependency in atlas-based volumetry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Contiguous sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were obtained from 21 healthy participants, by using five magnetic resonance protocols. After image preprocessing using the Statistical Parametric Mapping 5 software, we measured the structural volume of the segmented images with the WFU-PickAtlas software. We applied six different bias-correction levels (Regularization 10, Regularization 0.0001, Regularization 0, Regularization 10 with N3, Regularization 0.0001 with N3, and Regularization 0 with N3) to each set of images. The structural volume change ratio (%) was defined as the change ratio (%) = (100 x [measured volume - mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols] / mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols) for each bias-correction level. RESULTS: A low change ratio was synonymous with lower system dependency. The results showed that the images with the N3 correction had a lower change ratio compared with those without the N3 correction. CONCLUSION: The present study is the first atlas-based volumetry study to show that the precision of atlas-based volumetry improves when using N3-corrected images. Therefore, correction for signal intensity non-uniformity is strongly advised for multi-scanner or multi-site imaging trials.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Atlases as Topic , Brain Mapping/methods , Image Enhancement/methods , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Software , Statistics, Nonparametric
5.
Korean Journal of Urology ; : 879-881, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-207006

ABSTRACT

A 63-year-old male patient visited our hospital with a right incidental renal tumor, which was found by ultrasonography for the follow-up study of chronic hepatitis B virus infection and diabetes mellitus. Consecutive computed tomography revealed a right renal tumor and two left adrenal tumors. Further systemic imaging study and hormonal examination suggested one right renal cell carcinoma and left adrenal metastases. We performed right nephrectomy and left adrenalectomy. The pathological diagnoses of all resected tumors were renal cell carcinoma. The patient has been in good health without any recurrence for 12 months since the operation. In patients with renal cell carcinoma, contralateral adrenal metastasis is usually associated with multiple metastases to other organs. There are a few cases of solitary and synchronous contralateral adrenal metastasis in the English literature. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of renal cell carcinoma with double synchronous contralateral adrenal metastases.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Adrenal Glands , Adrenalectomy , Carcinoma, Renal Cell , Diabetes Mellitus , Follow-Up Studies , Hepatitis B, Chronic , Neoplasm Metastasis , Neoplasms, Multiple Primary , Nephrectomy , Recurrence , Viruses
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