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1.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-822104

ABSTRACT

Introduction:Respiratory failures are categorized into types I and II. To our knowledge, we report the first case of pulmonary rehabilitation in a patient with systemic sclerosis/polymyositis overlap syndrome who developed type II respiratory failure.Methods:The patient was a 77-year-old woman who had received treatment for systemic sclerosis and polymyositis at another hospital. When she visited our hospital to obtain a second opinion, she suddenly lost consciousness and underwent trachea intubation because of typeⅡrespiratory failure. She received physical therapy on the third day of hospitalization and underwent a tracheotomy on the 16th day. As her thoracic movement was markedly restricted, we started physical training. After she was weaned off from the ventilator on the 43rd day, we performed muscular strength training and aerobic exercise. No exacerbation of CO2 storage was observed even if chest motion training was performed. She was discharged on the 72nd day and advised to wear retina®.Administration of therapeutic drugs such as steroids was maintained at the same dose.Conclusion:Physical therapy, such as chest mobilization, was effective for marked restriction of chest movement in a patient who had both polymyositis and systemic sclerosis.

2.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-826251

ABSTRACT

Introduction:Respiratory failures are categorized into types I and II. To our knowledge, we report the first case of pulmonary rehabilitation in a patient with systemic sclerosis/polymyositis overlap syndrome who developed type II respiratory failure.Methods:The patient was a 77-year-old woman who had received treatment for systemic sclerosis and polymyositis at another hospital. When she visited our hospital to obtain a second opinion, she suddenly lost consciousness and underwent trachea intubation because of typeⅡrespiratory failure. She received physical therapy on the third day of hospitalization and underwent a tracheotomy on the 16th day. As her thoracic movement was markedly restricted, we started physical training. After she was weaned off from the ventilator on the 43rd day, we performed muscular strength training and aerobic exercise. No exacerbation of CO2 storage was observed even if chest motion training was performed. She was discharged on the 72nd day and advised to wear retina®.Administration of therapeutic drugs such as steroids was maintained at the same dose.Conclusion:Physical therapy, such as chest mobilization, was effective for marked restriction of chest movement in a patient who had both polymyositis and systemic sclerosis.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-90616

ABSTRACT

The aims of this study were to evaluate the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) driven by 6 different promoters, including cytomegalovirus IE enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter (CAG), cytomegalovirus promoter (CMV), neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSE), myosin 7A promoter (Myo), elongation factor 1alpha promoter (EF-1alpha), and Rous sarcoma virus promoter (RSV), and assess the dose response of CAG promoter to transgene expression in the cochlea. Serotype 1 adeno-associated virus (AAV1) vectors with various constructs were transduced into the cochleae, and the level of EGFP expression was examined. We found the highest EGFP expression in the inner hair cells and other cochlear cells when CAG promoter was used. The CMV and NSE promoter drove the higher EGFP expression, but only a marginal activity was observed in EF-1alpha promoter driven constructs. RSV promoter failed to driven the EGFP expression. Myo promoter driven EGFP was exclusively expressed in the inner hair cells of the cochlea. When driven by CAG promoter, reporter gene expression was detected in inner hair cells at a dose as low as 3 x 10(7) genome copies, and continued to increase in a dose- dependent manner. Our data showed that individual promoter has different ability to drive reporter gene expression in the cochlear cells. Our results might provide important information with regard to the role of promoters in regulating transgene expression and for the proper design of vectors for gene expression and gene therapy.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cochlea/cytology , Dependovirus/genetics , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics , Transgenes
4.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362359

ABSTRACT

To investigate the relationship between adolescent sport activity and abnormalities of the lumbar spine on radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 237 collegiate athletes (mean age 19.4), representing judo, wrestling, and track, were analyzed from the point of contact or noncontact sports. Radiologic and/or MRI abnormalities of the lumbar spine were found in 68.7% of contact sports athletes (judo and wrestling, n=147), 53.3% of noncontact sports athletes (track, n=90), 69.9% of athletes who have played contact sports over 9 years (C9 athletes, n=83), and 47.1% of atheletes who have done noncontact sports over 9 years (N9 athletes, n=17). Discopathy related abnormalities on radiologic examination were found in 25.3% and 11.8% of C9 and N9 athletes. Disc degeneration on MRI was found in 45.8% and 29.4% of C9 and N9 athletes. Spondylolysis was found in 31.3% of C9, 5.9% of N9, 31.3% of elementary-C (athletes who played contact sports during elementary school, n=96), 32.8% of elementary-L/I (limited contact/impact sports, n=58), and 8.6% of elementary-N athletes (noncontact sports, n=35), respectively. From these results, we concluded that contact sports activity during adolescence induces lumbar spine abnormalities at a higher rate compared to noncontact sports and that spondylolysis is related to contact or limited contact/impact sport activity during elementary school.

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