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1.
Lancet ; 398(10303): 843-855, 2021 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A previous efficacy trial found benefit from inhaled budesonide for COVID-19 in patients not admitted to hospital, but effectiveness in high-risk individuals is unknown. We aimed to establish whether inhaled budesonide reduces time to recovery and COVID-19-related hospital admissions or deaths among people at high risk of complications in the community. METHODS: PRINCIPLE is a multicentre, open-label, multi-arm, randomised, controlled, adaptive platform trial done remotely from a central trial site and at primary care centres in the UK. Eligible participants were aged 65 years or older or 50 years or older with comorbidities, and unwell for up to 14 days with suspected COVID-19 but not admitted to hospital. Participants were randomly assigned to usual care, usual care plus inhaled budesonide (800 µg twice daily for 14 days), or usual care plus other interventions, and followed up for 28 days. Participants were aware of group assignment. The coprimary endpoints are time to first self-reported recovery and hospital admission or death related to COVID-19, within 28 days, analysed using Bayesian models. The primary analysis population included all eligible SARS-CoV-2-positive participants randomly assigned to budesonide, usual care, and other interventions, from the start of the platform trial until the budesonide group was closed. This trial is registered at the ISRCTN registry (ISRCTN86534580) and is ongoing. FINDINGS: The trial began enrolment on April 2, 2020, with randomisation to budesonide from Nov 27, 2020, until March 31, 2021, when the prespecified time to recovery superiority criterion was met. 4700 participants were randomly assigned to budesonide (n=1073), usual care alone (n=1988), or other treatments (n=1639). The primary analysis model includes 2530 SARS-CoV-2-positive participants, with 787 in the budesonide group, 1069 in the usual care group, and 974 receiving other treatments. There was a benefit in time to first self-reported recovery of an estimated 2·94 days (95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI] 1·19 to 5·12) in the budesonide group versus the usual care group (11·8 days [95% BCI 10·0 to 14·1] vs 14·7 days [12·3 to 18·0]; hazard ratio 1·21 [95% BCI 1·08 to 1·36]), with a probability of superiority greater than 0·999, meeting the prespecified superiority threshold of 0·99. For the hospital admission or death outcome, the estimated rate was 6·8% (95% BCI 4·1 to 10·2) in the budesonide group versus 8·8% (5·5 to 12·7) in the usual care group (estimated absolute difference 2·0% [95% BCI -0·2 to 4·5]; odds ratio 0·75 [95% BCI 0·55 to 1·03]), with a probability of superiority 0·963, below the prespecified superiority threshold of 0·975. Two participants in the budesonide group and four in the usual care group had serious adverse events (hospital admissions unrelated to COVID-19). INTERPRETATION: Inhaled budesonide improves time to recovery, with a chance of also reducing hospital admissions or deaths (although our results did not meet the superiority threshold), in people with COVID-19 in the community who are at higher risk of complications. FUNDING: National Institute of Health Research and United Kingdom Research Innovation.


Subject(s)
Budesonide/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Administration, Inhalation , Aged , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
2.
STAR Protoc ; 3(4): 101794, 2022 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106167

ABSTRACT

Discovery of efficacious antiviral agents targeting SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) is of the highest importance to fight against COVID-19. Here, we describe a simple protocol for high-throughput screening of Mpro inhibitors using a robust fluorescence polarization (FP) assay. Candidate Mpro inhibitors from large compound libraries could be rapidly identified by monitoring the change of millipolarization unit value. This affordable FP assay can be modified to screen antiviral agents targeting virus protease. For complete details on the use and execution of this protocol, please refer to Li et al. (2022), Yan et al. (2021), and Yan et al. (2022c).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Nonstructural Proteins , Cysteine Endopeptidases , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Fluorescence Polarization
4.
Top Antivir Med ; 30(3): 490-521, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2101976

ABSTRACT

The 2022 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections provided a rich source of new data and comprehensive reviews on antiviral therapy. For COVID-19, intramuscular sotrovimab was noninferior to intravenous sotrovimab, serostatus did not predict the efficacy of sotrovimab, and molnupiravir appeared safe and modestly effective in decreasing hospitalization rates. Trials from low- and middle-income countries provided data to support transitioning those on first-line therapy with or without virologic suppression and those virologically suppressed on second-line therapy to dolutegravir-based regimens. Additional data supported the use of lenacapavir as a long-acting antiretroviral drug. Data across the United States demonstrate the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the HIV care continuum, although enhanced outreach efforts and decentralization of antiretroviral therapy delivery were associated with improvements in care engagement outcomes. Researchers described potential mechanisms for the emergence of integrase strand transfer inhibitor resistance. Studies on proviral genotyping high-lighted the limitations of its use in predicting clinically significant resistance. Several studies looked at the epidemiology and treatment of hepatitis C and B and the status of current hepatitis C virus elimination efforts. Data presented on HIV, COVID-19, and maternal and pediatric health included 2-year virologic outcome data of very early antiretroviral therapy in potentially reducing the latent HIV reservoir in infants with HIV. Data presented on COVID-19 and HIV therapeutics in children included SARS-CoV-2-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in children younger than 12 years of age, remdesivir in hospitalized infants and children, and long-acting therapies for HIV treatment in children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , HIV-1 , Hepatitis, Viral, Human , Child , Humans , United States/epidemiology , HIV Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Latency , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use
5.
Sheng Wu Yi Xue Gong Cheng Xue Za Zhi ; 39(5): 1005-1014, 2022 Oct 25.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100336

ABSTRACT

We aim to screen out the active components that may have therapeutic effect on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) from the severe and critical cases' prescriptions in the "Coronavirus Disease 2019 Diagnosis and Treatment Plan (Trial Ninth Edition)" issued by the National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China and explain its mechanism through the interactions with proteins. The ETCM database and SwissADME database were used to screen the active components contained in 25 traditional Chinese medicines in 3 prescriptions, and the PDB database was used to obtain the crystal structures of 4 proteins of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Molecular docking was performed using Autodock Vina and molecular dynamics simulations were performed using GROMACS. Binding energy results showed that 44 active ingredients including xambioona, gancaonin L, cynaroside, and baicalin showed good binding affinity with multiple targets of SARS-CoV-2, while molecular dynamics simulations analysis showed that xambioona bound more tightly to the nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV-2 and exerted a potent inhibitory effect. Modern technical methods are used to study the active components of traditional Chinese medicine and show that xambioona is an effective inhibitor of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein, which provides a theoretical basis for the development of new anti-SARS-CoV-2 drugs and their treatment methods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Molecular Docking Simulation , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Nucleocapsid Proteins , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology
6.
Molecules ; 27(21)2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099670

ABSTRACT

Since there is an urgent need for novel treatments to combat the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, in silico molecular docking studies were implemented as an attempt to explore the ability of selected bioactive constituents of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) to act as potent SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) antiviral compounds, aiming to explore their ability to interact with SARS-CoV-2 Spike key therapeutic target protein. Our results suggest that EVOO constituents display substantial capacity for binding and interfering with Spike (S) protein, both wild-type and mutant, via the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of Spike, or other binding targets such as angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) or the RBD-ACE2 protein complex, inhibiting the interaction of the virus with host cells. This in silico study provides useful insights for the understanding of the mechanism of action of the studied compounds at a molecular level. From the present study, it could be suggested that the studied active phytochemicals could potentially inhibit the Spike protein, contributing thus to the understanding of the role that they can play in future drug designing and the development of anti-COVID-19 therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Olive Oil , Molecular Docking Simulation , COVID-19/drug therapy , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Binding Sites , Protein Binding
7.
Molecules ; 27(21)2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099667

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 non-structural protein 13 (nsp13) helicase is an essential enzyme for viral replication and has been identified as an attractive target for the development of new antiviral drugs. In detail, the helicase catalyzes the unwinding of double-stranded DNA or RNA in a 5' to 3' direction and acts in concert with the replication-transcription complex (nsp7/nsp8/nsp12). In this work, bioinformatics and computational tools allowed us to perform a detailed conservation analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 helicase genome and to further predict the druggable enzyme's binding pockets. Thus, a structure-based virtual screening was used to identify valuable compounds that are capable of recognizing multiple nsp13 pockets. Starting from a database of around 4000 drugs already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we chose 14 shared compounds capable of recognizing three out of four sites. Finally, by means of visual inspection analysis and based on their commercial availability, five promising compounds were submitted to in vitro assays. Among them, PF-03715455 was able to block both the unwinding and NTPase activities of nsp13 in a micromolar range.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Drug Repositioning , RNA Helicases/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , DNA Helicases/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology
8.
Molecules ; 27(21)2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099666

ABSTRACT

As a cellular protease, transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) plays roles in various physiological and pathological processes, including cancer and viral entry, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Herein, we conducted expression, mutation, and prognostic analyses for the TMPRSS2 gene in pan-cancers as well as in COVID-19-infected lung tissues. The results indicate that TMPRSS2 expression was highest in prostate cancer. A high expression of TMPRSS2 was significantly associated with a short overall survival in breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA), sarcoma (SARC), and uveal melanoma (UVM), while a low expression of TMPRSS2 was significantly associated with a short overall survival in lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), demonstrating TMPRSS2 roles in cancer patient susceptibility and severity. Additionally, TMPRSS2 expression in COVID-19-infected lung tissues was significantly reduced compared to healthy lung tissues, indicating that a low TMPRSS2 expression may result in COVID-19 severity and death. Importantly, TMPRSS2 mutation frequency was significantly higher in prostate adenocarcinoma (PRAD), and the mutant TMPRSS2 pan-cancer group was significantly associated with long overall, progression-free, disease-specific, and disease-free survival rates compared to the wild-type (WT) TMPRSS2 pan-cancer group, demonstrating loss of functional roles due to mutation. Cancer cell lines were treated with small molecules, including cordycepin (CD), adenosine (AD), thymoquinone (TQ), and TQFL12, to mediate TMPRSS2 expression. Notably, CD, AD, TQ, and TQFL12 inhibited TMPRSS2 expression in cancer cell lines, including the PC3 prostate cancer cell line, implying a therapeutic role for preventing COVID-19 in cancer patients. Together, these findings are the first to demonstrate that small molecules, such as CD, AD, TQ, and TQFL12, inhibit TMPRSS2 expression, providing novel therapeutic strategies for preventing COVID-19 and cancers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Prostatic Neoplasms , Male , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , Prognosis , Adenosine , Mutation , Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Prostatic Neoplasms/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(21)2022 Nov 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099581

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Since a large portion of the world's population is currently unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated and has limited access to approved treatments against COVID-19, there is an urgent need to continue research on treatment options, especially those at low cost and which are immediately available to patients, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Prior in vitro and observational studies have shown that fluoxetine, possibly through its inhibitory effect on the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system, could be a promising antiviral and anti-inflammatory treatment against COVID-19. In this report, we evaluated the potential antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities of fluoxetine in a K18-hACE2 mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and against variants of concern in vitro, i.e., SARS-CoV-2 ancestral strain, Alpha B.1.1.7, Gamma P1, Delta B1.617 and Omicron BA.5. Fluoxetine, administrated after SARS-CoV-2 infection, significantly reduced lung tissue viral titres and expression of several inflammatory markers (i.e., IL-6, TNFα, CCL2 and CXCL10). It also inhibited the replication of all variants of concern in vitro. A modulation of the ceramide system in the lung tissues, as reflected by the increase in the ratio HexCer 16:0/Cer 16:0 in fluoxetine-treated mice, may contribute to explain these effects. Our findings demonstrate the antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties of fluoxetine in a K18-hACE2 mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and its in vitro antiviral activity against variants of concern, establishing fluoxetine as a very promising candidate for the prevention and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Mice , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Ceramides , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disease Models, Animal , Fluoxetine/pharmacology , Fluoxetine/therapeutic use
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(21)2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099579

ABSTRACT

Several human diseases are caused by viruses, including cancer, Type I diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the past, people have suffered greatly from viral diseases such as polio, mumps, measles, dengue fever, SARS, MERS, AIDS, chikungunya fever, encephalitis, and influenza. Recently, COVID-19 has become a pandemic in most parts of the world. Although vaccines are available to fight the infection, their safety and clinical trial data are still questionable. Social distancing, isolation, the use of sanitizer, and personal productive strategies have been implemented to prevent the spread of the virus. Moreover, the search for a potential therapeutic molecule is ongoing. Based on experiences with outbreaks of SARS and MERS, many research studies reveal the potential of medicinal herbs/plants or chemical compounds extracted from them to counteract the effects of these viral diseases. COVID-19's current status includes a decrease in infection rates as a result of large-scale vaccination program implementation by several countries. But it is still very close and needs to boost people's natural immunity in a cost-effective way through phytomedicines because many underdeveloped countries do not have their own vaccination facilities. In this article, phytomedicines as plant parts or plant-derived metabolites that can affect the entry of a virus or its infectiousness inside hosts are described. Finally, it is concluded that the therapeutic potential of medicinal plants must be analyzed and evaluated entirely in the control of COVID-19 in cases of uncontrollable SARS infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Plants, Medicinal , Virus Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2 , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Plants, Medicinal/metabolism
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(21)2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099576

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) induces immune-mediated type 1 interferon (IFN-1) production, the pathophysiology of which involves sterile alpha motif and histidine-aspartate domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) tetramerization and the cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS)-stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling pathway. As a result, type I interferonopathies are exacerbated. Aspirin inhibits cGAS-mediated signaling through cGAS acetylation. Acetylation contributes to cGAS activity control and activates IFN-1 production and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling via STING. Aspirin and dapsone inhibit the activation of both IFN-1 and NF-κB by targeting cGAS. We define these as anticatalytic mechanisms. It is necessary to alleviate the pathologic course and take the lag time of the odds of achieving viral clearance by day 7 to coordinate innate or adaptive immune cell reactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interferon Type I , Humans , COVID-19/drug therapy , Acetylation , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Drug Repositioning , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Nucleotidyltransferases/metabolism , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Aspirin , Immunity, Innate/genetics
12.
Iran J Med Sci ; 47(6): 577-587, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100904

ABSTRACT

Background: Transplanted patients receiving immunosuppressive agents are at a higher risk of Coronavirus-disease-2019 (COVID-19), and their polypharmacy state makes the choice of treatment challenging. This study aimed to assess the drug-related problems (DRP) and clinical pharmacists' interventions to manage transplanted patients and candidates for transplantation with COVID-19. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the COVID-19 intensive care unit of Shiraz Organ Transplantation Center (Iran), from March 2020 to April 2021. Patients were admitted to the COVID-19 intensive care unit based on clinical symptoms or positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The clinical pharmacist reviewed all medications and physicians' orders on a daily basis and evaluated DRPs in accordance with the pharmaceutical care network of Europe (PCNE) classification (V 8.01). The treatment team was informed of the DRPs, and the acceptance or rejection of the intervention was also documented. Data were analyzed using SPSS (Version 25.0). In order to determine the proportion and determinants of drug-related problems, descriptive statistics and logistic regression were applied, respectively. Results: A clinical pharmacist reviewed 631 individuals with 11770 medication orders, and 639 DRPs were found in 69% of them with an average of 1.01±1 per patient. The most commonly reported DRPs were treatment efficacy issues followed by adverse drug reactions (ADRs). A total of 982 interventions were provided at prescriber, patient, and drug levels, of which 801 were accepted, and 659 (82.27%) were fully implemented. Conclusion: There have been considerable drug-related issues in managing transplanted patients with COVID-19. DRPs are more common in people with polypharmacy, more than three comorbidities, and hydroxychloroquine regimens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Iran/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation
13.
Cardiovasc Hematol Disord Drug Targets ; 22(2): 104-117, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hypertension and heart failure are known risk factors for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity and mortality outcomes. Beta-blocker is one of the drugs of choice to treat these conditions. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between preadmission beta-blocker use and COVID-19 outcomes. METHODS: PubMed and Europe PMC were used as the database for our search strategy by using combined keywords related to our aims until December 10th, 2020. All articles related to COVID- 19 and beta-blocker were retrieved. Review Manager 5.4 and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis 3 software were used to perform statistical analysis. RESULTS: A total of 43 studies consisting of 11,388,556 patients were included in our analysis. Our meta-analysis showed that the use of beta-blocker was associated with increased risk of COVID-19 [OR 1.32 (95% CI 1.02 - 1.70), p = 0.03, I2 = 99%, random-effect modelling], clinical progression [OR 1.37 (95% CI 1.01 - 1.88), p = 0.04, I2 = 89%, random-effect modelling], and mortality from COVID-19 [OR 1.64 (95% CI 1.22 - 2.19), p = 0.0009, I2 = 94%, random-effect modelling]. Metaregression showed that the association with mortality outcome were influenced by age (p = 0.018) and hypertension (p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: The risk and benefits of using beta-blocker as a drug of choice to treat hypertensive patients should be considered and reviewed individually, case by case, knowing their association with higher incidence and severity of COVID-19 infections. Other first-line antihypertensive drugs may be considered as an alternative therapy if the risk of administering beta blockers outweighs the benefits of COVID-19 infection. REGISTRATION DETAILS: PROSPERO (CRD42021260455).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Humans , COVID-19/drug therapy , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Hypertension/drug therapy , Adrenergic beta-Antagonists/therapeutic use
14.
Trials ; 23(1): 273, 2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has a heterogeneous outcome in individuals from remaining asymptomatic to death. In a majority of cases, mild symptoms are present that do not require hospitalization and can be successfully treated in the outpatient setting, though symptoms may persist for a long duration. We hypothesize that drugs suitable for decentralized study in outpatients will have efficacy among infected outpatients METHODS: The TREAT NOW platform is designed to accommodate testing multiple agents with the ability to incorporate new agents in the future. TREAT NOW is an adaptive, blinded, multi-center, placebo-controlled superiority randomized clinical trial which started with two active therapies (hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir) and placebo, with the hydroxychloroquine arm dropped shortly after enrollment began due to external evidence. Each arm has a target enrollment of 300 participants who will be randomly assigned in an equal allocation to receive either an active therapy or placebo twice daily for 14 days with daily electronic surveys collected over days 1 through 16 and on day 29 to evaluate symptoms and a modified COVID-19 ordinal outcome scale. Participants are enrolled remotely by telephone and consented with a digital interface, study drug is overnight mailed to study participants, and data collection occurs electronically without in-person interactions. DISCUSSION: If effective treatments for COVID-19 can be identified for individuals in the outpatient setting before they advance to severe disease, it will prevent progression to more severe disease, reduce the need for hospitalization, and shorten the duration of symptoms. The novel decentralized, "no touch" approach used by the TREAT NOW platform has distinction advantages over traditional in-person trials to reach broader populations and perform study procedures in a pragmatic yet rigorous manner. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04372628. Registered on April 30, 2020. First posted on May 4, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Outpatients , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
15.
J Infus Nurs ; 45(6): 299-305, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097523

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic changed home infusion nursing dramatically by increasing demand for home infusion nurses while decreasing their availability. Home infusion of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is an option for treatment of numerous conditions and requires considerable infusion time. Use of a higher-concentration IVIg product and shorter escalation increments may decrease required infusion time. The authors conducted a retrospective database analysis that identified 23 patients receiving IVIg before transitioning to a 10% IVIg product with a 15-minute rate escalation protocol (Gammaplex 10% IVIg) and evaluated the total infusion time before and after the transition. Among the 23 who received IVIg, the mean ± SD IVIg dose per dosing cycle before transitioning was 1.2 ± 0.7 g/kg given in 1 to 5 infusions per cycle. The mean ± SD time per infusion was 2.8 ± 0.8 hours before the transition and 2.6 ± 0.7 hours per infusion after the transition. The infusion time decreased after transition in 13 patients (56.5%), did not change in 5 patients (21.7%), and increased in 5 patients (21.7%). Nurse education on IVIg rate escalation may facilitate faster achievement of the maximum safe infusion rate and reduce infusion times. A trial transition to this 10% IVIg product with a 15-minute rate escalation protocol may also reduce infusion times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous , COVID-19/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , Workforce
19.
SAR QSAR Environ Res ; 33(10): 753-778, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096975

ABSTRACT

Since interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) and its receptor, CXCR1 and CXCR2, were known in the early 1990s, biological pathways related to these proteins were proven to have high clinical value in cancer and inflammatory/autoimmune conditions treatment. Recently, IL-8 has been identified as biomarker for severe COVID-19 patients and COVID-19 prognosis. Boyles et al. (mAbs 12 (2020), pp. 1831880) have published a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the LY3041658 Fab in a complex human CXCL8. They described the ability to bind to IL-8 and the blocking of IL-8/its receptors interaction by the LY3041658 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, the study has been designed to identify potential small molecules inhibiting interleukin-8 by targeting LY3041658/IL-8 complex structure using an in silico approach. A structure­based pharmacophore and molecular docking models of the protein active site cavity were generated to identify possible candidates, followed by virtual screening with the ZINC database. ADME analysis of hit compounds was also conducted. Molecular dynamics simulations were then performed to survey the behaviour and stability of the ligand-protein complexes. Furthermore, the MM/PBSA technique has been utilized to evaluate the free binding energy. The final data confirmed that one newly obtained compound, ZINC21882765, may serve as the best potential inhibitor for IL-8.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interleukin-8 , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship , COVID-19/drug therapy , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Ligands
20.
Semin Neurol ; 42(4): 512-522, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096904

ABSTRACT

Medication overuse headache (MOH), new daily persistent headache (NDPH), and persistent refractory headache attributed to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) infection represent a significant burden in terms of disability and quality of life, and a challenge in terms of definition, pathophysiology, and treatment. Regarding MOH, prevention without withdrawal is not inferior to prevention with withdrawal. Preventive medications like topiramate, onabotulinumtoxinA, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) monoclonal antibodies improve chronic migraine with MOH regardless of withdrawal. The differential diagnosis of NDPH is broad and should be carefully examined. There are no guidelines for the treatment of NDPH, but options include a short course of steroids, nerve blocks, topiramate, nortriptyline, gabapentin, CGRP monoclonal antibodies, and onabotulinumtoxinA. The persistence of headache 3 months after SARS-CoV2 infection is a predictor of poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
Botulinum Toxins, Type A , COVID-19 , Headache Disorders, Secondary , Headache Disorders , Humans , Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide/therapeutic use , Botulinum Toxins, Type A/therapeutic use , Quality of Life , Topiramate/therapeutic use , RNA, Viral/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Headache Disorders, Secondary/diagnosis , Headache Disorders, Secondary/drug therapy , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/drug therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use
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