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1.
Medical Education ; : 423-426, 2020.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874043

ABSTRACT

The author emphasizes the importance of liberal arts education in the medical school curriculum to prepare for the coming AI era when the medical practice undergoes drastic changes. The implementation of AI results in the gift of time and the gift of labor in medicine, which we can use to create time for liberal art education. New graduate doctors should be skillful in their current medical practice and flexible to coming changes. They should also contribute to public opinion about medicine.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-629370

ABSTRACT

Background: Development in internet technology enables e-learning at the higher education level. We have developed the Internet PBL-Tutorial System/Rakuichi that allows multi-directional communication among participants with web-based bulletin boards. Although this system has been successful in medical education at the undergraduate level, we sought to encourage “readonly members” to participate more fully in the program. Methods: To this end, we compared the posting frequency among three strategies: (1) students and tutors had an off-site meeting to promote face-to-face communication during the course, (2) several classes were allowed to watch the discussion in other classes in the second half of the course, (3) three classes (5 – 6 students each) in one topic were combined into one class (16 students) in the second half. Results: No meaningful effects were observed for strategies (1) or (2). However, the posting frequency increased 50 % for strategy (3). Conclusion: Facilitation of communication among participants was achieved by increasing the number of student participants. We predicted that an optimal number of students in each class in internet-based PBL would be ~20 people.

3.
Medical Education ; : 33-36, 2012.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-375274

ABSTRACT

1.The basic training curriculum for simulated and standardized patients (SPs) was provided by the 16th Medical Simulation Committee based upon a nationwide field survey that was conducted by the committee in 2009 and other data.<br>2.The curriculum consists of 3 essential programs: interpersonal communication, medical education involving SPs, and the medical interview.<br>3.The medical interview program was composed of basic issues, comprehension of scenarios, acting role and performance, and feedback and assessment.<br>4.The training facilities or institutions were recommended to properly assess the performance quality of SPs in the educational setting by means of a specific and clearly defined evaluation method.

4.
Medical Education ; : 29-35, 2011.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-374431

ABSTRACT

A survey was conducted to better understand the current status of training of simulated and standardized patients (SP) in medical education and training protocol of SP training at each site, and to determine the future planning of the committee<br>1) Methods: A series of questions regarding the SP and SP training was sent to all 80 medical schools in Japan.<br>2) Results: Responses were received from 68 medical school (85%). According to the survey result, 43 medical schools (63%) trained their own SP. The total numbers of SP reported in this survey were 1,036 with ratio of male to female 1:3. The average numbers of SP at each medical school were 24 (range 5 to 87). SP training protocols were included basic training (88%) and to prepare common achievement test OSCE (84%), classes (74%) and advanced OSCE(60%). Only 6 medical school (14%) had the systematic curriculum for SP training.<br>3) Conclusion: To produce standardized, accurate SP training for medical education, the committee recommends to establish the standard curriculum and portrayal requirements for SP training.

5.
Medical Education ; : 433-437, 2009.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362712

ABSTRACT

1) We conducted a workshop to discuss the definition of the term "physician scientist", what thought processes and competencies are expected, and how to better help physician scientists develop through medical schools.2) The definition of a physician-scientist is a physician who both provides patient care and approaches unsolved questions in understanding the mechanisms of diseases and developing new treatments.3) Essential conditions for a medical school to cultivate physician scientists include providing good role models for physician scientists, making efforts to stimulate students' motivation, and supporting collaboration among physicians and scientists on the faculty.

6.
Medical Education ; : 367-374, 2009.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362707

ABSTRACT

The Medical Education Development Center has organized seminars and workshops for medical education 30 times from 2000 through 2008 throughout Japan. The participants have numbered more than 3200 and have included educators, physicians, students, and simulated patients. The topics of seminars and workshops have included problem-based learning tutorial systems, medical interview skills, objective structured clinical examinations, evidence-based medicine, coaching technology, simulations, and community medicine in response to educational needs. A questionnaire survey of 1793 participants of the 11th to 30th seminars and workshops (response rate, 85.6%) showed a high degree of satisfaction (4.33±0.13 of 5 points). Invited lecturers and directors from throughout the country often organized these workshops. The results of workshops are reported in our annual monograph, "Trends in Medical Education."

7.
Medical Education ; : 355-359, 2009.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362705

ABSTRACT

1) We have developed two forms to evaluate students' oral presentation skills (important but hard to teach in the medical school curriculum): one is a peer review form for an audience to evaluate a presenter's performance, and the other is a form for a presenter to evaluate his or her own performance.2) The evaluation process is simple: evaluators fill out the forms by checking the items for evaluation. With these evaluation forms students can get tips for improving their presentations because technical suggestions are written near each item.3) The forms were beneficial for both students and instructors, because students could get tips for improving their presentations, and instructors could concentrate their efforts on scientific content after the students' presentations.

8.
Medical Education ; : 47-53, 2009.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362663

ABSTRACT

Medical students in Japan often want to do clinical rotations abroad. Preparation for these important clinical experiences is essential to maximize the learning opportunities. Language ability is only one small part of assuring success.1) It is important to consider the hospital where the rotation will take place, the specific rotation, the living arrangements and commuting to the hospital. Preparation before the rotation should include practice in performing and writing a complete patient history and physical examination.2) It is very helpful to have a cell phone while abroad, as well as a credit card. Students must bring a white coat, and it is recommended that they also bring a Japanese textbook in the field they will study.3) While on a clinical rotation, students must be active participants in patient care and in discussions. They must be aggressive about answering questions during ward rounds. Students must be aware of many cultural differences to have good relationships with patients and colleagues.

9.
Medical Education ; : 329-334, 2005.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-369949

ABSTRACT

Medical recording is an important learning issue for the clerkship curriculum. Privacy laws require that medical students' access to patient information be managed by faculty members. The Workshop of Medical Education was convened at the Medical Education Development Center, Gifu University, in October 2004 to discuss the management of electronic medical recording systems for clinical clerkships. The purpose of this article is to propose management guidelines and rules for electronic medical recording systems for clinical clerkships in Japan.

10.
Medical Education ; : 89-96, 2005.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-369919

ABSTRACT

We have organized the Seminar and Workshop for Medical Education (SWME) 10 times from 2000 through 2003. More than 1, 200 persons have participated, including teachers, physicians, students, and simulated patients. The themes of the SWME have included a problem-based learning tutorial system, medical interview skills, objective structured clinical examinations, medical ethics, advanced cardiac life support/basic life support, evidence-based medicine, coaching technology, medical English education, and crisis management education. Invited lecturers from throughout the country organized most of these workshops. Advantages of the SWME are two-fold:(1) improving the medical teaching skills of each participant and (2) scouting for good young lecturers. Workshop reports are published in our annual monographs and other materials. The present paper is a historical review of the SWME and also describes the nationwide scope of faculty development.

11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-373914

ABSTRACT

Three new genes of <I>Cryptosporidium parvum</I> were cloned, including a gene encoding methionine aminopeptidase, one encoding chaperonin containing T-complex protein 1 delta (TCP-1 delta) and one with unknown function. DNA sequence analysis indicated that these genes are quite conserved, but there were some base pair differences between genotype I and genotype II isolates. These differences were confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the 3 genes from 41 isolates collected from different hosts and geographical origins. In brief, the band patterns generated by endonuclease Hind III or Hinf I restrictions of the gene of methionine aminopeptidase, Sac I restriction of the gene of chaperonin, or Ava II restriction of the unknown gene could differentiate the isolates of <I>C. parvum</I> into genotype I and genotype II. PCR primers based on these genes amplified only <I>C. parvum</I> genes. Even a single oocyst was detectable with these PCR primers. Thus the results provided further evidence that genotype I and genotype II are distinct, and our three new primers can be used to detect and characterize <I>C. parvum</I> isolates with high sensitivity.

12.
Medical Education ; : 375-379, 2003.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-369857

ABSTRACT

The Common Achievement Tests Organization performed the first nationwide trial of computer-based testing (CBT) used to assess students entering the clinical phase of medical education. Seventy-seven medical schools participated in the trial. We compared performance on the national CBT with performance on preclinical tests administered at Gifu University School of Medicine. Despite some methodologic differences between the national CBT and our system, the overall results correlated well. Students who did poorly on the national CBT also did poorly on Gifu University's preclinical test. Correlation of these two performance scales suggests that nationwide CBT could be used to accurately assess preclinical skills.

13.
Medical Education ; : 13-19, 2003.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-369816

ABSTRACT

To assess the effectiveness of a problem-based learning tutorial system introduced at Gifu University School of Medicine in 1995, we conducted a questionnaire survey of medical knowledge, attitudes about learning, communication ability, and social behavior in sixth-year medical students. The questionnaire was given to instructors and attending physicians at community hospitals who were involved in clinical education. Many of the evaluators felt that students who trained with the tutorial system showed improved understanding, a more active attitude toward learning, and a better attitude toward patients than did students who received traditional, lecture-based education.

14.
Medical Education ; : 253-260, 2002.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-369806

ABSTRACT

We propose a new video system with four cameras aimed in different directions for use in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) to 1) minimize the examiner's burden and 2) standardize the examiner's evaluation. The system consists of four charge-coupled device video cameras, several microphones, and a video tape recorder. The OSCE of each student was recorded with four cameras simultaneously aimed in different directions so that the student's performance could be viewed and evaluated at the examiner's convenience. Two trials for this system were undertaken at different times. More than 80% of those participating in the trials thought that this system was useful for examining the basic skills of medical students as part of the OSCE, and more than 70% thought that the system would increase educational efficacy. This system may improve the reliability and efficiency of OSCE.

15.
Medical Education ; : 239-246, 2000.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-369737

ABSTRACT

Gifu University School of Medicine has introduced a new learning method for medical science, named tutorial system. To assess the efficacy of the method, we conducted a questionnaire survey of students' medical knowledge, attitudes to learning, communication ability, and social behavior. The questionnaire was given to instructors/attending physicians involved in clinical education. Results of the evaluation were compared to those of previous medical students. Our results suggest that the tutorial system in our medical school result in an improvement over the previous curricula.

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