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1.
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci ; 29: e173, 2020 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2016492

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The United Nations warned of COVID-19-related mental health crisis; however, it is unknown whether there is an increase in the prevalence of mental disorders as existing studies lack a reliable baseline analysis or they did not use a diagnostic measure. We aimed to analyse trends in the prevalence of mental disorders prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We analysed data from repeated cross-sectional surveys on a representative sample of non-institutionalised Czech adults (18+ years) from both November 2017 (n = 3306; 54% females) and May 2020 (n = 3021; 52% females). We used Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) as the main screening instrument. We calculated descriptive statistics and compared the prevalence of current mood and anxiety disorders, suicide risk and alcohol-related disorders at baseline and right after the first peak of COVID-19 when related lockdown was still in place in CZ. In addition, using logistic regression, we assessed the association between COVID-19-related worries and the presence of mental disorders. RESULTS: The prevalence of those experiencing symptoms of at least one current mental disorder rose from a baseline of 20.02 (95% CI = 18.64; 21.39) in 2017 to 29.63 (95% CI = 27.9; 31.37) in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. The prevalence of both major depressive disorder (3.96, 95% CI = 3.28; 4.62 v. 11.77, 95% CI = 10.56; 12.99); and suicide risk (3.88, 95% CI = 3.21; 4.52 v. 11.88, 95% CI = 10.64; 13.07) tripled and current anxiety disorders almost doubled (7.79, 95% CI = 6.87; 8.7 v. 12.84, 95% CI = 11.6; 14.05). The prevalence of alcohol use disorders in 2020 was approximately the same as in 2017 (10.84, 95% CI = 9.78; 11.89 v. 9.88, 95% CI = 8.74; 10.98); however, there was a significant increase in weekly binge drinking behaviours (4.07% v. 6.39%). Strong worries about both, health or economic consequences of COVID-19, were associated with an increased odds of having a mental disorder (1.63, 95% CI = 1.4; 1.89 and 1.42, 95% CI = 1.23; 1.63 respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence matching concerns that COVID-19-related mental health problems pose a major threat to populations, particularly considering the barriers in service provision posed during lockdown. This finding emphasises an urgent need to scale up mental health promotion and prevention globally.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Alcohol-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Alcohol-Related Disorders/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Czech Republic/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/etiology , Middle Aged , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Mood Disorders/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Obes Facts ; 15(4): 528-539, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1840683

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic led to a lockdown period. Confinement periods have been related to unhealthy lifestyle behaviors. Our study aimed to determine weight change, changes in eating and exercise habits, the presence of depression and anxiety, and diabetes mellitus (DM) status in a cohort of patients with obesity. METHODS: The study was undertaken in nine centers of Collaborative Obesity Management (COM) of the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO) in Turkey. An e-survey about weight change, eating habits, physical activity status, DM status, depression, and anxiety was completed by patients. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) score was used to determine physical activity in terms of metabolic equivalents (METs). A healthy nutrition coefficient was calculated from the different categories of food consumption. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and General Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) Questionnaire  were used for determining depression and anxiety, respectively. RESULTS: Four hundred twenty-two patients (age 45 ± 12.7 years, W/M = 350/72) were included. The healthy nutrition coefficient before the pandemic was 38.9 ± 6.2 and decreased to 38.1 ± 6.4 during the pandemic (p < 0.001). Two hundred twenty-nine (54.8%) patients gained weight, 54 (12.9%) were weight neutral, and 135 (32.3%) lost weight. Patients in the weight loss group had higher MET scores and higher healthy nutrition coefficients compared with the weight gain and weight-neutral groups (p < 0.001). The PHQ and GAD scores were not different between the groups. Percent weight loss was related to healthy nutrition coefficient (CI: 0.884 [0.821-0.951], p = 0.001) and MET categories (CI: 0.408 [0.222-0.748], p = 0.004). One hundred seventy patients had DM. Considering glycemic control, only 12 (8.4%) had fasting blood glucose <100 mg/dL and 36 (25.2%) had postprandial BG <160 mg/dL. When patients with and without DM were compared in terms of dietary compliance, MET category, weight loss status, PHQ-9 scores, and GAD-7 scores, only MET categories were different; 29 (11.7%) of patients in the nondiabetic group were in the highly active group compared with 5 (2.9%) in the diabetic group. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 lockdown resulted in weight gain in about half of our patients, which was related to changes in physical activity and eating habits. Patients with DM who had moderate glycemic control were similar to the general population in terms of weight loss but were less active.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Humans , Life Style , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Weight Gain , Weight Loss
3.
Lancet ; 399(10324): 518, 2022 02 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665568
4.
Hisp Health Care Int ; 19(4): 230-238, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473601

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the current study was to determine the influence of moral injury and Light Triad (LT) personality traits on anxiety and depression symptoms of health-care personnel during the coronavirus-2019 pandemic. A quantitative, cross-sectional research design was used, the study included a sample of 169 health-care workers from Honduras. Data was gathered through the Moral Injury Symptom Scale for Health Professionals (MISS-HP), Light Triad Scale (LTS), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, and the Patient-Health Questionnaire-9. Results suggest that almost 9 out of 10 respondents experienced at least one potentially morally injurious event, 45.6% were at significant risk of impairment related to moral injury. Working with limited staff and resources, and the implications of it, was the most common potentially morally injurious situation reported by the respondents. Results suggest that MISS-HP Mistrust has significant negative correlations with LT traits. A hierarchical regression model determined that Moral Injury, but not LT traits, significantly affected depression symptoms. On the other hand, anxiety symptoms were significantly predicted by Moral Injury, as did LTS-Humanism. The results were discussed according to their implications for public health policy in Latin America.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Health Personnel , Honduras/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(25): e168, 2021 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389140

ABSTRACT

This study explored the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the Stress and Anxiety to Viral Epidemics-6 items (SAVE-6) scale for assessing people's anxiety in response to the viral epidemic in Lebanon. The 406 participants responded voluntarily to the online survey that included the SAVE-6, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) tools. The single-structure SAVE-6 model showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.773). The SAVE-6 scale also showed good convergent validity with the GAD-7 (Spearman's ρ = 0.42, P < 0.001) and PHQ-9 (ρ = 0.38, P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed an Arabic SAVE-6 cut-off score of 12 points (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.753; sensitivity = 62.74%; specificity = 78.26%) for an at least mild degree of anxiety (GAD-7 score ≥ 5). The Arabic version of the SAVE-6 was a reliable, valid, and solely usable scale for measuring the anxiety response of the general population to the viral epidemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/etiology , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Female , Humans , Lebanon/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychometrics , Quarantine/psychology , ROC Curve , Reproducibility of Results , Sensitivity and Specificity , Surveys and Questionnaires , Translations , Young Adult
6.
Malawi Med J ; 33(1): 54-58, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369850

ABSTRACT

Background: Several studies have been published on the topic of COVID-19 and pregnancy over recent months. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of this pandemic on maternal mental health, particularly in low-resource settings. Aim: To determine the prevalence and predictors of COVID-19-related depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among pregnant women. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that involved 456 pregnant women attending prenatal care at Abakaliki, Nigeria, during the COVID-19 lockdown. These patients were screened for psychological morbidities using the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21). Results: Severe and extremely severe depression were reported in 7.2% (n=33) and 6.4% (n=29) of participants, respectively. Analysis also revealed that 3.3% (n=15) and 7.7% (n=35) of women had severe and extremely severe anxiety, respectively. In total, 23% (n=105) of the participating women had severe stress while 16.7% (n=76) reported extremely severe stress. Multiparity (2-4) and occupation, such as trading and farming, were predictors of depression whereas grand-multiparity, urban residence, and trading, were identified as predictors of anxiety and stress. Conclusion: Symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress were relatively common among pregnant women during the COVID-19 lockdown in Abakaliki, Nigeria. There is a clear need to integrate screening for depression, anxiety and stress, in existing antenatal care programs so as to identify and prevent long-term adverse psychological outcomes related to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Maternal Health , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Quarantine , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Nigeria/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Prevalence , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology
7.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102245, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356197

ABSTRACT

AIMS: It is important to have valid and reliable measures to determine the psychological impact of COVID-19 in patients with diabetes; however, few instruments have been developed and validated for this population. Therefore, the aim of this study was to validate the Scale of Worry for Contagion of COVID-19 (PRE-COVID-19) in a sample of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 219 patients (66.2% female, mean age 58.5 SD = 18.2) participated, selected through non-probabilistic sampling. The PRE-COVID-19 and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale-2 were applied. Reliability analysis was performed for internal consistency, structural equation modeling and item response theory modeling. RESULTS: The results show that a unidimensional 5-item model presents satisfactory goodness-of-fit indices and excellent reliability values. Likewise, convergent validity between the PRE-COVID-19 and a measure of anxiety is evident. All items present adequate discrimination parameters, allowing for discerning between those patients with critical concern about COVID-19 contagion from those with severe concern. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that the PRE-COVID-19 is an instrument with adequate psychometric properties to measure concern about COVID-19 infection and the emotional impact in patients with DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/psychology , Psychometrics/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cuba/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psychometrics/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
8.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(7): 491-496, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334305

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 epidemic has both physical and psychosocial consequences for the general population. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and social dysfunction during the COVID-19 epidemic in Iran. This cross-sectional web-based study was conducted on 1000 Rafsanjani citizens in southeastern Iran. Data were collected by using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 and the General Health Questionnaire from March 15 to March 30, 2020. The prevalence of GAD was 27.8%. The mean score of social functioning was 9.71 ± 2.66, and all participants had social dysfunction. Multivariate logistic regression test showed a significant correlation between anxiety and social functioning (confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.30; p < 0.001), sex (CI, 1.49-3.04; p < 0.001), and concern about COVID-19 (CI, 1.38-2.73; p < 0.001). The COVID-19 epidemic had negative psychosocial consequences in the general population in Iran.


Subject(s)
Anomie , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/ethnology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Health Questionnaire , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Young Adult
9.
Neuroimage ; 239: 118311, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284405

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak introduced unprecedented health-risks, as well as pressure on the economy, society, and psychological well-being due to the response to the outbreak. In a preregistered study, we hypothesized that the intense experience of the outbreak potentially induced stress-related brain modifications in the healthy population, not infected with the virus. We examined volumetric changes in 50 participants who underwent MRI scans before and after the COVID-19 outbreak and lockdown in Israel. Their scans were compared with those of 50 control participants who were scanned twice prior to the pandemic. Following COVID-19 outbreak and lockdown, the test group participants uniquely showed volumetric increases in bilateral amygdalae, putamen, and the anterior temporal cortices. Changes in the amygdalae diminished as time elapsed from lockdown relief, suggesting that the intense experience associated with the pandemic induced transient volumetric changes in brain regions commonly associated with stress and anxiety. The current work utilizes a rare opportunity for real-life natural experiment, showing evidence for brain plasticity following the COVID-19 global pandemic. These findings have broad implications, relevant both for the scientific community as well as the general public.


Subject(s)
Brain/anatomy & histology , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neuroimaging , Quarantine , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , Female , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Male , Organ Size , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Young Adult
11.
Global Health ; 17(1): 32, 2021 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158212

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The recent outbreak of COVID-19 has impacted adversely upon the mental health of millions of people worldwide. Impacts on the mental health conditions and the associated predictors relating to adults in Pakistan, the fifth most populous country in the world, during the COVID-19 remain understudied. Our aim was to investigate distress, anxiety, and overall mental health and their associated predictors among Pakistani adults in this pandemic. We specifically examine mental health issues based on the distance from the epicenter, (a predictor that has revealed opposing evidence in other countries) based on the theories of typhoon eye effect and ripple effect. The sample consisted of 601 adults who were surveyed online about 2.5 months into the outbreak across Pakistan with varying distances from the epicenter of COVID-19 of Karachi. RESULTS: The results showed that 9.2 and 19.0% of the participants surpassed the cut-off criteria for distress and anxiety disorders, respectively. Overall, the distance from the epicenter positively predicted the mental health of adults in Pakistan, and family size negatively moderated this effect. The distance from the epicenter negatively predicted distress and anxiety disorders for adults in large families, which are quite common in Pakistan. CONCLUSION: The evidence of the study interestingly finds that the prediction of the mental health of people by their distance from the epicenter depends on family size. The evidence of this study can help to provide initial indicators for mental health care providers to screen vulnerable groups in Pakistan, a populous country that continues struggling to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Family Characteristics , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Aged , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , Cyclonic Storms , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Spatial Analysis , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248684, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145484

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has been creating a panic and distressing situations among the entire population globally including Nepal. No study has been conducted assessing the psychological impact of this pandemic on the general public in Nepal. The objective of this study is to assess the mental health status during COVID-19 outbreak and explore the potential influencing factors among the population attending the hospital fever clinics with COVID-19 symptoms. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted between May-June, 2020 with a sample of 645 participants aged 18 and above in 26 hospitals across Nepal. Telephone interviews were conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire along with a validated psychometric tool, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress (DASS-21) scale. The metrics and scores of symptoms and their severity were created and analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association of potential covariates with outcome variables. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety, depression and stress were 14%, 7% and 5% respectively. In reference to Karnali, participants from Bagmati province reported higher level of anxiety (OR 3.44, 95% CI 1.31-9.06), while stress (OR 4.27, 95% CI 1.09-18.32) and depressive symptoms (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.05-9.23) observed higher among the participants in Province 1. Women were more at risk of anxiety (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.83-6.36) than men. Similarly, people currently living in rented houses reported more stress (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.05-8.43) and those living far from family reported higher rates of depressive symptoms (OR 3.44, 95% CI 1.03-11.46). CONCLUSION: The study identified increased prevalence of stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms during the initial stage of COVID-19 pandemic in Nepal. Considering the findings, there is urgent need to develop and implement appropriate community-based mental health programs targeting individuals who have had COVID-19 symptoms and who are prone to develop adverse mental health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Mental Health , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nepal/epidemiology , Odds Ratio , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
Ortop Traumatol Rehabil ; 22(5): 303-309, 2020 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079801

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Working during the coronavirus pandemic has had a significant impact on health care workers. A group of orthopaedic trainees at Royal Gwent Hospital, UK, were redeployed to intensive therapy unit for four weeks during COVID-19 pandemic. This study reviews our experience; focusing on causes of stress and anxiety, and how they were managed. The lessons learnt could be used as a framework for pre-emptive me-asures during future challenges. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Orthopaedic registrars were divided into two groups. Seven trainees (Redeployed group) moved to ITU for four weeks to support the critical care team. The other group (Retained group) of eight registrars continued to cover orthopaedic rota. A survey was done for anxiety levels comparing the two groups at three time points during these four weeks. RESULTS: Anxiety and stress in the ITU-redeployed group was comparatively less than the continuing group as time progressed during the redeployment. CONCLUSIONS: 1. The disruptive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has been a source of massive stress and an-xiety for health care workers. 2. Our experience shows that stress is controllable with the correct strategies. 3. The main points are early identification of vulnerable groups, proper induction, active involvement, adequate explanation, appreciation, good communication, and available psychological support whenever needed. 4. These are essential to maintain a resilient workforce against upcoming waves of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Critical Care/psychology , Depressive Disorder/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Orthopedic Nursing/organization & administration , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Depressive Disorder/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , Young Adult
15.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S43-S52, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065048

ABSTRACT

The psychological effects of isolation have already been described in the literature (polar expeditions, submarines, prison). Nevertheless, the scale of confinement implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented. In addition to reviewing the published studies, we need to anticipate the psychological problems that could arise during or at a distance from confinement. We have gone beyond the COVID-19 literature in order to examine the implications of the known consequences of confinement, like boredom, social isolation, stress, or sleep deprivation. Anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, suicidal or addictive behaviours, domestic violence are described effects of confinement, but the mechanisms of emergence of these disorders and their interrelationships remain to be studied. For example, what are the mechanisms of emergence of post-traumatic stress disorders in the context of confinement? We also remind the reader of points of vigilance to be kept in mind with regard to eating disorders and hallucinations. Hallucinations are curiously ignored in the literature on confinement, whereas a vast literature links social isolation and hallucinations. Due to the broad psychopathological consequences, we have to look for these various symptoms to manage them. We quickly summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches already in place, such as telemedicine, which is undergoing rapid development during the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Patient Isolation/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Behavior, Addictive/etiology , Behavior, Addictive/psychology , Boredom , COVID-19 , Child , Child Abuse , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Delivery of Health Care , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Domestic Violence/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/etiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , France , Hallucinations/etiology , Hallucinations/psychology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Suicide/psychology , Telemedicine
18.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 57: 102563, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1051426

ABSTRACT

Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 are at risk of developing many neuropsychiatric disorders, due to the effects of the disease on the brain and the psychosocial pressures of having the disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of patients who were hospitalized with a diagnosis of COVID-19, who underwent psychiatric consultations. The medical records of 892 patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 and the 89 among them who requested psychiatric consultations were analyzed retrospectively. After the psychiatric consultations, patients were most frequently diagnosed with delirium (38.2 %), adjustment disorder (27.0 %), depressive disorder (19.1 %) and anxiety disorder (11.2 %). Patients with delirium had longer hospital stays (p < 0.001), were transferred more frequently to intensive care units (p < 0.001), and had higher mortality rates during their hospital stays (p < 0.001), than all other patients. The need for oxygen (p < 0.001) and mechanical ventilation (p < 0.001) was also significantly higher in delirium patients, as well as in patients who received other psychiatric diagnoses. Neuropsychiatric disorders develop in patients receiving inpatient treatments in COVID-19 wards, and these disorders negatively affect the prognosis of COVID-19. Our findings suggest that the presence of neuropsychiatric disorders in in-patients with COVID-19 might be associated with the negative outcomes of the disease.


Subject(s)
Adjustment Disorders/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Delirium/etiology , Depressive Disorder/etiology , Adjustment Disorders/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Delirium/diagnosis , Depressive Disorder/diagnosis , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Middle Aged , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
19.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(1)2021 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044505

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There are multiple studies indicating that the Indian expat population working in the Middle East is at a significantly high risk for developing anxiety, depression, and suicidal thoughts. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic can precipitate or exacerbate psychological distress among the expat population. The objective of this study was to evaluate psychological distress and coping mechanisms among Indian expats working in the Middle East during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online survey was conducted with a semistructured questionnaire using a nonprobability snowball sampling technique. In addition to demographic data, a list of COVID-19 pandemic-related questions, the Brief COPE, the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-7) were also utilized. RESULTS: A total of 94 responses were received. Of the respondents, 52% reported clinically significant anxiety levels, and 41% reported clinically significant depression levels. Both the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores were significantly associated with the level of concern with air traffic restriction (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that governments of both Indian and Middle Eastern countries should pay more attention to the mental health of the expat population while combating COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety Disorders/ethnology , COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder/ethnology , Psychological Distress , Stress, Psychological/ethnology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/etiology , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , India/ethnology , Male , Middle Aged , Middle East/ethnology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Young Adult
20.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0245864, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1042710

ABSTRACT

The worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and insomnia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) has been a concern during the COVID-19 pandemic, because most people worked in self-isolation for fear of infection. We aimed to clarify the impact of social restrictions imposed due to the COVID-19 pandemic on neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD patients and to identify risk factors associated with these symptoms. A cross-sectional, hospital-based survey was conducted from April 22, 2020 to May 15, 2020. PD patients and their family members were asked to complete paper-based questionnaires about neuropsychiatric symptoms by mail. PD patients were evaluated for motor symptoms using MDS-UPDRS part 2 by telephone interview. A total of 71 responders (39 PD patients and 32 controls) completed the study. Although there was no difference in the age distribution, the rate of females was significantly lower in PD patients (35%) than controls (84%) (P < 0.001). Participants with clinical depression (PHQ-9 score ≥ 10) were more common in PD patients (39%) than controls (6%) (P = 0.002). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that an MDS-UPDRS part 2 score was correlated with the presence of clinical depression (PHQ-9 score ≥ 10) and clinical anxiety (GAD-7 score ≥ 7) (clinical depression: OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.04-1.66; P = 0.025; clinical anxiety: OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.07-1.72; P = 0.013). In the presence of social restrictions, more attention needs to be paid to the neuropsychiatric complications of PD patients, especially those with more severe motor symptoms.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/etiology , Parkinson Disease/complications , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Risk Factors
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