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1.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-887317

ABSTRACT

A 95-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for rehabilitation after a subarachnoid hemorrhage, but her physical function deteriorated due to repeated aspiration pneumonia. On the first day of the illness, a painless erythema appeared on the right elbow fossa, and expanded soon afterwards. She developed a fever of unknown origin, which led us to the diagnosis of generalized herpes zoster by using a rapid diagnostic kit. The patient was placed in a private room to prevent nosocomial infection, and we took contact infection prevention measures, such as, restricting the number of staff in the room. Antiviral drugs were administered to the patient, quickly relieving her fever. The erythema became encrusted in about 2 weeks, and private room management was terminated.Recently, due the start of periodic vaccination, the incidence of varicella has decreased;however, the increasing incidence of herpes zoster infections among the elderly remains a concern, since the onset of herpes zoster infections is inhibited by the booster effect of contact with varicella patients. Many patients are at a high risk for herpes zoster in convalescent rehabilitation wards due to the long-term admission of elderly patients with underlying diseases. Because more patients with severe herpes zoster are expected in convalescent rehabilitation wards in the future, we herein reexamine the management of such patients from the perspective of early diagnosis, nosocomial infection prevention measures, and prevention of herpes zoster onset.

2.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-688562

ABSTRACT

Objective:The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and predictive validity of the Judgement checklist for beneficial falls (hereafter called “Judgement checklist”) in stroke patients.Methods:Five raters evaluated the Judgement checklist for 20 fallers with stroke, and two raters reevaluated the same patients. Fleiss' Kappa and Cohen's Kappa for examination of inter-rater and intra-rater reliability were calculated. For predictive validity, beneficial fallers were identified from among 123 fallers with stroke, using the Judgement checklist. We compared the incidence rate of recurrent falls and motor Functional Independence Measure (FIM) in beneficial fallers and other fallers.Results:Fleiss' Kappa for Judgement was 0.838, and Cohen's Kappa was 1.000. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for the Judgement checklist was high. The rate of recurrent falls in beneficial fallers was significantly lower than that in other fallers. The motor FIM in beneficial fallers was significantly higher than that in other fallers, and beneficial fallers tended to have above average ability to recover.Conclusion:The reliability and predictive validity of the Judgement checklist were shown to be high. The Judgment checklist was effective in evaluating the quality of falls and was useful for patient instruction after a fall.

3.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-688360

ABSTRACT

Objective:The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and predictive validity of the Judgement checklist for beneficial falls (hereafter called“Judgement checklist”) in stroke patients.Methods:Five raters evaluated the Judgement checklist for 20 fallers with stroke, and two raters reevaluated the same patients. Fleiss' Kappa and Cohen's Kappa for examination of inter-rater and intra-rater reliability were calculated. For predictive validity, beneficial fallers were identified from among 123 fallers with stroke, using the Judgement checklist. We compared the incidence rate of recurrent falls and motor Functional Independence Measure (FIM) in beneficial fallers and other fallers.Results:Fleiss' Kappa for Judgement was 0.838, and Cohen's Kappa was 1.000. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for the Judgement checklist was high. The rate of recurrent falls in beneficial fallers was significantly lower than that in other fallers. The motor FIM in beneficial fallers was significantly higher than that in other fallers, and beneficial fallers tended to have above average ability to recover.Conclusion:The reliability and predictive validity of the Judgement checklist were shown to be high. The Judgment checklist was effective in evaluating the quality of falls and was useful for patient instruction after a fall.

4.
Palliative Care Research ; : 906-909, 2016.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-378219

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Approximately 30% of the patients who received intervention from a palliative care team for problematic symptoms (e.g., pain, nausea, depression) also underwent rehabilitation at our acute hospital. We investigated their changes in activities of daily living (ADLs) and outcomes (i.e., death, changing hospitals, or being discharged to their homes). Method: We retrospectively analyzed the patients’ medical records data to examine patient training content, Barthel Index (B.I.) scores, and outcomes. Results: For one year, 86 patients received rehabilitation and 42 (48%) underwent anticancer therapy. B.I. scores increased for 35% of the patients, were stable for 20%, and decreased for 45%; 95% of the patients with decreased B.I. scores could not be discharged home. Conclusion: Advanced cancer patients are likely to experience a decline in ADLs and require longer rehabilitation periods to improve. A team approach is important for preventing disuse syndromes within a palliative care setting.

5.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-377204

ABSTRACT

Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is the term used to describe the symptoms that may develop many years after acute paralytic poliomyelitis( APP). In the case of PPS, the symptoms and signs include progressive muscle wasting and weakness, limb pain, and/or fatigue, occurring one or more decades after maximal recovery from APP. An overuse of enlarged motor units is suspected to cause the deterioration of some nerve terminals or the loss of the motor units themselves. This could in turn induce PPS symptoms such as new muscle weakness and atrophy. Electromyography (EMG) is often a strong tool to diagnose and evaluate PPS. Some studies have shown that mild to moderate intensity muscular strengthening has a positive effect in patients affected by PPS. Rehabilitation for PPS patients should utilize a multiprofessional and multidisciplinary approach. PPS patients should be advised to avoid both inactivity and overuse of the affected muscles. Finally, patient evaluation is often required to access the need of orthoses and assistive devices.

6.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362272

ABSTRACT

Objective : To evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) in Japanese patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, single dose, placebo-controlled study (double-blind phase) followed by an open-label, multiple dose extension (open-label phase). Methods : One hundred and nine patients with upper limb spasticity were randomized to receive a single treatment with either a lower dose (120-150 Units ; U), higher dose (200-240U) BTXA or placebo into upper limb muscles in the double-blind phase. These treatments were administered to improve wrist and finger flexion for all patients and thumb flexion in patients with thumb spasticity. Patients who met the re-injection criteria received up to 3 repeated treatments of BTXA (200-240U) into their upper limb muscles with at least 12 weeks between treatments in the open-label phase through 48 weeks. Results : In the double-blind phase there was significant improvement from baseline spasticity on the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) wrist score between the higher dose BTXA and placebo groups, with a mean difference in the area under the curve (AUC) of -6.830 (<i>p</i><0.001, t test). The MAS wrist score further decreased from baseline in all repeat treatment cycles of BTXA in the open-label phase. No clinically relevant difference was noted in the frequency of treatment-related adverse events between BTXA-treated and placebo-treated patients during the study period. Conclusions : BTXA injections reduced spasticity in the upper limb muscles from the first treatment with continued long-term efficacy. Our results suggest that BTXA injections are safe and effective for the long-term treatment of post-stroke upper limb spasticity.

7.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362270

ABSTRACT

Objective : To evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) in Japanese patients with post-stroke lower limb spasticity in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, single dose, placebo-controlled study (double-blind phase) followed by an open-label, multiple dose extension (open-label phase). Methods : One hundred and twenty patients with lower limb spasticity were randomized to receive a single treatment with BTXA 300 Units (U) or placebo into lower limb muscles in the double-blind phase. Patients who met the re-injection criteria received up to 3 repeated treatments of BTXA into lower limb muscles with at least 12 weeks between treatments in the open-label phase through 48 weeks. Results : In the double-blind phase there was significant improvement from baseline spasticity in the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) ankle score between the BTXA 300U and placebo groups, with a mean difference in the area under the curve (AUC) of -3.428 (<i>p</i>=0.006, t test). The MAS ankle score further decreased from baseline in all repeat treatment cycles of BTXA in the open-label phase. No clinically relevant difference was noted in the frequency of treatment-related adverse events between BTXA-treated and placebo-treated patients during the study period. Conclusions : BTXA reduced spasticity in lower limb muscles from the first treatment with continued long-term efficacy. BTXA is safe and effective for the long-term treatment of post-stroke lower limb spasticity.

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