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1.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 2229-2242, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1007608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in the world. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase 25 (USP25) protein has been reported to participate in the development of several cancers. However, few studies have reported its association with HCC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the function and mechanism of USP25 in the progression of HCC.@*METHODS@#We analyzed USP25 protein expression in HCC based on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) database cohorts. Then, we constructed USP25-overexpressing and USP25-knockdown HepG2, MHCC97H, and L-O2 cells. We detected the biological function of USP25 by performing a series of assays, such as Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), colony formation, transwell, and wound healing assays. Western blotting and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses were performed to detect the interaction between USP25 and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. The relationship between USP25 and tripartite motif-containing 21 (TRIM21) was assessed through mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analysis. Finally, we constructed a mouse liver cancer model with the USP25 gene deletion to verify in vivo role of USP25.@*RESULTS@#USP25 was highly expressed in HCC tissue and HCC cell lines. Importantly, high expression of USP25 in tissues was closely related to a poor prognosis. USP25 knockdown markedly reduced the proliferation, migration, and invasion of HepG2 and MHCC97H cells, whereas USP25 overexpression led to the opposite effects. In addition, we demonstrated that USP25 interacts with TRIM21 to regulate the expression of proteins related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT; E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and Snail) and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway (β-catenin, Adenomatous polyposis coli, Axin2 and Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta) and those of their downstream proteins (C-myc and Cyclin D1). Finally, we verified that knocking out USP25 inhibited tumor growth and distant metastasis in vivo .@*CONCLUSIONS@#In summary, our data showed that USP25 was overexpressed in HCC. USP25 promoted the proliferation, migration, invasion, and EMT of HCC cells by interacting with TRIM21 to activate the β-catenin signaling pathway.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , beta Catenin/genetics , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/pathology , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Movement/genetics , Cell Proliferation/genetics , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Liver Neoplasms/pathology , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/metabolism , Wnt Signaling Pathway/genetics
2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-986980

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To screen for small molecular compounds with selective inhibitory activity against cutaneous melanoma cells with BAP1 deletion.@*METHODS@#Cutaneous melanoma cells expressing wild-type BAP1 were selected to construct a BAP1 knockout cell model using CRISPR-Cas9 system, and small molecules with selective inhibitory activity against BAP1 knockout cells were screened from a compound library using MTT assay. Rescue experiment was carried out to determine whether the sensitivity of BAP1 knockout cells to the candidate compounds was directly related to BAP1 deletion. The effects of the candidate compounds on cell cycle and apoptosis were detected with flow cytometry, and the protein expressions in the cells were analyzed with Western blotting.@*RESULTS@#The p53 activator RITA from the compound library was shown to selectively inhibit the viability of BAP1 knockout cells. Overexpression of wild-type BAP1 reversed the sensitivity of BAP1 knockout cells to RITA, while overexpression of the mutant BAP1 (C91S) with inactivated ubiquitinase did not produce any rescue effect. Compared with the control cells expressing wild-type BAP1, BAP1 knockout cells were more sensitive to RITA-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (P < 0.0001) and showed an increased expression of p53 protein, which was further increased by RITA treatment (P < 0.0001).@*CONCLUSION@#Loss of BAP1 results in the sensitivity of cutaneous melanoma cells to p53 activator RITA. In melanoma cells, the activity of ubiquitinase in BAP1 is directly related to their sensitivity to RITA. An increased expression of p53 protein induced by BAP1 knockout is probably a key reason for RITA sensitivity of melanoma cells, suggesting the potential of RITA as a targeted therapeutic agent for cutaneous melanoma carrying BAP1-inactivating mutations.


Subject(s)
Humans , Melanoma , Skin Neoplasms , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 , Apoptosis , Cell Division , Tumor Suppressor Proteins/genetics , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/genetics
3.
Chinese Journal of Pathology ; (12): 364-369, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-985681

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the clinicopathological features, immunophenotypes and molecular genetics of fibroma of tendon sheath (FTS). Methods: One hundred and thirty-four cases of FTS or tenosynovial fibroma diagnosed in the Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China from January 2008 to April 2019 were selected. The clinical and histologic features of these cases were retrospectively reviewed. Immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed on the above cases. Results: There were a total of 134 cases of FTS, including 67 males and 67 females. The patients' median age was 38 years (ranged from 2 to 85 years). The median tumor size was 1.8 cm (ranged from 0.1 to 6.8 cm). The most common site was the upper extremity (76/134, 57%). Follow-up data was available in 28 cases and there was no detectable recurrence. Classic FTS (114 cases) were well-defined and hypocellular. A few spindle-shaped fibroblasts were scattered in the dense collagenous sclerotic stroma. Characteristically elongated slit-like spaces or thin-walled vessels were observed. Most of cellular FTSs (20 cases) were well-defined and the area with increased cellularity of the spindle cells coexisted with classic FTS. There were occasional mitotic figures, but no atypical mitotic figures. Immunohistochemistry was performed in 8 cases of classic FTS and most cases were positive for SMA (5/8). Immunohistochemistry was also performed in 13 cases of cellular FTS and showed 100% positive rate for SMA. FISH was conducted on 20 cases of cellular FTS and 32 cases of classical FTS. USP6 gene rearrangement was found in 11/20 of cellular FTS. Among 12 cases of CFTS with nodular fasciitis (NF)-like morphological feature, 7 cases showed USP6 gene rearrangement. The rearrangement proportion of USP6 gene in cellular FTS without NF-like morphological features was 4/8. By contrast, 3% (1/32) of the classic FTS showed USP6 gene rearrangement. RT-PCR was performed in those cases with detected USP6 gene rearrangement and sufficient tissue samples for RT-PCR. The MYH9-USP6 fusion gene was detected in 1 case (1/8) of the cellular FTSs, while no target fusion partner was detected in the classic FTS. Conclusions: FTS is a relatively rare benign fibroblastic or myofibroblastic tumor. Our study and recent literature find that some of the classic FTS also show USP6 gene rearrangements, suggesting that classical FTS and cellular FTS are likely to be at different stages of the same disease (spectrum). FISH for USP6 gene rearrangement may be used as an important auxiliary diagnostic tool in distinguishing FTS from other tumors.


Subject(s)
Male , Female , Humans , Gene Rearrangement , In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence , Retrospective Studies , Fibroma/pathology , Fasciitis/genetics , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase , Tendons/pathology
4.
Arch. endocrinol. metab. (Online) ; 66(1): 104-111, Jan.-Feb. 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364312

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY We present the unique case of an adult Brazilian woman with severe short stature due to growth hormone deficiency with a heterozygous G to T substitution in the donor splice site of intron 3 of the growth hormone 1 (GH1) gene (c.291+1G>T). In this autosomal dominant form of growth hormone deficiency (type II), exon 3 skipping results in expression of the 17.5 kDa isoform of growth hormone, which has a dominant negative effect over the bioactive isoform, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, disrupts the Golgi apparatus, and impairs the secretion of other pituitary hormones in addition to growth hormone deficiency. This mechanism led to the progression of central hypothyroidism in the same patient. After 5 years of growth and thyroid hormone replacement, at the age of 33, laboratory evaluation for increased weight gain revealed high serum and urine cortisol concentrations, which could not be suppressed with dexamethasone. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sella turcica detected a pituitary macroadenoma, which was surgically removed. Histological examination confirmed an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. A ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8) somatic pathogenic variant (c.2159C>G/p.Pro720Arg) was found in the tumor. In conclusion, we report progression of isolated growth hormone deficiency due to a germline GH1 variant to combined pituitary hormone deficiency followed by hypercortisolism due to an ACTH-secreting macroadenoma with a somatic variant in USP8 in the same patient. Genetic studies allowed etiologic diagnosis and prognosis of this unique case.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Adult , Human Growth Hormone , Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion , Dwarfism, Pituitary/genetics , Endopeptidases/genetics , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/genetics , Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport/genetics , Germ Cells , Mutation
5.
Arq. neuropsiquiatr ; 78(7): 424-429, July 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1131727

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) enzyme levels were investigated in patients with epilepsy, epileptic seizure, remission period, and healthy individuals. Methods: Three main groups were evaluated, including epileptic seizure, patients with epilepsy in the non-seizure period, and healthy volunteers. The patients having a seizure in the Emergency department or brought by a postictal confusion were included in the epileptic attack group. The patients having a seizure attack or presenting to the Neurology outpatient department for follow up were included in the non-seizure (remission period) group. Results: The UCH-L1 enzyme levels of 160 patients with epilepsy (80 patients with epileptic attack and 80 patients with epilepsy in the non-seizure period) and 100 healthy volunteers were compared. Whereas the UCH-L1 enzyme levels were 8.30 (IQR=6.57‒11.40) ng/mL in all patients with epilepsy, they were detected as 3.90 (IQR=3.31‒7.22) ng/mL in healthy volunteers, and significantly increased in numbers for those with epilepsy (p<0.001). However, whereas the UCH-L1 levels were 8.50 (IQR=6.93‒11.16) ng/mL in the patients with epileptic seizures, they were 8.10 (IQR=6.22‒11.93) ng/mL in the non-seizure period, and no significant difference was detected (p=0.6123). When the UCH-L1 cut-off value was taken as 4.34 mg/mL in Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curve analysis, the sensitivity and specificity detected were 93.75 and 66.00%, respectively (AUG=0.801; p<0.0001; 95%CI 0.747‒0.848) for patients with epilepsy. Conclusion: Even though UCH-L1 levels significantly increased more in patients with epilepsy than in healthy individuals, there was no difference between epileptic seizure and non-seizure periods.


RESUMO Objetivo: Níveis da enzima ubiquitina C-terminal hidrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) foram investigados em pacientes com epilepsia, crise epiléptica, período de remissão e indivíduos saudáveis. Método: Foram avaliados três grupos principais, incluindo crise epiléptica, epilepsia no período não convulsivo e voluntários saudáveis. Pacientes com convulsão no departamento de emergência ou trazidos por confusão pós-ictal foram incluídos no grupo de crise epiléptica. Os pacientes que tiveram crise epiléptica ou foram ao ambulatório de Neurologia para acompanhamento foram incluídos no grupo não convulsivo (período de remissão). Resultados: Os níveis da enzima UCH-L1 de 160 pacientes com epilepsia (80 pacientes com crise epiléptica e 80 pacientes com epilepsia no período não convulsivo) e 100 voluntários saudáveis foram comparados. Enquanto os níveis da enzima UCH-L1 foram 8,30 (IQR=6,57‒11,40) ng/mL em todos os pacientes com epilepsia, os níveis detectados foram de 3,90 (IQR=3,31‒7,22) ng/mL em voluntários saudáveis e aumentaram significativamente na epilepsia (p<0,001). No entanto, ao passo que os níveis de UCH-L1 foram 8,50 (IQR=6,93‒11,16) ng/mL nos pacientes com crise epiléptica, foram 8,10 (IQR=6,22‒11,93) ng/mL no período não convulsivo, e nenhuma diferença significativa foi detectada (p=0,6123). Quando o valor de corte de UCH-L1 foi considerado 4,34 mg/mL com base na análise da curva ROC, sensibilidade e especificidade foram detectadas como 93,75 e 66,00%, respectivamente (AUG=0,801; p<0,0001; IC95% 0,747‒0,848) para os pacientes com epilepsia. Conclusão: Embora os níveis de UCH-L1 tenham aumentado significativamente nos pacientes com epilepsia em relação aos indivíduos saudáveis, não foi observada diferença entre crise epiléptica e períodos não convulsivos.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Seizures/etiology , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/blood , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Seizures/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Case-Control Studies , ROC Curve , Sensitivity and Specificity , Epilepsy/blood
6.
Laboratory Animal Research ; : 172-179, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786406

ABSTRACT

Glutamate leads to neuronal cell damage by generating neurotoxicity during brain development. The objective of this study is to identify proteins that differently expressed by glutamate treatment in neonatal cerebral cortex. Sprague-Dawley rat pups (post-natal day 7) were intraperitoneally injected with vehicle or glutamate (10 mg/kg). Brain tissues were isolated 4 h after drug treatment and fixed for morphological study. Moreover, cerebral cortices were collected for protein study. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were carried out to identify specific proteins. We observed severe histopathological changes in glutamate-exposed cerebral cortex. We identified various proteins that differentially expressed by glutamate exposure. Identified proteins were thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin 5, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1, proteasome subunit alpha proteins, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and heat shock protein 60. Heat shock protein 60 was increased in glutamate exposed condition. However, other proteins were decreased in glutamate-treated animals. These proteins are related to anti-oxidant, protein degradation, metabolism, signal transduction, and anti-apoptotic function. Thus, our findings can suggest that glutamate leads to neonatal cerebral cortex damage by regulation of specific proteins that mediated with various functions.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Rats , Brain , Cerebral Cortex , Chaperonin 60 , Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional , Glutamic Acid , Isocitrate Dehydrogenase , Mass Spectrometry , Metabolism , Neurons , Peroxiredoxins , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex , Proteolysis , Proteomics , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Signal Transduction , Thioredoxins , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase
7.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 377-386, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717414

ABSTRACT

Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that is highly expressed in neurons, and gathering evidence indicates that UCH-L1 may play pathogenic roles in many neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD). Additionally, lipid rafts have attracted interest in neurodegeneration as playing a common role in many neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that UCH-L1 associates with lipid rafts as with other PD-associated gene products. In addition, UCH-L1 regulates lipid raft-dependent endocytosis and it is not dependent on the expression and degradation of caveolin-1 or flotillin-1. Finally, UCH-L1 regulates cell-to-cell transmission of α-synuclein. This study provides evidence that many PD-associated gene products share common signaling pathways to explain the pathogenesis of PD.


Subject(s)
alpha-Synuclein , Alzheimer Disease , Caveolin 1 , Endocytosis , Neurodegenerative Diseases , Neurons , Parkinson Disease , Prion Diseases , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase , Ubiquitin
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-645332

ABSTRACT

Head injury is a common presenting complaint amongst emergency department patients. To date, there has been no widespread utilization of neuro-biomarkers to aid the diagnosis of traumatic brain injury. This review article explores which neuro-biomarkers could be used in the emergency department in aiding the clinical diagnosis of mild traumatic brain injury. Based on the available evidence, the most promising neuro-biomarkers appear to be Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase Isozyme L1 (UCH-L1) as these show significant rises in peripheral blood levels shortly after injury and these have been demonstrated to correlate with long-term clinical outcomes. Treatment strategies for minor traumatic brain injury in the emergency department setting are not well developed. The introduction of blood neuro-biomarkers could reduce unnecessary radiation exposure and provide an opportunity to improve the care of this patient group.


Subject(s)
Humans , Biomarkers , Brain Concussion , Brain Injuries , Craniocerebral Trauma , Diagnosis , Emergency Service, Hospital , Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein , Radiation Exposure , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase
9.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 963-968, 2017.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-812849

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To investigate the expression characteristics of the USP24 gene in the mouse testis and its role in spermatogenesis.@*METHODS@#We examined the expression characteristics of USP24 in the testis tissues of wild-type mice at different postnatal weeks (PNW) and androgen receptor (AR)-knockout (ARKO) adult mice using real-time quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence, and detected the transcriptional activity of the USP24 promoter by dual-luciferase reporter gene assay.@*RESULTS@#The expression of the USP24 gene was low in the testis tissue of the wild-type mice at PNW 1, increased dramatically at PNW 3 and stayed at a similar level till PNW 8. The USP24 protein was located mainly in the cytoplasm of Sertoli and spermatogenic cells. Compared with the wild-type, the adult ARKO mice showed a decreased expression of USP24 localized in the posterior head and mid-piece of the mature sperm in the testis. Dual-luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the transcriptional activity of the USP24 promoter was increased after testosterone stimulation.@*CONCLUSIONS@#The increased expression of the USP24 gene was associated with the initiation of sexual development, and the USP24 protein was expressed in the mature sperm of the mice. USP24 is an AR-target gene, which may be involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis in mice.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Receptors, Androgen , Genetics , Sertoli Cells , Spermatogenesis , Genetics , Spermatozoa , Metabolism , Testis , Metabolism , Testosterone , Transcription, Genetic , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase , Genetics , Metabolism
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-311410

ABSTRACT

In the present study, we used a proteomics approach based on a two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) reference map to investigate protein expression in the ovarian tissues of pubertal Swiss-Webster mice subjected to carbon ion radiation (CIR). Among the identified proteins, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is associated with the cell cycle[1] and that it influences proliferation in ovarian tissues. We analyzed the expression of UCH-L1 and the proliferation marker proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) following CIR using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. The proteomics and biochemical results provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of CIR toxicity in ovarian tissues.


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Mice , Biomarkers , Carrier Proteins , Genetics , Metabolism , Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional , Gene Expression , Heavy Ion Radiotherapy , Ovary , Radiation Effects , Proteomics , Random Allocation , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase , Genetics , Metabolism
11.
Psychiatry Investigation ; : 344-349, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-164257

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: α-synuclein, Nogo-A and Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) have neuromodulatory roles for human brain. Therefore, abnormalities of these molecules are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Although some serum studies in the other disorders have been made, serum study of α-synuclein, Nogo-A and UCH-L1 is not present in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Therefore, our aim was to compare serum levels of α-synuclein, Nogo-A and UCH-L1 of the patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. METHODS: Forty-four patients with schizophrenia who is followed by psychotic disorders unit, and 40 healthy control were included in this study. Socio-demographic form and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was applied to patients, and sociodemographic form was applied to control group. Fasting bloods were collected and the serum levels of α-synuclein, Nogo-A and UCH-L1 were measured by ELISA method. RESULTS: Serum α-synuclein [patient: 12.73 (5.18–31.84) ng/mL; control: 41.77 (15.12–66.98) ng/mL], Nogo-A [patient: 33.58 (3.09–77.26) ng/mL; control: 286.05 (136.56–346.82) ng/mL] and UCH-L1 [patient: 5.26 (1.64–10.87) ng/mL; control: 20.48 (11.01–20.81) ng/mL] levels of the patients with schizophrenia were significianly lower than healthy controls (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Our study results added new evidence for explaining the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia on the basis of neurochemical markers.


Subject(s)
Humans , Biomarkers , Brain , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Fasting , Methods , Psychotic Disorders , Schizophrenia , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase
12.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 2102-2108, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-307460

ABSTRACT

<p><b>BACKGROUND</b>Two recent whole-exome sequencing researches identifying somatic mutations in the ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) gene in pituitary corticotroph adenomas provide exciting advances in this field. These mutations drive increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and promote adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production. This study was to investigate whether the inhibition of USP8 activity could be a strategy for the treatment of Cushing's disease (CD).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>The anticancer effect of USP8 inhibitor was determined by testing cell viability, colony formation, apoptosis, and ACTH secretion. The immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were conducted to explore the signaling pathway by USP8 inhibition.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Inhibition of USP8-induced degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases including EGFR, EGFR-2 (ERBB2), and Met leading to a suppression of AtT20 cell growth and ACTH secretion. Moreover, treatment with USP8 inhibitor markedly induced AtT20 cells apoptosis.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Inhibition of USP8 activity could be an effective strategy for CD. It might provide a novel pharmacological approach for the treatment of CD.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Mice , Adrenocorticotropic Hormone , Metabolism , Apoptosis , Cell Proliferation , Physiology , Cell Survival , Physiology , Endopeptidases , Metabolism , Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport , Metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors , Pharmacology , Indenes , Pharmacology , Pyrazines , Pharmacology , ErbB Receptors , Metabolism , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase , Metabolism
13.
Braz. j. phys. ther. (Impr.) ; 19(3): 167-176, May-Jun/2015. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-751381

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is characterized by anterior knee pain, which may limit the performance of functional activities. The influence of hip joint motion on the development of this syndrome has already been documented in the literature. In this regard, studies have investigated the effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patients with PFPS. Objectives: The aims of this systematic review were (1) to summarize the literature related to the effects of hip muscle strengthening on pain intensity, muscle strength, and function in individuals with PFPS and (2) to evaluate the methodological quality of the selected studies. Method: A search for randomized controlled clinical trials was conducted using the following databases: Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PEDro, LILACS, and SciELO. The selected studies had to distinguish the effects of hip muscle strengthening in a group of patients with PFPS, as compared to non-intervention or other kinds of intervention, and had to investigate the following outcomes: pain, muscle strength, and function. The methodological quality of the selected studies was analyzed by means of the PEDro scale. Results: Seven studies were selected. These studies demonstrated that hip muscle strengthening was effective in reducing pain. However, the studies disagreed regarding the treatments' ability to improve muscle strength. Improvement in functional capabilities after hip muscle strengthening was found in five studies. Conclusion: Hip muscle strengthening is effective in reducing the intensity of pain and improving functional capabilities in patients with PFPS, despite the lack of evidence for its ability to increase muscle strength. .


Subject(s)
Animals , Female , Rats , Afferent Pathways/physiology , Muscle, Skeletal/physiology , Neuronal Plasticity/physiology , Nociception/physiology , Reflex/physiology , Skin/innervation , Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology , Bupivacaine/pharmacology , Dexmedetomidine/pharmacology , Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory/drug effects , Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory/physiology , Muscle, Skeletal/drug effects , Neural Conduction/drug effects , Neuronal Plasticity/drug effects , Nociception/drug effects , Physical Stimulation/adverse effects , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor/metabolism , Reflex/drug effects , Somatostatin/metabolism , Spinal Cord/drug effects , Spinal Cord/metabolism , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/metabolism
14.
Indian J Exp Biol ; 2015 May; 53(5): 305-312
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-158456

ABSTRACT

Spermatogonia, the adult germ cells that initiate spermatogenesis in mammalian testis, are capable of dividing both mitotically and meiotically. Isolation and preservation of spermatogonia helps in preserving genetic pool of endangered animals. In this context, identification of marker(s) that can distinguish spermatogonia from other cells in testis gains significance. Here, we examined the expression of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal esterase L1 (UCHL1) gene and protein in the testes of several mammals, including highly endangered species. Semi-quantitative-reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed presence of UCHL1 amplicon of 442 bp in all the 18 mammals studied. Nucleotide sequence analysis of these amplicons and their predicted protein sequences revealed 88-99% and 95-100% homology with available human UCHL1 and UCHL1 sequences of other available species in the GenBank, respectively. Western blot analysis showed that UCHL1 protein size was unique in all wild mammals. Immunohistology results confirmed UCHL1 expression in the spermatogonia/gonocytes in testes of several mammals belonging to eight distinct families including highly endangered Felidae, Canidae and Cercopithecoidae. These findings suggest that UCHL1 expression is conserved in the mammalian testis, and could be used as a specific marker for gonocytes/spermatogonia for developing male germ-cell based conservation techniques.


Subject(s)
Germ Cells , Endangered Species , Male , Mammals , Testis/genetics , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/genetics
15.
Rev. chil. dermatol ; 31(1): 43-46, 2015. ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-973171

ABSTRACT

El melanoma maligno cutáneo (MMC) es un cáncer genéticamente heterogéneo, en cuya patogénesis participarían varios genes. Algunos de estos activan la vía MAP kinasa (BRAF, NRAS, KIT, NF1), mientras que otros confieren una mayor susceptibilidad a melanoma familiar, como CDKN2A, CDK4, MITF y BAP1. BAP1 (BRCA1-associated-protein 1) ha sido descrito como una proteína que se une a BRCA1 para inhibir el crecimiento celular. Actualmente se sabe que es producto de un gen supresor de tumores (denominado BAP1) y que actúa como una enzima con actividad deubiquitinasa, la cual se asocia a varios complejos de proteínas, regulando diversas vías celulares relacionadas con el ciclo celular, diferenciación y muerte celular, así como también gluconeogénesis y respuesta a daño del ADN. Tanto su actividad deubiquitinasa como su localización nuclear son relevantes para su función en la supresión de tumores.


Malignant cutaneous melanoma (MMC) is a genetically heterogeneous cancer and various genes participate in its pathogenesis. Some of these genes activate the MAP kinase pathway (BRAF, NRAS, KIT, NF1) and others are related to a higher susceptibility to familial melanoma like CDKN2A, CDK4, MITF y BAP1. BAP1 (BRCA1-associated –protein 1) has been described as a BRCA1-binding protein inhibiting cell growth. This protein is a product of a gene with tumor suppressor activity, the protein being a deubiquitinase associated to multiple protein complexes regulating various cellular pathways, including the cell cycle, differentiation and cell death, as well as gluconeogenesis and DNA damage response. Both deubiquitinase activity and location to the nucleus are relevant to its tumor suppressor function.


Subject(s)
Humans , Skin Neoplasms/genetics , Melanoma/genetics , Tumor Suppressor Proteins/genetics , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/genetics , Tumor Suppressor Proteins/metabolism , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/metabolism , Mutation
16.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-239489

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To assess the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ubiquitin-specific protease 8 gene (USP8) with male infertility among ethnic Han Chinese from Sichuan.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>A total of 316 infertile males were recruited (case group), which included 72 severe oligozoospermic (SO) cases and 244 non-obstructive azoospermic (NOA) cases. The control group consisted of 149 fertile males. The genotypes of 4 SNPs (rs2241769, rs11857513, rs7174015 and rs3743044) were determined with a Sequenom MassArray technique. The frequencies of genotype, allele and haploptye were analyzed.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>No significant difference was detected in the allelic or genotypic frequencies of the 4 SNPs between the two groups (P>0.05). Based on linkage disequilibrium analysis and haplotype construction, the frequency distribution of haplotype CAAG showed a significant difference between non-obstructive azoospermic patients and the controls (P=0.021).</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The 4 SNPs (rs2241769, rs11857513, rs7174015 and rs3743044) of USP8 gene may not be associated with male infertility in ethnic Hans from Sichuan. While the haplotype CAAG may be a down-regulating factor for the risk of NOA.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Male , Asian People , Ethnology , Genetics , Azoospermia , Genetics , Base Sequence , Case-Control Studies , China , Ethnology , Endopeptidases , Genetics , Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport , Genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Ethnology , Genotype , Infertility, Male , Ethnology , Genetics , Molecular Sequence Data , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase , Genetics
17.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-255208

ABSTRACT

By regulating the ubiquitination and deubiquitination of key proteins, ubiquitin-proteasome system mediates a variety of cellular activities. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH) is a deubiquitinating enzyme which can remove ubiquitin chains at the end of ubiquited proteins. The abnormal expression of UCH has been found in a variety of tumor tissues, indicating that it participates in the process of tumor development. Here we review the characteristics of UCH members and current understanding about the role of UCH in tumor development, and the potential target for cancer treatment.


Subject(s)
Humans , Carcinogenesis , Disease Progression , Neoplasms , Ubiquitin , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase
18.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 208-213, 2015.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-319518

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To isolate, identify and culture human spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and then obtain purified and enriched human SSCs for research and application.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>We detected the expression of CD90 in the human testis using the immunofluorescence technique and isolated human testicular spermatogenic cells by two-step enzymatic digestion, followed by differential plating and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) with CD90 as an SSC marker. Then we identified the isolated CD90-positive spermatogenic cells by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, and meanwhile cocultured them with Sertoli cells in SG medium in vitro.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The isolated CD90-positive cells showed a relatively homogeneous characteristic in size and morphology and expressed the genes specific for human SSCs, with high expressions (90.5%) of GFRA1, GPR125, and UCHL1. After coculture with Sertoli cells in the SG medium for 2 weeks, the isolated CD90-positive cells maintained a good activity.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>CD90 can be regarded as a speci- fic marker for human SSCs and used to obtain highly enriched human SSCs by differential plating and MACS. Furthermore, the isolated human SSCs can be cultured in SG medium in vitro.</p>


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Adult Stem Cells , Cell Biology , Biomarkers , Metabolism , Cell Separation , Methods , Cell Shape , Cell Size , Coculture Techniques , Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptors , Metabolism , Immunohistochemistry , Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled , Metabolism , Sertoli Cells , Spermatogonia , Cell Biology , Testis , Metabolism , Thy-1 Antigens , Metabolism , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase , Metabolism
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-211054

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Optimal treatment decision and estimation of the prognosis in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is currently based on demographic and clinical predictors. But sometimes, there are limitations in these factors. In this study, we analyzed three central nervous system biomarkers in TBI patients, will discuss the roles and clinical applications of biomarkers in TBI. METHODS: From July on 2013 to August on 2014, a total of 45 patients were included. The serum was obtained at the time of hospital admission, and biomarkers were extracted with centrifugal process. It was analyzed for the level of S-100 beta (S100B), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1). RESULTS: This study included 33 males and 12 females with a mean age of 58.5 (19-84) years. TBI patients were classified into two groups. Group A was severe TBI with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 3-5 and Group B was mild TBI with GCS score 13-15. The median serum concentration of S100B, GFAP, and UCH-L1 in severe TBI were raised 5.1 fold, 5.5 fold, and 439.1 fold compared to mild injury, respectively. The serum levels of these markers correlated significantly with the injury severity and clinical outcome (p<0.001). Increased level of markers was strongly predicted poor outcomes. CONCLUSION: S100B, GFAP, and UCH-L1 serum level of were significantly increased in TBI according to severity and associated clinical outcomes. Biomarkers have potential utility as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic adjuncts in the setting of TBI.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Biomarkers , Brain Injuries , Central Nervous System , Glasgow Coma Scale , Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein , Neurons , Prognosis , S100 Calcium Binding Protein beta Subunit , Ubiquitin , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase
20.
Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz ; 109(1): 1-8, 02/2014. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-703649

ABSTRACT

Several genes related to the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway, including those coding for proteasome subunits and conjugation enzymes, are differentially expressed during the Schistosoma mansoni life cycle. Although deubiquitinating enzymes have been reported to be negative regulators of protein ubiquitination and shown to play an important role in Ub-dependent processes, little is known about their role in S. mansoni . In this study, we analysed the Ub carboxyl-terminal hydrolase (UCHs) proteins found in the database of the parasite’s genome. An in silico ana- lysis (GeneDB and MEROPS) identified three different UCH family members in the genome, Sm UCH-L3, Sm UCH-L5 and Sm BAP-1 and a phylogenetic analysis confirmed the evolutionary conservation of the proteins. We performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and observed a differential expression profile for all of the investigated transcripts between the cercariae and adult worm stages. These results were corroborated by low rates of Z-Arg-Leu-Arg-Gly-Gly-AMC hydrolysis in a crude extract obtained from cercariae in parallel with high Ub conjugate levels in the same extracts. We suggest that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in the cercaria and early schistosomulum stages is related to a decrease in 26S proteasome activity. Taken together, our data suggest that UCH family members contribute to regulating the activity of the Ub-proteasome system during the life cycle of this parasite.


Subject(s)
Animals , Endopeptidases/genetics , Schistosoma mansoni/enzymology , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/genetics , Cercaria/enzymology , Cercaria/genetics , Conserved Sequence/genetics , Evolution, Molecular , Gene Expression , Genome, Helminth/genetics , Genome/genetics , Life Cycle Stages/genetics , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Sequence Alignment , Schistosoma mansoni/genetics , Schistosoma mansoni/growth & development , Transcriptome/physiology , Transcytosis/physiology , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/classification , Ubiquitin-Specific Proteases/genetics , Ubiquitination/physiology
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