Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
Add filters








Year range
1.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837414

ABSTRACT

Here, we present a case of successful aortic valve repair of traumatic aortic regurgitation (AR). A man in his early twenties had a chest blunt trauma due to a bicycle accident 6 years earlier and suffered sternum fracture. He recovered without cardiovascular complications. Three months previously, a new diastolic murmur was detected on medical checkup. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed severe AR, and the left ventricular end-diastolic-/end-systolic dimension was 69/51 mm. Transesophageal echocardiography showed severe AR with perforation of the non-coronary cusp and dilatation of the aortic annulus (29.6 mm). Aortic valve repair was performed with an autologous pericardial patch and external suture annuloplasty. Postoperative TTE showed normal aortic valve function with trivial AR. He was discharged on postoperative day 11. Three months later, TTE showed trivial AR along with a reduced left ventricular dimension and improved left ventricular ejection fraction.

2.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-825975

ABSTRACT

We report a successful conversion of anti-coagulant therapy from warfarin to heparin for a case of mechanical heart valve and warfarin-induced skin ulcer. A 57-year-old female who was diagnosed with Ebstein disease and underwent mechanical valve replacement suffered from a recurring and resistant leg skin ulcer. Nine years after the induction of warfarin, her right leg skin ulcer occurred suddenly and worsened gradually. No dermatological treatment could cure it and three auto-skin transplantations were performed in the past four years. The definitive cause of the ulcer could not be diagnosed by any laboratory study or image inspection. Further, after every transplant surgery, the resumption of warfarin had made her ulcer recur and worsen. Therefore, we finally came to think of this disease as the warfarin-induced skin ulcer. To avoid warfarin, subcutaneous self-injection therapy of Heparin-Ca was applied as her anti-coagulation after the 4th transplant surgery. The patient was discharged from hospital on post-operative day 78 with a good condition of the transplanted skin graft and right leg. An adequate level of APTT could be maintained with injections of 10,000 units of Heparin-Ca twice a day and data on D Dimer and cardiac echography show no thromboembolism at the out-patient visits. The result of auto-skin transplantation is also a good course under this therapy. As we have very few reports concerning heparin self-injection therapy for artificial valves, it is very important that careful observation should be continued.

3.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-758157

ABSTRACT

A diagnosis of active aortic valve endocarditis was made in a 52-year-old man who presented with fever and edema. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus. The infection was treated successfully using antibiotics and dental care, but a mobile vegetation-like structure on the aortic valve and severe aortic regurgitation, mainly due to aortic annulus dilatation, remained and required surgery. During the surgical procedure, the aortic valve leaflets were seen to be almost normal, and the regurgitation was found to be mainly due to aortic annulus dilation. Regurgitation could be managed with external suture annuloplasty alone, although a second session was necessary to reduce the annular size by one size. The annular size has been stable for over 1 year after surgery without re-operation of the aortic valve. This procedure not only reduces the operation time but also decreases the surgical stress and avoids the need for prosthetic valve replacement.

4.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-738364

ABSTRACT

Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ARCAPA) is a rare congenital coronary anomaly. Although asymptomatic in most cases, with the anomaly only being detected incidentally, surgical correction should be considered before onset of severe myocardial ischemia in such cases. Here, we present a 70-year-old man who was referred to our department due to chest pain on effort and was given a diagnosis of ARCAPA concomitant with mild aortic stenosis. As the symptoms and the degree of aortic stenosis deteriorated during follow-up, the patient underwent direct re-implantation of the right coronary artery into the ascending aorta and aortic valve replacement. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and the symptoms disappeared. Postoperative myocardial perfusion scintigraphy revealed improvement of the myocardial ischemic area.

5.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-688721

ABSTRACT

Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is a chronic disease characterized by fibrotic mass and/or thickened lesions with elevated serum IgG4 concentrations, and infiltrations of IgG4 positive plasma cells. Since it has recently been reported to occur in the cardiovascular system, therapeutic strategy needs to be established. We report a case of IgG4-related thoracic aortic aneurysm (IgG4-R TAA) which was diagnosed postoperatively though suspected as aortic intramural hematoma preoperatively. A 70-year-old man who has medical histories of retroperitoneal fibrosis twice visited our hospital with chief complaints of cough and a CT scan was performed. Though there had been no episodes related to the onset of aortic dissection such as chest pain, an ascending aortic intramural hematoma of 52 mm in diameter was suspected and we planned to perform hemi-arch replacement. Intraoperative findings suggested that it was a true aneurysm and there was no sign of dissection. Histopathologically, the adventitia was obviously thickened with infiltrations of IgG4 positive plasma cells without infiltrations and dissection findings in the tunica media. In addition, serum IgG4 exceeded the normal value, thus it was diagnosed as IgG4-R TAA on the basis of the comprehensive diagnostic criteria. Great caution should be taken in IgG4-R TAA because it may show intramural hematoma on imaging and may develop aortic dissection and rupture as well.

6.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-367197

ABSTRACT

A 77-year-old man, who had undergone total cystectomy, was transferred to our hospital because of repeated arterial bleeding from the left cutaneous urostomy on urostomy catheter exchange. Abdominal CT scan revealed infrarenal aortic and bilateral common iliac aneurysms. Multidrug-resistant <i>Pseudomonas</i> was detected from preoperative urine culture. A fistula between the left iliac artery and the left ureter was strongly suspected and an operation was performed. Aneurysmectomy and graft replacement with a bifurcated graft was conducted. Both limbs of the Y-graft were anastomosed to the right internal and external iliac artery. The left lower extremity was revascularized using femorofemoral bypass. After left nephrostomy, the graft was wrapped around with an omental flap. The postoperative course was uneventful, without infective complications.

7.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-367124

ABSTRACT

We reported a successful emergency operation for ruptured juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm via an extended retroperitoneal approach. A 70-year-old man with a history of distal gastrectomy and pancreatoduodenectomy complained of epigastric pain and was transferred to our emergency room in a state of shock. Computed tomograpy demonstrated a ruptured juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and massive intraperitoneal hematoma. We performed emergency graft replacement through an extended retroperitoneal approach in order to control the aorta quickly, safely, and reliably. This approach is a useful option in the emergency treatment of ruptured juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

8.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-367024

ABSTRACT

A 20-year-old woman had intermittent fever frequently since dental therapy one year previously. Two months previously Takayasu's arteritis had been diagnosed and she had been given 30mg/day prednisolone. She then developed subarachnoid hemorrhage, left arm pain/cataplexy, purpura, sight disturbance, and sepsis caused by <i>Serratia</i>. Finally she felt chest pain and a left Subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm was detected out. Therefore she was transferred to our service for emergency surgery. Preoperative angiography demonstrated post-stenosis aneurysm in the right common carotid artery, left common carotid artery aneurysm, and saccular pseudoaneurysm in the left subclavian artery that suggested impending rupture. The operation was performed through a left upper partial sternotomy extended to the left supraclavicular space. The left subclavian artery was ligated proximal to the aneurysm and distal portion was also ligated through a subclavicular approach. The postoperative course was uneventful. No ischemic sign has been seen in her left arm one year after operation and left/right brachial artery pressure index has improved to 0.80. The patient currently takes steroids and remains healthy without signs of expansion of bilateral carotid artery aneurysms.

9.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-367012

ABSTRACT

We report a case with Crawford type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm associated with occlusion/stenosis of the visceral and the iliac arteries necessitating surgical repair. The patient was a 54-year-old man. His visceral arteries were obstructed except the left renal artery which was stenotic. His iliac arterial system was also completely occluded except the patent left common and internal iliac arteries. The blood flow of his visceral organs and lower extremities depended on the collateral vessels from the left internal iliac artery. We successfully performed thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair concomitant with reconstruction of the visceral arteries and the femoral arteries using partial cardiopulmonary bypass between the left internal iliac artery and the left femoral vein. It is important to select appropriate adjuncts and surgical options for patients with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms that involve visceral/iliac arteries.

10.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-366965

ABSTRACT

Higher incidence of spinal cord injury has been reported in total aortic arch replacement using a stented elephant trunk compared with the conventional one, perhaps due to embolism of atheromatous plaque to the spinal cord arteries. We report a case with delayed-onset lower spinal cord injury after replacement of the aortic arch and the descending thoracic aorta using a stented elephant trunk. A 69-year-old man who had a history of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using a Y-graft and untreated Crawford's type II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm underwent replacement of the aortic arch and the descending thoracic aorta using a stented elephant trunk. He developed weakness of the lower extremities 4 days after the operation. Since a preoperative computed tomography demonstrated thrombus and atheroma in the aneurysm, atheromatous plaque that can cause embolization of the spinal cord arteries was suspected to be responsible for spinal cord injury. As this technique is mostly applied to patients with severe atheromatous aortic disease, embolization of the intercostal arteries or other main branches caused by manipulation of a stent graft must be avoided.

11.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-366277

ABSTRACT

We experienced a surgically treated case of chronic contained rupture of a common iliac artery aneurysm. A large number of cases of chronic contained ruptures of the abdominal aorta have been reported; however, that of the common iliac artery is very rare. A 66-year-old man was injured in a bicycle accident. Three months later, the patient felt a dull abdominal pain and noticed a tumor in the left lower abdomen. On presenting computed tomography (CT) scan revealed an aneurysm of the left common iliac artery. After further examinations, a contained rupture of the left common iliac artery aneurysm was diagnosed. At operation, the main aneurysm, 7.5×6.5cm in size, was seen in the left common iliac artery, extending to the right common iliac artery and the infrarenal abdominal aorta. A 5.0×3.0cm tear, was found oil the posterior wall of the left common iliac aneurysm, surrounded by a huge hematoma. The aneurysm was resected and the abdominal aorta and the common iliac arteries were replaced with a Bard Albumin-coated DeBakey vascular bifurcated graft (16×8mm). The postoperative course was uneventful.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL