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1.
17th International Conference on Web Information Systems and Technologies (WEBIST) ; : 219-226, 2021.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1884607

ABSTRACT

This study aims to determine communication about food security during the COVID-19 Pandemic by Analyzing the Indonesian Government's official Twitter account. This research method uses the NVIVO 12 plus in analyzing data with chart, cluster, and word cloud analysis. This research's data source came from the Food Security Agency Twitter accounts and the Logistics Affairs Agency. This study chose the Food Security Agency and the Logistics Affairs Agency's Twitter social media accounts because they are responsible for Indonesia's food security. The finding of this study, the Food Security Agency is more dominant in discussing communication content related to agriculture, availability of foodstuffs, food needs, and food prices compared to the Logistics Affairs Agency. Meanwhile, the Logistics Affairs Agency is superior in communicating content about rice availability during the COVID-19 pandemic. Content is related to one another, but the most vital link is between foodstuffs and rice availability. The Food Security Agency and Logistics Affairs Agency's communication narrative with the Indonesian people during the COVID-19 pandemic concerns rice, prices, food, and Indonesian farmers. The Logistics Affairs Agency has a higher communication intensity than the Food Security Agency with the Indonesian people in early 2020 to March 2021 period.

2.
Urban Governance ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1882586

ABSTRACT

During COVID-19, the demand for food relief exploded as vulnerable people were suddenly more numerous and visible than ever, for which statutory welfare was not ready to cope with. We examine the role of voluntary and community organizations (VCOs) in food relief in Stockholm, Sweden and Seoul, Korea. Interpretive analysis of interview materials reveals how VCOs perceive their role vis-à-vis the state and take actions against urban food insecurity during the pandemic. The limits of statutory welfare in reaching out to vulnerable individuals reserve an indispensable role for community action in food relief even with the well-developed welfare state. Despite starkly different welfare state contexts, VCOs in both cases complement statutory welfare by swiftly identifying the risk of hunger and organizing community actions to meet the emergent needs. Given that Sweden and Korea represent the least likely cases to observe welfare provision by VCOs, the findings may have implications to general understanding of VCOs as indispensable welfare provider.

3.
Ann Oper Res ; : 1-37, 2022 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1881499

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been experienced as the most significant global disaster after the Spanish flue in 1918. Millions of people lost their life due to a lack of preparedness and ineffective strategies for managing humanitarian supply chains (HSC). Based on the learnings from this pandemic outbreak, different strategies for managing the effective HSC have been explored in the present context of pandemics through a systematic literature review. The findings highlight some of the major challenges faced during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as lack of planning and preparedness, extended shortages of essential lifesaving items, inadequate lab capacity, lack of transparency and visibility, inefficient distribution network, high response time, dependencies on single sourcing for the medical equipment and medicines, lack of the right information on time, and lack of awareness about the protocol for the treatment of the viral disease. Some of the significant learnings observed from this analysis are the use of multiple sourcing of essential items, joint procurement, improving collaboration among all stakeholders, applications of IoT and blockchain technologies for improving tracking and traceability of essential commodities, application of data analytics tools for accurate prediction of next possible COVID wave/disruptions and optimization of distribution network. Limited studies are focused on finding solutions to these problems in managing HSC. Therefore, as a future scope, researchers could find solutions to optimizing the distribution network in context to pandemics, improving tracing and tracking of items during sudden demand, improving trust and collaborations among different agencies involved in HSC.

4.
Independent Journal of Management & Production ; 13(3):S310-S328, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1879676

ABSTRACT

The article reveals the importance of state financial regulation as one of the most important tools for economic growth and ensuring the competitiveness of industries and the economy of Ukraine. The studies of domestic and foreign scientists on the subject of research are analyzed in detail. The state of enterprises of the agricultural sector of Ukraine for the period 2013-2020 has been determined. The study was carried out on the factors of providing agricultural producers with financial resources in terms of the size of the forms of management. The share of unprofitable enterprises in the industry for the same period is also analyzed. The achievements of the agricultural sector are described according to the statistical analysis of the state of socio-economic development of the regions in the period 2020-2021. The methodology for monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of the implementation of the state regional policy in accordance with legislative regulations is described. This made it possible to establish that at the present stage, the financial regulation of the agricultural sector of Ukraine is carried out without proper scientific justification and, as a rule, responds slowly to the requirements of economic practice, especially in the context of deepening the penetration of global processes into the national economy. Approaches to the assessment of the competitive environment of the agrarian sector of Ukraine and the direction of its state regulation are proposed. Theoretical, methodological, and practical aspects of assessing the competitiveness of the sector are disclosed. The necessity and possibility of forming a competitive environment by fiscal policy measures, primarily budgetary regulation, is proved. The problems of forming a competitive environment in the context of the current crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the place of Ukraine in the world competitiveness ranking are identified, and methodological approaches to the development strategy are proposed. It is proved that the competitive strategy is based on the existing resources of the industry (material, financial and intellectual), the level of development of various forms of management, the structure of production, marketing, processing, the formation of value chains and a bilateral state-market regulator. The directions for improving the quality of the competitive environment, arising from the paradigm of innovative development of the agricultural sector, are summarized and provide for the stimulation of small business in niche and organic production and large-scale industrial production in terms of the main indicators of food security, as well as the development of land, financial, credit and resource markets and the formation of equal access to them all agricultural producers.

5.
Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies ; 12(3):531-547, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1878906

ABSTRACT

Purpose>In the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic, Vietnam imposed many drastic restrictions to curb the outbreak of this virus. Such restrictions interrupted the normal functioning of various economic sectors, including agriculture. This research examined disruptions to agricultural activities, income loss and perceived food insecurity among farm households during the pandemic, and then explored the relationships among these economic factors.Design/methodology/approach>Household data from Vietnam and Generalized Structural Equation Model (GSEM) were used for empirical analysis.Findings>Descriptive analyses found that only a small proportion of farm households suffered from the COVID-19 disruptions to their agricultural activities, a large percentage experienced income loss, and a medium number were worried about their food insecurity. GSEM results also revealed that the COVID-19 disruptions to agricultural activities significantly increased the likelihood of worrying about food insecurity, mediated by income loss.Research limitations/implications>Due to data limitations, the authors could not use better indicators to define and measure the variables of interest (e.g. COVID-19 disruptions to agricultural activities, income loss and food insecurity). Another similar concern was that our models did not account for unobservables, causing some estimation biases.Originality/value>This research is among the first attempts that examined the direct and indirect (mediated by income loss) effects of the COVID-19 disruptions to agricultural activities on food insecurity.

6.
Future Foods: Global Trends, Opportunities, and Sustainability Challenges ; : 515-525, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1878022

ABSTRACT

Poverty affects ~ 26% of the world’s population and is a challenge that humanity must overcome by the end of 2030, as per the agenda set by the United Nations. Witnessing the current world scenario, it is crucial to find an alternative to overcome this challenge, especially in the context of the situation of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is expected to affect consumers directly or indirectly. With this in mind, this chapter is designed to analyze the value of traditional foods and their importance in planning and adopting strategies to strengthen local, regional, and global food systems. The revaluation of traditional food systems is certainly a good option, which can overcome emergencies of food insecurity such as famines and droughts or unprecedented occurrences such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which the world has recently experienced. Based on this logic, institutional resilience can be defined as the capacity to adapt or transform institutional norms or arrangements in a territory. In this context, the concept of traditional foods allows the witnessing and practice of historically inherited cultural expressions. Finally, to ensure the sustainability of traditional foods, it is imperative that local governments design appropriate policies to befit future generations. © 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

7.
Future Foods: Global Trends, Opportunities, and Sustainability Challenges ; : 107-131, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1878021

ABSTRACT

Global food security is threatened by the confluence of increasing demand for food due to a growing population and the inability of the food production system to meet the increasing demand due to climate change, worsening soil fertility, and challenges to water availability. These factors jeopardize achieving the Sustainable Development Goals such as Zero Hunger, food and nutrition security, and climate action, particularly in developing countries. Vulnerable and marginalized groups in these countries, such as women, widows, people with disabilities, and resource-poor households living in vulnerable areas, suffer disproportionately from food insecurity. This inequality is likely to increase in the coming decades due to disproportionate access to resources. Major economic shocks such as the global food price rise of 2007-08 and the Covid-19 pandemic have weakened the fight against ensuring nutritional and food security and achieving the SDGs goal of Zero Hunger and poverty. COVID-19 further exhibits the existing gap in access to health systems and highlights the crucial need for a well-designed public safety net to cope with any unexpected shocks in the future. Achieving food security requires several transformations in agricultural as well as socio-economic policies such as targeting susceptible communities, promoting climate-smart agricultural practices, improving the resilience of resource-poor households, setting up a strong social safety nets program, reducing post-harvest losses and food waste, and ensuring an efficient food distribution mechanism. © 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875582

ABSTRACT

There are no previous studies reporting the type and quantity of pesticides for farming from Sierra Leone and the impact of Ebola or COVID-19 on importation. This study reviewed imported farming pesticides by the Sierra Leone, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF), between 2010-2021. It was a descriptive study using routinely collected importation data. We found the MAF imported pesticides for farming only during 2010, 2014 and 2021, in response to growing food insecurity and associated with Ebola and COVID-19 outbreaks. Results showed insecticide importation increased from 6230 L in 2010 to 51,150 L in 2021, and importation of antimicrobial pesticides (including fungicides) increased from 150 kg in 2010 to 23,560 kg in 2021. The hazard class risk classification of imported pesticides decreased over time. Increasing amounts of imported fungicides could increase the risk of future fungal resistance among humans. We found that in responding to escalating food insecurity, the government dramatically increased the amount of pesticide importation to improve crop production. Further support is necessary to decrease the risk of worsening food shortages and the possible threat of emerging antimicrobial resistance. We recommend continued monitoring and surveillance, with further studies on the most appropriate response to these multiple challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fungicides, Industrial , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Pesticides , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Disease Outbreaks , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Humans , Sierra Leone/epidemiology
9.
Journal of Taiwan Agricultural Research ; 71(1):1-10, 2021.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1871972

ABSTRACT

The pandemics of infectious diseases that have emerged in the course of the development of human civilization have caused great impacts on life, economy, environment, and livelihood, and have also created social turmoil in the world. The outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19, also known as new coronavirus 2019-nCoV) that we are experiencing is one of them. The impact of COVID-19 is not only wide-ranging and far-reaching but also harmful to human health. So far, at least 192 countries and regions around the world have reported more than 162 million confirmed cases, and the death toll exceeds 3.367 million and is still increasing. Many pieces of evidence show that COVID-19 affects the processes of agriculture and the food supply chain, mainly due to changing the state and pattern of food supply and demand and the inconvenience of transportation, the decline in purchasing power, and the greater impact on the most vulnerable groups. Food demand and food security are greatly threatened, and farmers are facing even worse challenges. As the pandemic expands daily, many governments have adopted more stringent response measures to curb the spread of the virus, and should also respond to the food system as well. Many measurements must be implemented to protect people's health and food security, sustain farm operation momentum and farmers' livelihoods, and accelerate the upgrading of the agriculture industry. Those include: making full use of modern technology and policy tools, such as smart agriculture and digital technology (e.g., Information and Communication Technology, Internet of Things, Big Data, Cloud Computing and Automatic Systems), interest rate adjustment and change tariffs and subsidies. Our government should also adopt diversified strategies and measures in response to the needs of the food supply and demand system and the needs of different stakeholders, ranging from technical support, capital (fund) loans, marketing counseling to special relief programs. As long as the economic fundamentals are maintained and the operation mechanism of the production and marketing chain and food security are functioning, it will surely be able to sustain a stable situation in the long pandemic. When the COVID-19 virus is brought under control, all situations will gradually return to a normal state and new opportunities will emerge for economic, social, and personal development. Hopefully, this article can be used for reference, which might trigger the collective brainstorming from all dimensions in order to help all domestic agricultural practitioners to develop relevant adaptation strategies and measures.

10.
Journal of Food Quality ; 2022, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871766

ABSTRACT

Introduction. Currently, Ethiopia, in particular, the rural areas of Ethiopia, faces high levels of food insecurity. In spite of the fact that there have been many studies on food security, most of them have been conducted in specific national settings. Hence, the determinants of food insecurity should be assessed at the national level. Therefore, this study was primarily aimed to identify the determinant factors of household food insecurity in rural Ethiopia. Method. A cross-sectional Ethiopian socioeconomic survey (ESS) data collected from September 2018 to August 2019 was utilized. A sample of 3115 households was selected from 316 clusters across rural Ethiopia using a two-stage probability sampling technique. To identify the determinants of food insecurity, logistic regression was applied. Results. Among 3,115 households, 50.05% of them were food insecure. Factors such as the household head being aged from 30 to 64 (AOR = 0.786, 95% CI: [0.635, 0.973]), widowed, divorced, or separated (AOR = 1.588, 95%CI: [1.001, 2.518]), literate (AOR = 0.702, 95%CI: [0.590, 0.834]), household aid (AOR = 1.339, 95%CI: [1.089, 1.648]), drought-affected (AOR = 0.640, 95%CI: [0.507, 0.808]), nonagricultural business (AOR = 0.655, 95%CI: [0.472, 0.908]), dependency ratio from 50 to 75% (AOR = 0.680, 95%CI: [0.534, 0.867]), having 6 to 10 livestock (AOR = 0.644, 95%CI: [0.496, 0.836]), and more than 10 livestock (AOR = 0.362, 95% CI: [0.284, 0.461]) were found to be significantly associated with the household’s food insecurity at 5% level of significance. Conclusion. The household head’s age from 30 to 64, being literate, drought-affected, having nonagricultural business, dependency ratio from 50 to 75%, and owning more than 10 livestock have been negatively affecting food insecurity. While supporting households, a “widowed, divorced, or separated” household head has had a positive effect on food insecurity in rural Ethiopia positively influencing food insecurity in rural Ethiopia. Policymakers need to pay special attention to very young and old-aged household heads, adult education, household self-help, livestock improvement, and entrepreneurship while implementing poverty reduction programs.

11.
Collaborative Anthropologies ; 14(2):104-117, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871738

ABSTRACT

In this article we reflect upon recursive temporalities that shaped collaborative work on campus food insecurity. Our research examined disparities in access to food and dining services in order to understand the strategies college students use to mitigate the challenges of obtaining food and to develop suggestions to reduce the prevalence of food insecurity at our school. This collaborative endeavor and our research findings are both framed by perceptions and limitations of time. Within our team, we navigated semester turnover, cyclical incorporation of student researchers, competing commitments, and different time frames for quantitative and qualitive data collection and analysis. Our research participants-college students-juggled multiple responsibilities and experienced temporal shifts by semester, advancement through their school years, and housing changes that significantly impacted their food practices. Time constraints and conflicting temporal rhythms shaped our research and contextualized student engagements with food, creating challenges for conducting collaborative research and for students everyday access to meals. We argue for a reflexive consideration of the multiple temporalities, countertempos, and hidden rhythms that shape collaboration and contextualize research conducted on college campuses.

12.
Sustainability ; 14(10):5782, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871589

ABSTRACT

Increasing agricultural output by reducing capital misallocation is a capital-saving strategy, as it does not require the usage of additional inputs. Based on the panel data of 36 prefecture-level cities in Northeast China from 2011 to 2020, this paper uses the spatial Durbin model to test the impact of capital mismatch on agricultural output and its mechanisms. We found that capital misallocation is prevalent in prefecture-level cities, showing a spatial distribution characteristic of “north-south confrontation and central collapse”, with a significant spatial spillover effect. A one-unit increase in capital misallocation leads to a 16.00% decrease in local agricultural output and a 1.80% decrease in adjacent areas. However, with the optimization and upgrading of the agricultural industry and agricultural technology progress, the inhibitory effect of capital misallocation on the growth of agricultural output is constantly weakening. The above conclusion still holds after a series of robustness tests. The conclusion of this paper provides policy inspiration for promoting the rational allocation of factors between cities and regions, coordinating regional coordinated development, and then promoting the sustainable growth of agricultural output.

13.
Eurasian Journal of Business and Management ; 10(1):62-75, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871524

ABSTRACT

High incidence of drought and donor fatigue in Zimbabwe calls for more sustainable measures of ensuring food security. This study analyzed the impact of nutritional gardens in the two droughtprone districts of Mudzi and Mutoko. In line with attaining Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) targeted to be achieved by 2030, nutritional gardens were identified as a sustainable way to mitigate climate change and address the 'hidden hunger' challenge. Primary data was collected using a baseline framework adopting a triangulation methodology of questionnaires, interviews and focus group discussions (FGDs) across 100 households and key informant stakeholders. Data for 48 households was usable. Results indicated that majority are low-income earners. There are high levels of deforestation and siltation, low water table and low harvest due to frequent droughts. Main crops are drought resistant crops such as millet, sorghum and legumes like groundnuts. Gardens present great potential for food and nutrition supplement and income from the sale of horticultural products. COVID-19 increased vulnerability of all stakeholders across the whole value-chain. The study recommends more drought-resistant varieties, horticultural products, solar powered boreholes and value-adding processes like peanut butter and yoghurt production to optimize local resources.

14.
Food and Energy Security ; 11(2), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871285

ABSTRACT

Improved canopy structure was instrumental in setting maize yield records, and yet it has rarely been examined in China. At Qitai Farm in Xinjiang, we conducted a 4‐year field experiment using China's six highest‐yielding maize hybrids sorted into three yield level groups that were grown at similar growth durations and at optimum densities. The average yield of high‐yield level (HL, 22.3 Mg ha−1) was 7.2% and 24.6% higher than that of medium‐yield level (ML) and low‐yield level (LL), respectively. For each yield level, we measured morphological traits that influence canopy structure and yield. They included plant height, ear height, ear ratio, internode length, leaf numbers, leaf angle, LOV, leaf area, and spatial density of leaf area. Among the preceding morphological traits of the three yield levels, HL’s best optimized the canopy structure, as shown by improved light distribution (19.0% light transmission at the ear) and increased light interception per unit leaf area per day (LIPA, 51.7 MJ m−2 day−1) in the canopy. In comparison, light transmission was 12.2% and 15.9% at the ear and the total LIPAs were 37.2 and 29.0 MJ m−2 day−1 at silking for ML and LL, respectively. HL had significantly longer leaf area duration and a higher photosynthetic rate, especially at the grain filling stage, and its total accumulated biomass at maturity was significantly better (by 13.9%) than LL’s. HL’s harvest index (0.54) was significantly higher than that of ML (0.52) and LL (0.48). HL’s radiation and heat use efficiencies were 2.61% and 1.37 g °C−1 day−1 m−2, both significantly greater than those of ML and LL. Therefore, optimum maize plant types can significantly improve canopy structure and increase resource use efficiency and grain yield.

15.
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Agricolas ; 13(3):553-565, 2022.
Article in English, Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1871146

ABSTRACT

Food security and hunger, linked to rural poverty, in Mexico are among the greatest challenges since they include large sectors of the population, which are exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of this essay is to analyze the food security of family farming and rural poverty in Mexico. A systemic analytical framework was developed, which considered the food crisis, food security, agriculture and the agricultural development modality followed by Mexico. Family farming was addressed through the stratification developed by SAGARPA and FAO, as well as the conditions of marginalization and income poverty. According to the analysis, with the neoliberal model, Mexico specialized agricultural production towards export crops and agricultural growth, production that increased in recent years, achieving a surplus agri-food balance, which means food availability, but not food security for people in extremely rural poverty. It is concluded that there is a close relationship between rural poverty and food security, the latter linked to social inequality in income distribution, among other inequalities, which generates a circle of low income-poverty-food insecurity that occurs and reproduces socially in family farming. The strengthening of assets, agri-food production and income in family farming are fundamental for overcoming rural poverty and building a more equitable society.

16.
Food Security Issues and Challenges ; : 355-382, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1870973

ABSTRACT

Although the right to food has been recognized as a basic human right, its full realization is far from being a reality. The measures implemented to contain the COVID-19 pandemic worldwide have led to an increase in poverty and food insecurity, posing additional challenges to the short- and long-term realization of this basic human right. The present chapter discusses the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on food insecurity in Uruguay, a high-income country in Latin America, as well as the strategies implemented in the country to improve access to food among the most vulnerable sectors of the population. Using Uruguay as a case study, the chapter intends to contribute to the identification of food policies that could contribute to the full realization of the right to food in the context of COVID-19 and beyond. © 2021 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

17.
Generations Journal ; 45(2):1-11, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1870672

ABSTRACT

Food insecurity is an enormous problem in the United States, including in the older adult population, with notable negative health impacts such as malnutrition. Food insecurity has increased with the COVID-19 pandemic. Federal nutrition programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and the Older Americans Act Nutrition Services Program can help alleviate food insecurity. These programs have had some issues, both pre- and post-pandemic, but have been able to adapt to meet the challenges they faced. Food insecurity must be tackled head-on to invest in better health for all older Americans.

18.
Nutrients ; 14(11)2022 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869721

ABSTRACT

The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an emerging respiratory infection with severe impacts on the nutritional status of the worldwide population. This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the food insecurity, dietary diversity, and food-related coping strategies in Jordan during the pandemic using an online, self-administered questionnaire. Among the 740 adults who completed the survey, the prevalence of food security was 84.1%, whereas 2% and 13.9% were moderately and severely food-insecure, respectively. The determinants of food insecurity were educational level, monthly income, marital status, availability of health insurance, and type of residence. In addition, food insecurity was significantly higher among the participants who consumed two or fewer meals per day (p = 0.015). Moreover, an acceptable food consumption score was shown among 76.2% of the participants, and the remaining participants were at borderline (14.1%) or had poor scores (9.7%), with a significant association between food insecurity and food consumption scores (p < 0.001). The food-related coping strategies studied were significantly associated with food insecurity at both levels (p < 0.001) and were more evident in the severely food-insecure group. These findings highlight the adverse effects of COVID-19 restrictions on nutritional status, especially among food-insecure households, which might reduce food accessibility due to economic difficulties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Food Insecurity , Food Supply , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology
19.
Agrociencia ; 56(2):316-335, 2022.
Article in English, Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1865785

ABSTRACT

The current health crisis due to the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is challenging several of the assumptions of a globalized world. There are severe consequences over food security and sovereignty, especially among the poorest and most vulnerable populations. Particularly, since any infectious disease outbreak is directly correlated to an increase in hunger and malnutrition. This assay is set to analyze the impacts of the sanitary crisis on food security and sovereignty in the international context, and highlight how governments are acting to reduce consequences, through the use of an exploratory and analytical methodology. Although the United States (U.S.) has successfully overcome this health crisis, the food crisis has overtaken, as a result of the growing unemployment. In Latin America, the pandemic is exacerbating food access and economic situation. The sanitary crisis has aggravated food shortages in Africa already going on, especially in rural areas. Asia suffered the most significant impact in food security. The new food security policy in the European Union aims to hold food security. Food insecurity and malnutrition are not just about agriculture production;they are also about food access limitations. In consequence, this health crisis cannot be allowed to become also a food crisis.

20.
Journal of Global Health Reports ; 6(e2022024), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1865746

ABSTRACT

Haiti's Central Plateau region suffers from significant malnutrition, economic hardship, and a crisis level of food insecurity. Already the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, Haiti has pervasively high malnutrition rates, but the Central Plateau is among the most severely affected areas. One in five children of the Central Plateau suffers from malnutrition, and the region exhibits a devastating 30% rate of child stunting. Our US-based team affiliated with Klinik Sen Jozef, a community-respected medical clinic in the Central Plateau city of Thomassique. We partnered with local Haitian leadership, a local agronomist, and Trees That Feed Foundation to introduce breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) and an innovative development model to combat local malnutrition. Five years into the program, we have partnered with 152 farmers, and we have enhanced our malnutrition program with breadfruit derivatives. This report addresses the lessons we learned to assist others looking to introduce models or crops in a similar manner. Our experience is particularly significant in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, as supply chain disruptions have worsened food insecurity for more than 800 million people in low-income countries.

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