Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 30
Filter
1.
Vaccine ; 40(47): 6849-6856, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069773

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Delays in the spread of vaccination have been recognized as an urgent public health issue in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccine literacy (VL) is a critical determinant of vaccine uptake; however, little is known about VL among pregnant women and mothers of young children. METHODS: We analyzed data from a nationwide, cross-sectional internet survey in Japan on VL and vaccine hesitancy, conducted with 1,639 pregnant women and 5,688 mothers of young children who had given birth after July 2019, between July 24 and August 30, 2021. RESULTS: Vaccine hesitancy was observed in 51.1 % of pregnant women and 31.9 % of mothers of young children. The risk of vaccine hesitancy was significantly higher among pregnant women with lower interactive/critical skills (risk ratio [RR] 2.10, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.59, 2.78, p < 0.001), although functional skills did not significantly correlate with vaccine hesitancy. For mothers of young children, we found a significantly higher risk of vaccine hesitancy among those with low VL functional skills (RR 1.38, 95 % CI 1.19, 1.61), p < 0.001) and low interactive/critical skills (RR 1.29, 95 % CI 1.10, 1.50, p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that aiding individuals to correctly evaluate vaccine-related information is critical for improving vaccine acceptance rates among both pregnant women and mothers of young children. Meanwhile, improving the comprehensibility of communication toolkits may be important for women with children but have a limited effect among pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Child , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Child, Preschool , Pregnant Women , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Literacy , Vaccination Hesitancy , Japan , Pandemics , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination
2.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(9)2022 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010353

ABSTRACT

Vaccine literacy of healthcare workers (HCWs) may affect the COVID-19 vaccine uptake of the general population. This study aimed to clarify the vaccine literacy level of HCWs in Japan and its impacts on their concerns about vaccines and intention to recommend that others receive vaccines. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in July 2021 based on the recruitment of HCWs in a pediatric and maternity hospital and research center in Tokyo, Japan. All HCWs in this center had the chance to receive the COVID-19 vaccine before the survey, and their vaccine coverage was relatively high, at 95%. A total of 1519 workers answered the questionnaire. The results showed that HCWs with lower functional vaccine literacy had 1.5 times as many concerns about the efficacy of vaccines and 1.6 times as many concerns about the future side effects compared with those with higher literacy. Further, HCWs with higher vaccine literacy were more likely to recommend that older people, people with comorbidities, and pregnant women receive vaccines. Our findings suggest that high vaccine literacy alleviates concerns about COVID-19 vaccines and raised the intention to recommend vaccines to others. To achieve high vaccine coverage, countermeasures such as personalized education are essential.

3.
Patient Prefer Adherence ; 16: 2365-2374, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009788

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Unvaccinated older adults with COVID-19 are at higher risk for severe illness and complications compared with those have been vaccinated. Vaccine literacy and attitudes are important factors that enhance healthy behaviors and choices, including vaccination intention. Objective: To explore vaccine literacy, attitudes, and vaccination intention toward COVID-19 among Thai older adults and examine associations between vaccine literacy, attitudes, and vaccination intention. Methods: This study used a cross-sectional online design. We surveyed 408 older adults who met our inclusion criteria. Participants were recruited online via social media and websites. The survey covered demographic data, vaccine literacy, attitudes, and intention to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Results: COVID-19 vaccination intention among Thai older adults was high (81.3%). Females and those aged 60-69 years had higher COVID-19 vaccine literacy scores than males (t = -2.120, p < 0.05) and those aged ≥70 years (t = 2.438, p < 0.05). Participants with postgraduate education and those who were health professionals scored higher for vaccine literacy than less educated (t = -3.501, p < 0.01) and non-health professional (t = 5.437, p < 0.001) participants. Those with an adequate income or that had been vaccinated against COVID-19 scored significantly higher for vaccine literacy and attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine than participants with an inadequate income (t = 4.626, p < 0.001) or that had not been vaccinated (t = 2.842, p < 0.01). Vaccine literacy (r = 0.219, p < 0.001) and attitudes (r = 0.459, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with vaccination intention. Conclusion: COVID-19 vaccine literacy and attitudes are significant factors related to vaccination intention. Health professionals could play an important role in enhancing vaccine literacy among older adults. Positive attitudes and COVID-19 vaccine literacy may enhance vaccination uptake in older adults.

4.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1296, 2022 07 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974133

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study applies the Patient Self-Advocacy scale to investigate vaccine hesitancy in New Zealand. Due to New Zealand's very limited tertiary hospital system and vulnerable populations, the Government's strategy to address COVID-19 has been to prevent the virus from entering the nation and to eliminate it when it does cross the border. Therefore, there is no opportunity for the nation to generate any acquired immunity through exposure. To transition from closed borders, New Zealand will need to run a highly successful national vaccination programme and this needs to have the ability to drive influential public health messaging to the targeted places within the communities where vaccine hesitancy most exists. METHODS: This study employed statistical methods. A nationally representative survey of adults in New Zealand (n = 1852) was collected via Qualtrics. Independent samples t-tests, and multiple regression were used to explore the research questions. RESULTS: Those who identify as medically able to be vaccinated expressed significantly higher confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine than those who identified as unable to be vaccinated. Patient-self advocacy had a positive effect on vaccine confidence. Individuals who identify as able to be vaccinated have less hesitancy. Demographics had various effects on vaccine hesitancy. CONCLUSION: The research highlights particularly important insights into vaccine hesitancy related to patient self-advocacy behaviours, and various demographic variables such as political affiliation. In addition, the research adds further clarity on how and why New Zealanders have responded to the COVID-vaccine. Finally, the importance of vaccine literacy is discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Parents , Vaccination , Vaccination Hesitancy
5.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(7)2022 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917862

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 mutants, waning immunity, and breakthrough infections prompted the use of booster doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to fight against the pandemic. India started booster doses in January 2022 and it is critical to determine the intention of booster dose uptake and its correlates. Therefore, the current cross-sectional study aimed to investigate booster dose acceptability and associated predictors among the Indian population. A convenience sampling technique was utilized to recruit a sample of 687 Indian residents. A 55-item psychometric validated survey tool was used to assess booster dose acceptability, vaccine literacy and vaccine confidence. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical methods were used to analyze the data. Over 50% of participants reported their willingness to take the booster dose. Among the group not willing to take the booster dose (n = 303, 44.1%), a significantly larger proportion of respondents were unvaccinated with the primary series (12.2% vs. 5.2%, p < 0.001), had an annual income below 2.96 lacs/annum (52.8% vs. 33.1, p < 0.001), were residents of rural areas (38.0% vs. 23.2%, p < 0.001), were not living with vulnerable individuals (78.5% vs. 65.2%, p < 0.001) and did not have family/friends who had tested positive for COVID-19 (54.6% vs. 35.1%, p = 0.001). Demographic, vaccine variables and multi-theory model subscales to predict the initiation of booster dose among hesitant participants were statistically significant, R2 = 0.561, F (26, 244) = 11.978, p < 0.001; adjusted R2 = 0.514. Findings of this study highlight the need to develop evidence-based interventions to promote vaccine uptake, particularly among hard-to-reach communities living in developing countries.

6.
Vaccines ; 10(5):682, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871300

ABSTRACT

Vaccine literacy (VL) mediates the transfer of information and facilitates vaccination acceptance. The aims of this study are to validate the HLVa-IT (Health Literacy Vaccinale degli adulti in Italiano—Vaccine health literacy for adults in Italian language) for the staff of nursing homes (NHs), to measure VL in such a peculiar target group, and to assess its relationship with the sources used to obtain information about vaccines and vaccinations. A survey has been conducted in a sample of Tuscan NHs using an online questionnaire. Eight-hundred and fifty-three questionnaires were analyzed. Two dimensions of the HLVa-IT appeared (functional and interactive/communicative/critical VL). The HLVa-IT interactive/communicative/critical subscale score was slightly higher than the functional subscale, although with no statistical significance. General practitioners (GPs) or other professionals have been reported as the main source of information by most of the respondents (66.1%). The HLVa-IT total score was significantly higher among those who have declared to use official vaccination campaigns (mean score: 3.25 ± 0.49;p < 0.001), GPs or other health professionals (3.26 ± 0.47;p < 0.001), and search engines (3.27 ± 0.48;p = 0.040) as the main sources of information. In conclusion, the HLVa-IT could be reliable test to investigate VL for staff of NHs, and also to highlight criticalities related to information sources.

7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 05 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869620

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy, long considered a global health threat, poses a major barrier to effective roll-out of COVID-19 vaccination. With less than half (45%) of adult South Africans currently fully vaccinated, we identified factors affecting non-uptake of vaccination and vaccine hesitancy in order to identify key groups to be targeted when embarking upon COVID-19 vaccine promotion campaigns. A cross-sectional, anonymous online survey was undertaken among the South African adult population in September 2021. Our research identified race, interactive-critical vaccine literacy, trust in the government's ability to roll out the COVID-19 vaccination programme, flu vaccination status and risk perception for COVID-19 infection as key factors influencing the uptake of COVID-19 vaccination. Respondents who did not trust in the government's ability to roll out vaccination were almost 13 times more likely to be vaccine-hesitant compared to those respondents who did trust the government. Reliable, easy-to-understand information regarding the safety of COVID-19 vaccines is needed, but it is also important that vaccination promotion and communication strategies include broader trust-building measures to enhance South Africans' trust in the government's ability to roll out vaccination effectively and safely. This may also be the case in other countries where distrust in governments' ability prevails.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , South Africa/epidemiology , Vaccination , Vaccination Hesitancy
8.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(6)2022 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869869

ABSTRACT

Compared to many other developed countries, South Africa has a lower uptake of COVID-19 vaccinations. Although not widely researched, there is evidence that vaccine literacy (VL) is positively associated with vaccination uptake. Therefore, this study aimed to assess levels of VL among the adult population in South Africa, as well as to identify factors associated with limited VL. A cross-sectional, anonymous online survey was conducted during September 2021. The survey, which included the standardized Health Literacy about Vaccination in adulthood (HLVa) Scale, was widely advertised, yielding a total of 10,466 respondents. The average scores for the two HLVa sub-scales were relatively high: functional (M = 2.841, SD 0.799) and interactive-critical (M = 3.331, SD 0.559) VL. A proposed 'limited' VL score (score value ≤ 2.50) was observed in 40% of respondents for functional literacy and 8.2% of respondents for interactive-critical literacy. The main factors associated with limited VL included lower levels of education, lower socio-economic status, not being vaccinated against COVID-19, self-identifying as Black/African or Colored (i.e., people of mixed ethnic descent), having poorer health, and being a woman. The significant association between VL and vaccination uptake provides an impetus for policy makers such as the South African Department of Health to promote VL in the attempt to increase COVID-19 vaccination uptake.

9.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(5)2022 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869845

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite the availability of COVID-19 vaccines and the proven benefits of vaccinations outweighing the potential risks, hesitancy to accept vaccines and additional doses remains a persistent problem. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to investigate hesitancy, confidence, literacy, and the role of the multi-theory model (MTM) constructs in COVID-19 booster uptake. Methods: This cross-sectional study utilized a 52-item psychometric valid web-based survey conducted during the month of October 2021 to recruit a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical tests were used to analyze the data. Results: Among the booster hesitant group (n = 209, 41.7%), a significantly larger proportion of respondents were unvaccinated with the primary series (43.5% vs. 11%, p < 0.001), were among 18-44 years age group (51.2% vs. 31.8%, p < 0.001), single or never married (33.0% vs. 24.3%, p = 0.04), had lower education with some high school (6.2% vs. 2.4%, p = 0.03), and identified themselves as Republicans (31.6% vs. 20.5%, p = 0.01). The hesitant group had lower mean scores of vaccine literacy, and vaccine confidence, and had 19% lower odds of behavioral confidence than their non-hesitant counterparts (adjusted odds ratio = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.71-0.92). Conclusions: The findings of this study underscore the need of raising public awareness through effective multi-theory-model-based communication campaigns.

10.
Bioscience Research ; 19(1):370-380, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1848696

ABSTRACT

To evaluate vaccine literacy, attitudes and perception among the general Saudi population and its association with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, the study utilized a descriptive correlational research design using a purposive sampling technique, in which data was obtained from 2,514 respondents from 13 provinces in Saudi Arabia. The information was gathered through social media. The results show that there were slightly more females intend to be vaccinated than males. Although the respondents showed little interest in vaccination against flu, most were willing to be vaccinated against COVID 19. The results regarding attitudes to COVID-19 immunization suggest that the respondents have a positive assessment of being vaccinated. The overall, male, and female populations' vaccine literacy functional and interactive-critical scores revealed that the female population had a considerably higher mean functional score than the male population. Age is connected to the decision whether or not to accept the COVID 19 vaccine, the older age group prefers to have the vaccine, while the younger respondents would rather take their chance through natural immunity.

11.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(5): 2050121, 2022 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764460

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccination is an effective intervention preventing individuals from contracting SARS-CoV-2 or transmitting the virus to others. However, in many countries, vaccine hesitancy has impeded the progress of mass vaccination to reach herd immunity. This study aimed to understand the similarities and differences in the determinants of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Taiwan, the United States, the Netherlands, and Haiti. A qualitative study was conducted by face-to-face interviews with participants in Taiwan and remote online interviews with participants in the United States, the Netherlands, and Haiti. In total, 47 interviews were conducted. A reflective thematic analysis was employed to analyze the collected data. Distrust of COVID-19 vaccines was reported by the participants in all countries. A perception of a lack of necessity or urgency to be vaccinated was reported by the Taiwanese and Haitian participants. Lack of knowledge regarding COVID-19 vaccines was reported by the Taiwanese, U.S. and Haitian participants, contributing to hesitation or refusal to vaccination. Regarding misinformation and rumors, misinformation was found among a few Taiwanese and Dutch participants. Additionally, rumors concerning COVID-19 vaccines were mentioned by the Dutch and Haitian participants. Furthermore, a lack of verified information was reported by the participants in all four countries. Overall, the current study suggests that vaccine hesitancy exists among participants in Taiwan, the United States, the Netherlands, and Haiti. Building trust in the COVID-19 vaccine, cultivating vaccine literacy, clarifying misinformation and rumors concerning COVID-19 vaccines, and providing verified information are critical for increasing public acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Haiti/epidemiology , Humans , Netherlands , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Taiwan , Trust , United States , Vaccination , Vaccination Hesitancy
12.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 31(4): 857-867, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741407

ABSTRACT

The 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) is dubbed as one of the deadliest and worst global pandemics. Many pandemic policies and programs were implemented in different countries across the globe, including the creation of vaccines that would enhance human immunity against the symptoms caused by the virus. Since then, debates on vaccines have emerged, citing vaccine hesitancy often associated with certain factors like socioeconomic status, beliefs, and vaccine awareness. This birthed to an intensive call for vaccine literacy as an effective means of encouraging people to get vaccinated against viruses. This paper uses the Walker and Avant's (2019, Strategies for theory construction in nursing, 6th edn. New York, NY: Pearson) approach of concept analysis with the help of its eight systematic stages. Results showed that vaccine literacy was adopted after the concept of health literacy. It is defined as a process of providing vaccine information, building communication, and increasing people's engagement about vaccines. The identified defining attributes of vaccine literacy include 'health literacy', 'disease prevention', 'education', and 'immunization'. Vaccine literacy is considered relevant in the nursing practice as knowledge on vaccine literacy easily advances nurses' practice roles through vaccination education, creating developmental policies about vaccines, and prescribing immunization to patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Vaccination
13.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(3)2022 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742744

ABSTRACT

Understanding vaccine hesitancy, considering the target region and phase, is an urgent issue to quell the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. This study aimed to monitor COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in the Japanese population during the three phases of vaccine approval and introduction, and evaluate the association of vaccine hesitancy with vaccine confidence and literacy. We conducted web-based cross-sectional surveys during the three phases of COVID-19 vaccine introduction: January 2021, before approval; June, start of vaccination of the elderly; and September, when about 70% of the target population was vaccinated with at least one dose. There were 7210 participants, aged 20-80 years. We evaluated the association of vaccine hesitancy with vaccine confidence and literacy in the three phases using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The proportion of hesitancy in January, June, and September was 17.5%, 65.3%, and 19.4%, respectively. In any phase, lower vaccine confidence and literacy showed a higher adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of vaccine hesitancy in most items (AOR > 1, p < 0.001). Vaccine hesitancy in June had a different trend in perception of COVID-19 compared to that in the January and September surveys. The findings suggested that hesitancy increases transiently during vaccination introduction phases, and changes as the vaccination program progressed or waves of epidemic. Careful risk communication to increase vaccine confidence and literacy is essential to reduce vaccine hesitancy, especially in the introduction phase.

14.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-16, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653782

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 related infodemic is a threat to the successful COVID-19 vaccination campaigns. This might be especially apparent for patients with autoimmune diseases since there is no data available about the balance between benefits and risks of the newly developed COVID-19 vaccines in this population. We aim (i) to evaluate vaccine literacy skills in a population of patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, (ii) to examine the potential associations between vaccine literacy skills and sociodemographic characteristics and (iii) to analyze the relationships between attitudes, perceptions and beliefs about current vaccinations and vaccine literacy skills and sociodemographic characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 319 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases (92% females; 49.5% of patients in the 31-50 years age category). The vaccine literacy levels were determined using the Health Literacy about Vaccination in adulthood in Italian (HLVa-IT). Sociodemographic characteristics including gender, age, country and area of residence, civil status, socioeconomic status, educational attainment and occupational status were evaluated. The mean vaccine literacy functional and interactive-critical scores were 2.59 ± 0.74 and 3.07 ± 0.60, respectively. The vaccine literacy interactive-critical score was higher in females than in males (p = 0.048). Interactive-critical scores were associated with the area of residence, civil status and socioeconomic status, with the highest score in urban area of ≥ 100.000 inhabitants (p = 0.045), in widow patients (p = 0.023) and in patients with high socioeconomic status (p = 0.018). Significant differences were observed between the different education levels, for both the functional and the interactive-critical scores (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively), the highest score was observed in patients who completed a university degree. The level of vaccine literacy for functional and interactive-critical scales were medium. Area of residence, civil status and socioeconomic status represented determinants of vaccine literacy interactive-critical scale. Educational attainment also contributes to vaccine literacy functional scale. Insight into these factors is required to ensure an optimal vaccine literacy level in patients with autoimmune diseases. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12144-022-02713-y.

15.
Iranian South Medical Journal ; 24(6):597-609, 2022.
Article in Persian | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1628311

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccination is preventive behavior, and vaccine literacy and hesitancy appear to influence vaccination. The aim of this study was to determine the role of vaccine literacy and hesitancy on the acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 2185 residents over 18 years old in urban and rural health centers in three cities of Dashtestan, Dashti, and Kangan were selected through multi-stage sampling and studied online in 2021. The questionnaire included five sections of demographic factors, the questionnaire of vaccine hesitancy, and literacy, attitudes toward the vaccine, and vaccine acceptance. Data were analyzed in SPSS software version 22. Results: The participants' mean age was 34.1 ±11.01 years. Out of 2185 participants in the study, 1417 (64.6%) wanted to receive the vaccine. The mean and standard deviation of functional and critical literacy were 11.2±3.08 and 24.81±5.2, respectively. The mean and standard deviation of the vaccine hesitancy was 14.9±4.2. The results of the study showed that most of the vaccine recipients were men (P= 0.013), people with higher education (P=0.009), and divorced or single individuals (P=0.044). Age was significantly related to vaccine acceptance (P<0.001). Critical literacy, attitude toward vaccines, and vaccine hesitancy were significantly related to vaccine acceptance (P<0.001). Based on the logistic regression model, attitude toward the vaccine (P<0.001, Exp(B)=1.095), vaccine hesitancy (P<0.001, Exp(B)=0.846), age (P=0.030, Exp(B)=1.012), and married status (P=0.007) were predictors of vaccine acceptance. Based on married status, married persons had a lower chance of vaccine acceptance than single persons. Conclusion: Based on the results of the study, in order to improve vaccine acceptance, vaccine hesitancy should be alleviated and a positive attitude toward the vaccine should be created, especially in married and young people. In this regard, providing information to increase vaccine literacy will not have much effect on increasing vaccine acceptance. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Iranian South Medical Journal is the property of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

16.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(12)2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606827

ABSTRACT

Various control measures, including vaccination, have been taken to flatten the COVID-19 epidemic curve across the globe. However, in Bangladesh, many young adults, considered the asymptomatic transmitter of the disease, are waiting to get their first shot. Therefore, the potential predictors of the young adults' vaccine uptake intention are significant to ensure their maximum vaccination when available to them. This study examined how vaccine hesitancy, eHealth literacy, and vaccine literacy are associated with young adults' COVID-19 vaccine uptake intention in a lower-middle-income country. A total of 343 young adults participated in the study. Using ordinary least square and probit estimation, we examined the effect of the explanatory variables of interest on vaccine uptake intention. Vaccine hesitancy emerged as the strongest predictor of vaccine uptake intention. eHealth literacy shared a positive association with vaccine uptake intention, while vaccine literacy had no significant association. To make young adults feel more confident about the vaccine, transmitting the latest vaccine safety updates through authentic channels is essential. The government can aim to enhance the eHealth literacy of young adults as an increased level of eHealth literacy will enable young adults to extract reliable health-related information more efficiently than ever.

17.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(12)2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604985

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is currently the most effective strategy for combating COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines were introduced to the adult population in Israel in early December 2020 and have been available for children aged 12-15 since June 2021. Our study aimed at assessing the influence of vaccine literacy, perception, hesitancy, and behavior on Israeli parents' intentions to have their children vaccinated. Using an anonymous online questionnaire, we recruited 520 parents; 70.4% of the parents indicated that they would get their children vaccinated. The participants' COVID-19 vaccination status was the only socio-demographic factor significantly associated with COVID-19 vaccination acceptability (OR = 32.89; 95%CI = [13.11, 82.54]). The most common sources of information regarding the COVID-19 vaccine were health-care providers and the Internet. Parents who intend to vaccinate their children had higher mean levels of vaccine literacy (2.99 ± 0.47 vs. 3.07 ± 0.44 respectively, p = 0.06), more positive perception of the vaccine (mean scores of 2.26 ± 0.75 vs. 3.44 ± 0.68 respectively, p < 0.001), and lower perceived vaccine hesitancy (7.53 ± 2.37 vs. 4.68 ± 2.71 respectively, p < 0.001) than parents who do not intend to do so. Vaccine behavior was measured using the 5C model of psychological antecedents. All 5C components were significantly correlated with parents' willingness to vaccinate their children. Understanding of parents' willingness to have their children receive the COVID-19 vaccine and the barriers to and facilitators of the vaccination is crucial, as vaccination of children aged 5-11 has recently been approved by the FDA. Providing the population with reliable information regarding the COVID-19 vaccine is an important measure in the attempt to increase COVID-19 vaccine acceptance.

18.
Pacific Rim International Journal of Nursing Research ; 26(1):179-190, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1576421

ABSTRACT

Vaccine literacy is positively associated with vaccination, so assessment of COVID-19 vaccine literacy is essentially needed. I his study translated the COVID-19 Vaccine Literacy Scale, English version into Thai, and tested the psychometric properties of the Thai version (Thai COVID-19 VL Scale). A cross-sectional survey was conducted online. Data comprising 1,002 participants aged 18 years or older were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis to identify factor structure and construct validity of the Thai COVID-19 VL Scale. Also, construct validity using the known-groups technique and internal consistency reliability were employed to test the scale. According to the exploratory factor analysis, the results revealed that the 12-item scale consisting of two factors, Interactive/critical vaccine literacy and Functional vaccine literacy explained 58.1% of the total variance. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the measurement model had relatively goodness of fit with the data. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.81 for the overall scale, 0.85 and 0.86 for both subscales, respectively. By using a known-groups technique, it was revealed that the participants who were vaccinated against COVID-19 had significantly higher vaccine literacy scores than those who intended and who were not sure/ not willing to get vaccination. This study indicated that the Thai COVID-19 VL Scale has adequate validity and reliability for assessing vaccine literacy among Thai people. It has the potential for nurses to identify people with low vaccine literacy so that a public health intervention can be targeted more specifically to enhance vaccine literacy and increase vaccine uptake in Thailand.

19.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(1)2021 Dec 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580354

ABSTRACT

Vaccine uptake in younger Australian women living in rural and regional communities is poorly understood. This research explored factors affecting their decision making in the context of social determinants of health. A mixed methods design applying an explanatory sequential approach commenced with an online questionnaire followed by in-depth interviews with a sample of the same participants. The majority (56%) of participants indicated a positive intention to be vaccinated against COVID-19, but a substantially high proportion (44%) were uncertain or had no intention to be vaccinated. Significant factors affecting vaccine uptake included inadequate and sometimes misleading information leading to poor perceptions of vaccine safety. The personal benefits of vaccination-such as reduced social restrictions and increased mobility-were perceived more positively than health benefits. Additionally, access issues created a structural barrier affecting uptake among those with positive or uncertain vaccination intentions. Understanding factors affecting vaccine uptake allows for more targeted, equitable and effective vaccination campaigns, essential given the importance of widespread COVID-19 vaccination coverage for public health. The population insights emerging from the study hold lessons and relevance for rural and female populations globally.

20.
J Multidiscip Healthc ; 14: 3309-3319, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560922

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to increased exposure risk and the potential impact of COVID-19 infection, health care professionals (HCP) are a target group for COVID-19 vaccination. This study aimed to examine the acceptability of COVID-19 vaccines among HCP at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Barbados. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of HCP was conducted between February 14 and 27, 2021 using an online questionnaire. The questionnaire included demographic information, knowledge of novel coronavirus, intention to accept the COVID-19 vaccination, vaccine literacy (VL), and perceptions and attitudes regarding COVID-19 vaccines. Mean VL scores were calculated. The relationship between socio-demographic variables and vaccine intent was assessed using a multivariable logistic regression model. RESULTS: Of 343 HCPs, 55.1% indicated they would accept the COVID-19 vaccine if it were available; 44.9% expressed hesitancy towards the COVID-19 vaccine. We assessed the impact of socio-demographic factors and previous vaccine behavior on vaccine intent; after adjustment of the multivariable logistic regression model, non-Barbadian nationality and previous flu vaccine uptake were statistically significant predictors of reported intent to take the COVID-19 vaccine. Persons who indicated that they would take the vaccine had a higher mean vaccine literacy score [3.46 95% CI (3.40, 3.52)] than those who were not ready to take the vaccine immediately [3.23 95% CI (3.15, 3.30)]. VL scores were higher among the 29.5% of HCPs who believed vaccines should be mandatory. CONCLUSION: This study highlighted vaccine hesitancy among HCPs in the sole public tertiary hospital of Barbados. As HCP perceptions may help or hinder the campaign to promote vaccine uptake in Barbados, vaccine promotion programs targeting HCPs are needed to ensure the success of the country's COVID-19 vaccination drive.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL