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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several reports from around the world have reported that some patients who have recovered from COVID-19 have experienced a range of persistent or new clinical symptoms after a SARS-CoV-2 infection. These symptoms can last from weeks to months, impacting everyday functioning to a significant number of patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis based on an online, self-reporting questionnaire was conducted in Ecuador from April to July 2022. Participants were invited by social media, radio, and TV to voluntarily participate in our study. A total of 2103 surveys were included in this study. We compared socio-demographic variables and long-term persisting symptoms at low (<2500 m) and high altitude (>2500 m). RESULTS: Overall, 1100 (52.3%) responders claimed to have Long-COVID symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Most of these were reported by women (64.0%); the most affected group was young adults between 21 to 40 years (68.5%), and most long-haulers were mestizos (91.6%). We found that high altitude residents were more likely to report persisting symptoms (71.7%) versus those living at lower altitudes (29.3%). The most common symptoms were fatigue or tiredness (8.4%), hair loss (5.1%) and difficulty concentrating (5.0%). The highest proportion of symptoms was observed in the group that received less than 2 doses. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study describing post-COVID symptoms' persistence in low and high-altitude residents. Our findings demonstrate that women, especially those aging between 21-40, are more likely to describe Long-COVID. We also found that living at a high altitude was associated with higher reports of mood changes, tachycardia, decreased libido, insomnia, and palpitations compared to lowlanders. Finally, we found a greater risk to report Long-COVID symptoms among women, those with previous comorbidities and those who had a severer acute SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Altitude , COVID-19 , Young Adult , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099511

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many companies to adopt different work modalities to ensure their operation during this period. In this study, we described and compared working conditions and perceptions among face-to-face workers, teleworkers, and hybrid workers in Ecuador. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 542 participants, using a self-report survey to assess sociodemographic data, working conditions, and workers' perceptions. Variables were described and then compared by the Chi-square test, ANOVA, and the Kruskal-Wallis test. The results indicated a higher proportion of on-site workers without higher education and in the public sector compared to the other modalities. At the same time, there was evidence of increased perceived productivity. People in the hybrid modality tended to have more than one job, earning a higher monthly salary, perceiving a decrease in productivity, an increase in daily working hours, and a lower capacity for time management. In addition, most teleworkers reported fair working conditions, a dedicated workspace, and easy adaptation to this work mode. This study builds a more in-depth understanding of how workers perceived their working conditions among work modalities for organizational decision-making because the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic is modifying the ways of working permanently.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Teleworking , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ecuador/epidemiology
3.
Trends in Psychology ; : 1-22, 2022.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-2007352

ABSTRACT

The massive adoption of online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic brought an opportunity to investigate teachers’ conceptions of excellent teaching in the context of emergency remote education. From June to August 2020, we conducted a cross-sectional study using an online questionnaire to (1) analyze teachers’ perceptions of the quality of their teaching in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, (2) identify teachers’ perceptions of the qualities of excellent online teachers, and (3) examine differences based on gender, age, previous online learning training, and work experiences. The sample consisted of 341 university teachers who worked in private and public institutions in Ecuador. Results indicate that most participants perceived online teaching was easy for them, as well as personally satisfying. However, less than half of the participants felt that the quality of their teaching and their relationships with their students had improved since the adoption of online learning. Regarding the qualities of excellent online teachers, participants indicated that being respectful, enthusiastic about their teaching and their topics, striving to become a better teacher, being humble, and being knowledgeable about their subject matter were the top five qualities excellent online teachers should have. Comparison analysis indicated gender differences in some of the items. Women tended to feel more strongly that their relationship with their students had improved since online teaching was adopted;also, they gave higher scores to qualities such as being humble, establishing rapport, being sensitive and persistent, and being understanding compared to men. There were not differences based on age. Regarding online teaching training and work experiences, we found statistical differences in the perceptions on the quality of their teaching and some of the traits of excellent online educators. We found that participants with previous training and work experiences rated more strongly qualities such as being an effective communicator, being prepared and technologically competent. We discuss the implications of these findings considering the challenges that online learning imposes on educators in many parts of the world.

4.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604366, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765685

ABSTRACT

Objectives: to explore the emotional impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Galapagos Islands. Methods: an online survey of 369 participants, conducted on October of 2020, was used to assess levels of depression, anxiety, and stress, as well as specific behavioral and emotional reactions to the pandemic. Results: the prevalence of anxiety was 4% and depression 3.65%. Perceived stress level was higher, with 52% of the sample reporting moderate amounts. Women had higher levels of depression and perceived stress. Financial distress, interpersonal conflicts, feelings of isolation and fear of contagion of COVID-19 were all associated with higher levels of anxiety, depression, and stress. Conclusion: prevalence of anxiety and depression is lower in the Galápagos Islands during the pandemic compared to other regions, while stress levels are more significant and may warrant intervention. Despite being low, anxiety and depression were associated with potentially problematic behaviors and emotional reactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Ecuador/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
5.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604418, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742286

ABSTRACT

Objective: Several studies have investigated the negative toll the pandemic has had on people's mental health. However, there is limited research on the pandemic's effect on positive mental health variables. This article reports on the levels of self-esteem and well-being (flourishing and happiness) in a sample of adults living in Ecuador and their relationships with the characteristics of their personal situation and the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic had on their personal lives. Methods: A total of 766 adults completed an anonymous online survey between March and August 2020. Results: Participants reported average scores in the flourishing scale, the majority considered themselves to be happy or very happy people, and more than half presented high levels of self-esteem. Age, education, socioeconomic status, time spent using mobile phones and on hobbies, among others, explained self-esteem, happiness, and flourishing. Conclusion: The relationships between sociodemographic and situational variables of confinement during the pandemic are discussed, as well as the possible predictors of happiness, flourishing, and self-esteem.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Ecuador/epidemiology , Happiness , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Behav Sci (Basel) ; 12(2)2022 Feb 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674504

ABSTRACT

Procrastination involves voluntarily or habitually delaying unpleasant tasks for later. It is characterized by short-term benefits and long-term costs. The COVID-19 pandemic set specific circumstances that may have influenced procrastination behavior. This scoping review identified the existing peer-reviewed literature in English or Spanish about procrastination during the COVID-19 pandemic (January 2020 to April 2021) in six electronic databases. To conduct the review, a five-step methodological framework, as well as established PRISMA guidelines, was followed. A total of 101 articles were found. After removing duplicates and reviewing the articles, only 13 were included in the review. Findings indicate that procrastination was studied mostly in academic contexts in various parts of the globe. Procrastination behavior was related to anxiety, distress, time management, self-control, and other variables. There is limited information about interventions to prevent or decrease procrastinating behaviors in the context of confinement or in the living conditions generated by the pandemic. Future research should consider how procrastination evolved during the pandemic using longitudinal methodologies. Individual differences related to procrastination also should be identified, and the evaluation of the efficacy of existing interventions is still needed. This information might help in the creation of appropriate interventions that target detrimental procrastination behaviors.

7.
Clin Neuropsychiatry ; 17(6): 361-364, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575946

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak is a pandemic that has strained significantly the capacity of many public and private health systems. To alleviate the burden, many students of health-related professions volunteered to offer their expertise to attend to the health needs of the public. This brief article aims to share a replicable supervision model that is currently in place to care for those volunteers in telecare mental health. The key aspects of this supervision model are the team composition, ongoing group supervision, formally structured supervision sessions, and the objective monitoring of members' well-being.

8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480756

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the lives of millions of people worldwide. This study aimed to analyze the effects of several psychological factors (self-esteem, self-control, and emotional stability) over lifestyle-related variables (time spent on leisure activities) and the levels of satisfaction (family, friends, work, and leisure satisfaction) experienced during the COVID-19 outbreak. Data for this article were retrieved as part of a cross-sectional international study conducted in eleven Spanish-speaking countries between March and September 2020. The analyses were conducted using the responses of 9500 persons (65.95% women, 34.05% men). Structural equation modeling was used to test the direct and indirect effects of the psychological variables on satisfaction variables mediated by the time engaged in leisure activities. Our model indicated that psychological factors significantly predicted the amount of time spent in leisure activities and satisfaction. Overall, results indicate that self-esteem is a relevant psychological factor to consider in the development of psychological interventions directed at promoting healthy lifestyles. Nevertheless, further research is needed to validate the direction of the associations found in this study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Leisure Activities , Male , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Psychol Res Behav Manag ; 14: 933-944, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304519

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study assessed the psychological distress, life satisfaction, and perceived stress of Ecuadorian teachers who adopted online learning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also aimed to qualitatively report the coping strategies used to maintain their mental health and well-being. METHODS: A web-based cross-sectional survey was conducted from June to mid-August 2020. RESULTS: In total, 394 teachers completed the questionnaire, and from those, 320 also completed an optional open-ended question included in the survey. More than half of the participants reported taking care of children under 11 years and/or adults over 65 years. At the time of the study, most of the participants were teaching in higher education settings. Age was significantly correlated with all the psychological variables, females presented higher levels of perceived stress, and teachers with home care responsibilities presented higher psychological distress as well as perceived stress. Teachers who had previous training and experience with online teaching presented lower levels of distress, perceived stress as well as higher levels of life satisfaction. The most used coping strategies included seeking social support, exercising, and engaging in leisure activities. CONCLUSION: The results provide useful information to help develop initiatives that promote teacher well-being. Future studies should consider using a more diverse sample and dedicate attention to work-family conflicts as well as social and structural inequalities that may have a toll on teachers' mental health and performance.

10.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(1): e0008958, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067383

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus has spread rapidly around the globe. Nevertheless, there is limited information describing the characteristics and outcomes of COVID-19 patients in Latin America. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 9,468 confirmed COVID-19 cases reported in Ecuador. We calculated overall incidence, mortality, case fatality rates, disability adjusted life years, attack and crude mortality rates, as well as relative risk and relative odds of death, adjusted for age, sex and presence of comorbidities. A total of 9,468 positive COVID-19 cases and 474 deaths were included in the analysis. Men accounted for 55.4% (n = 5, 247) of cases and women for 44.6% (n = 4, 221). We found the presence of comorbidities, being male and older than 65 years were important determinants of mortality. Coastal regions were most affected by COVID-19, with higher mortality rates than the highlands. Fatigue was reported in 53.2% of the patients, followed by headache (43%), dry cough (41.7%), ageusia (37.1%) and anosmia (36.1%). We present an analysis of the burden of COVID-19 in Ecuador. Our findings show that men are at higher risk of dying from COVID-19 than women, and risk increases with age and the presence of comorbidities. We also found that blue-collar workers and the unemployed are at greater risk of dying. These early observations offer clinical insights for the medical community to help improve patient care and for public health officials to strengthen Ecuador's response to the outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Disease Outbreaks , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Cost of Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ecuador/epidemiology , Female , Geography , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Occupations , Risk Factors , Sex Distribution , Social Class , Symptom Assessment , Unemployment , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0240008, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807110

ABSTRACT

Ecuador has been one of the most affected countries by the Corona Virus Disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, by April 2020 this country presented the highest rates of mortality in Latin America. The purpose of the present study was to identify behaviors during confinement and sociodemographic variables associated with the mental health status of confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients who were part of the epidemiological surveillance program in Ecuador that included mandatory confinement and self-isolation. A cross-sectional study was performed from March 22th to April 18th, 2020 using an online survey. The survey collected socio-demographic information and severity of depressive symptoms using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and anxiety symptoms through the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7. A total of 759 patients completed the questionnaire, 20.3% presented moderate to severe symptoms of depression and 22.5% moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety. Being a woman and from the Coastal region were risk factors. Exercising, maintaining daily routines, and keeping informed about the COVID-19 but limiting to an hour was associated with better mental health. Regression analysis indicated that the mentioned behaviors explained approximately 17% of the variance for depression sum scores and 11.8% of the variance for anxiety sum scores while controlling for gender and region. Understanding the association between sociodemographic variables and psychological states in patients with COVID-19 is relevant to tackle future public mental health problems and to implement health policies that are intended to palliate further psychiatric complications. Promotion of modifiable behaviors such as exercising, maintaining daily routines, and keeping informed about the COVID-19 but limiting to less than an hour is recommended.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Activities of Daily Living , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Contact Tracing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ecuador/epidemiology , Epidemiological Monitoring , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Quarantine , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
13.
Counselling Psychology Quarterly ; : 01-Sep, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-597395
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