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1.
Cureus ; 14(5): e25325, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1897137

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for causing the COVID-19 pandemic and over 4 million deaths globally. Clinical symptoms range from asymptomatic infection, viral syndrome, and pneumonia, to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an acute demyelinating inflammatory polyneuropathy, may be a manifestation of infection and must be recognized quickly by clinicians to avoid neurological deterioration in these patients. Here, we present an interesting case of GBS in a patient with a previous COVID-19 infection. A 63-year-old male with a past medical history of hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obesity, and recent COVID-19 infection just five weeks prior to the presentation without COVID-19 vaccination presented to a family medicine clinic due to a history of falls as well as lower extremity numbness, weakness, and paresthesias for the past 36 hours. The patient's MRI and lumbar puncture were unremarkable and the patient was transferred to a tertiary care center. The patient was diagnosed with GBS secondary to his COVID-19 infection five weeks prior. He received a standard five-dose regimen of 400 mg/kg/day of intravenous immunoglobulin and demonstrated rapid improvement in response to therapy. Temporal factors associated with disease such as the seemingly delayed onset of symptoms after COVID-19 viral infection in comparison to other cases of GBS, as well as the rapid progression of symptomatology, are of note. Healthcare providers should still consider GBS as a possibility in patients with a relatively distant history of COVID-19 infections. Rapid progression of symptoms should also be monitored as this may result in earlier respiratory morbidity and mortality in the absence of appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

2.
Am Surg ; : 31348211060414, 2021 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582793

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted traditional resident recruitment practices, requiring virtual interviews and new forms of outreach. Social media, such as Twitter, is one tool programs can use to connect with applicants. This study sought to assess changes in Twitter use during the COVID-19 pandemic among general surgery programs. METHODS: Twitter and residency program websites were queried for public Twitter accounts related to general surgery residency programs. Publicly available tweets for available accounts were reviewed for all posts for the period March 15, 2019-November 25, 2020. Thematic analysis of each tweet was performed, and engagement was determined by likes and retweets on each tweet. RESULTS: The number of programs with active Twitter accounts increased after the onset of COVID-19 pandemic, as did the number of tweets, likes-, and retweets-per-tweet. There was a significant increase in the number of tweets regarding resident promotion, program promotion, and virtual event promotion. Tweets received more likes-per-tweet if the subject was program promotion and resident promotion than tweets regarding virtual events. All results were statistically significant (P < .05). DISCUSSION: Twitter use and engagement with residency programs have increased significantly since pandemic onset. Engagement is highest for tweets regarding program and resident promotion as measured by likes-per-tweet and highest for program promotion and virtual events as measured by retweets-per-tweet. Given the nearly nationwide increase in Twitter engagement after pandemic onset, programs should consider the impact of Twitter as a means of communication with applicants and program branding.

3.
JCO Clin Cancer Inform ; 5: 394-400, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171727

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 has infected more than 94 million people worldwide and caused more than 2 million deaths. Patients with cancer are at significantly increased risk compared with the general population. Telemedicine represents a common strategy to prevent viral spread. We sought to evaluate patient with cancer and physician perceptions of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A 16-question survey was e-mailed to 1,843 active e-mails of patients presenting to one of the six cancer clinics at a comprehensive cancer care center from January 1, 2020, to June 1, 2020. A six-question survey was e-mailed to attending physicians of those clinics. Specialties included Medical Oncology, Hematology-Oncology, Surgical Oncology, Urological Oncology, and Gynecologic Oncology. RESULTS: Three hundred seventy-four patients (20.3%) and 14 physicians (66.7%) responded. Most (68.2%) currently prefer in-person visits, and 80.4% prefer in-person visits following pandemic resolution. More than half (52.2%) of patients preferring virtual visits do so because of convenience. Most (63.1%) patients with cancer are comfortable with a complete physical examination. Surgical patients are more likely to prefer a complete examination (P = .0476). Physicians prefer in-person visits (64.2%) and believe that virtual visits maybe or probably do not provide comparable care (64.2%). 71.4% believe that virtual visits help prevent the spread of infectious disease. CONCLUSION: Given preferences for in-person visits, cancer care teams should be prepared to continue providing in-person visits for many of their patients. The discrepancy between patient and provider concern for spread of infectious disease represents an area where patients may benefit from increased education. Providers should feel comfortable performing physical examinations at their own discretion.


Subject(s)
Attitude , COVID-19/prevention & control , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Internet , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , Patients/psychology , Patients/statistics & numerical data , Physicians/psychology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Am Surg ; 87(5): 686-689, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Over 28 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 have been reported to date, resulting in over 900 000 deaths. With an increase in awareness regarding the virus, the behavior of general population has changed dramatically. As activities such as driving and hospital presentation patterns have changed, our study aimed to assess the differences in trauma case variables before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Trauma data for the period of March 1st-June 15th were compared for the years 2015-2019 (pre-COVID) and 2020 (COVID). The data were analyzed across the following categories: injury severity score, injury mechanism, motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) vs. other blunt injuries, alcohol involvement, and length of hospital stay. RESULTS: The median injury severity score pre-COVID and during COVID was 9, representing no change. There was no difference in overall distribution of mechanism of injury; however, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of MVCs pre-COVID (36.39%) vs. COVID (29.6%, P < .05). Alcohol was significantly more likely to be involved in trauma during COVID-19 (P < .05). The mean hospital stay increased from 3.87-5.4 days during COVID-19 (P < .05). DISCUSSION: We saw similar results to prior studies in terms of there being no change in trauma severity. Our observation that motor vehicle collisions have decreased is consistent with current data showing decreased use of motor vehicles during the pandemic. We also observed an increase in alcohol-related cases which are consistent with the reported changes in alcohol consumption since the pandemic began.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Trauma Centers/trends , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Georgia/epidemiology , Humans , Injury Severity Score , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Wounds and Injuries/diagnosis , Wounds and Injuries/therapy
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