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1.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 47(12): 1036-1043, 12/2014. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-727657

ABSTRACT

Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction.


Subject(s)
Animals , Cattle , Humans , Apoptosis/drug effects , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Glycation End Products, Advanced/pharmacology , Periodontal Ligament/cytology , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , Serum Albumin, Bovine/pharmacology , Cell Count , /metabolism , Cell Survival/drug effects , Diabetes Complications , Flow Cytometry , Fibroblasts/metabolism , Immunohistochemistry , In Situ Nick-End Labeling , Primary Cell Culture , Periodontal Diseases/complications , Periodontal Ligament/drug effects , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
2.
Medicina (B.Aires) ; 65(2): 103-107, 2005. tab, graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: lil-426089

ABSTRACT

Un paradigma clásico de la inmulogía plantea que para que ocurra cambio de isotipo en los anticuerpos es condición sine qua non la presentación del antígeno a un linfócito T colaborador por parte de una célula presentadora de antígenos. En el presente trabajo se diseñó un modelo animal, ratones BALB/c, de respuesta inmune frente a dos antígenos típicos. Se utilizo dextrán como antígeno T independiente (AgTI) y seroalbúmina bovina (SAB) como antígeno T dependiente (AgTD), y se estúdio la respuesta, analizando los isotipos de los anticuerpos específicos producidos. Los resultados obtenidos muestran que la respuesta a dextrán en presencia de SAB ocurre con cambio de isotipo (swith), essencialmente de IgM a IgG. Estos experimentos sugieren que la SAB genera un entorno bioquímico inductor de cambio de isotipo tanto en supropia via de procesamiento como en del dextrán. Los resultados señalan que la asociación exclusiva de los AgTDs con las respuestas em las que ocurre cambio de isotipo es incorrecta. Considerando el modelo propuesto resulta poco probable encontrar in vivo y en forma espontânea casos en los que los AgTIs ingreses al organismo aislados; en cambio, es mucho más probable que el ingreso ocurra conjuntamente con AgTDs, y en consecuencia ocurra cambio de isotipo.


Subject(s)
Cattle , Mice , Animals , Male , Female , Antigens, T-Independent/immunology , Dextrans/immunology , Immunoglobulin Class Switching/immunology , Serum Albumin, Bovine/immunology , Dextrans/pharmacology , Immunoglobulin Class Switching/drug effects , Immunoglobulin G/drug effects , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/drug effects , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Models, Animal , Serum Albumin, Bovine/pharmacology
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-19480

ABSTRACT

In order to observe the effects of serum albumin and fibrinogen on biophysical surface properties and the morphology of pulmonary surfactant in vitro, we measured the surface adsorption rate, dynamic minimum and maximum surface tension (min-, max-ST) by Pulsating Bubble Surfactometer, and demonstrated ultrastructures on a series of mixtures with varying concentrations of albumin or fibrinogen and Surfactant-TA. The albumin and fibrinogen significantly inhibited the adsorption rate and ST-lowering properties of surfactant through increasing STs of adsorption rate, min-ST, and max-ST. The characteristic morphology of the Surfactant-TA changed from lamellar rod-like structure with open ends into spherical structures with loss of their open ends by mixing with albumin or fibrinogen. These inhibitory effects of albumin and fibrinogen on surface properties of surfactant were dependent upon the increasing concentration of albumin or fibrinogen. We concluded that albumin and fibrinogen significantly altered surfactant function and its ultrastructural morphology in vitro. These findings support the concept that albumin and fibrinogen-induced surfactant dysfunction may play an important role in the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome, and this adverse effect of albumin and fibrinogen on surfactant might be overcome by administration of large doses of exogenous surfactant.


Subject(s)
Adsorption , Animals , Cattle , Fibrinogen/pharmacology , Humans , Pulmonary Surfactants/ultrastructure , Pulmonary Surfactants/drug effects , Serum Albumin, Bovine/pharmacology , Surface Properties
4.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 30(5): 675-8, May 1997. ilus, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-196682

ABSTRACT

Human skinned muscle fibers were used to investigate the effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the tension/pCa relationship and on the functional properties of the Ca2+- release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In both fast-and slow-type fibers, identified by their tension response to pSr 5.0, BSA (0.7-15 muM) had no effect on the Ca2+ affinity of the contractile proteins and elicited no tension per se in Ca2+-loaded fibers. In contrast, BSA (>1.0 muM) potentiated the caffeine induced tension in Ca2+-loaded fibers, this effect being more intense in slow-type fibers. Thus, BSA reduced the threshold caffeine concentration required for eliciting detectable tension, and increased the amplitude, the rate of rise and the area under the curve of caffeine-induced tension BSA also potentiated the tension elicited in Ca2+-loaded fibers by low-Mg2+ solutions containing 1.0 mM free ATP. These results suggest that BSA modulates the response of the human skeletal muscle SR Ca2+-release channel to activators such as caffeine and ATP.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adenosine Triphosphate/pharmacology , Caffeine/pharmacology , Calcium Channel Blockers/pharmacology , Calcium Channels/drug effects , Central Nervous System Stimulants/pharmacology , In Vitro Techniques , Muscle Fibers, Skeletal/drug effects , Muscle Tonus/drug effects , Muscle, Skeletal/drug effects , Neurotransmitter Agents/pharmacology , Serum Albumin, Bovine/pharmacology
5.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 11-16, 1974.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-54370

ABSTRACT

Rabbit follicular oocytes were cultured in a medium supplemented with various elements such as bovine serum(RS), bovine serum albumin(BSA), amino acids and chorionic gonadotrophic hormone(HCG) in order to find which factors among them were most effective for oocyte maturation. The presence of BSA in the basic medium (modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate) did not elevate the proportion of oocyte maturation. When BS alone was added to the medium, only a few oocytes could reach to metaphase I and most of them were in degeneration. This implies that BS may act as an inhibitory or a toxic agent to the rabbit oocytes. It was found that the medium supplemented with 0.4% BSA and amino acids together raised the proportion of the oocyte maturation (54-62%). Especially the presence of proline, or of both proline and glutamine, gave a more favourable condition for the initiation of meiotic division than other amino acids. Addition of HCG to the medium did not promote the proportion of the oocyte maturation. As a consequence, it is apparent that amino acids in the medium are the most essential factors in inducing oocyte meiotic division.


Subject(s)
Amino Acids/pharmacology , Animals , Chorionic Gonadotropin/pharmacology , Culture Media , Female , Growth , Oocytes/physiology , Ovum/physiology , Rabbits , Serum Albumin, Bovine/pharmacology
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