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2.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 41(11): 1328-1330, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096354

ABSTRACT

Environmental surface testing was performed to search for evidence of severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) environmental contamination by an asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 carrier with persistently high viral loads under isolation. No evidence of environmental contamination was found. Further studies are needed to measure environmental contamination by SARS-CoV-2 carriers and to determine reasonable isolation periods.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Fomites/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Quarantine/methods , Viral Load , Adult , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patients' Rooms , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Quarantine/standards , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Nature ; 586(7831): 776-778, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077076

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first detected in Wuhan in December 2019 and caused coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)1,2. In 2003, the closely related SARS-CoV had been detected in domestic cats and a dog3. However, little is known about the susceptibility of domestic pet mammals to SARS-CoV-2. Here, using PCR with reverse transcription, serology, sequencing the viral genome and virus isolation, we show that 2 out of 15 dogs from households with confirmed human cases of COVID-19 in Hong Kong were found to be infected with SARS-CoV-2. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in five nasal swabs collected over a 13-day period from a 17-year-old neutered male Pomeranian. A 2.5-year-old male German shepherd was positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA on two occasions and virus was isolated from nasal and oral swabs. Antibody responses were detected in both dogs using plaque-reduction-neutralization assays. Viral genetic sequences of viruses from the two dogs were identical to the virus detected in the respective human cases. The dogs remained asymptomatic during quarantine. The evidence suggests that these are instances of human-to-animal transmission of SARS-CoV-2. It is unclear whether infected dogs can transmit the virus to other animals or back to humans.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Dog Diseases/transmission , Dog Diseases/virology , Pandemics/veterinary , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/veterinary , Zoonoses/transmission , Zoonoses/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Dogs , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
4.
Arch Virol ; 167(11): 2249-2262, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075433

ABSTRACT

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is an enteric virus that was first identified in 2012. Although PDCoV has been detected worldwide, there is little information about its circulation in western China. In this study, fecal samples were collected from piglets with watery diarrhea in western China between 2015 and 2018 for the detection of PDCoV. The positive rate was 29.9%. A PDCoV strain (CHN/CQ/BN23/2016, BN23) was isolated and selected for further investigation. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this strain formed an individual cluster between the early Chinese lineage and the Chinese lineage. RDP4 and SimPlot analysis demonstrated that strain BN23 is a recombinant of Thailand/S5015L/2015 and CHN-AH-2004. The pathogenicity of BN23 was evaluated in 3-day-old piglets. Challenged piglets developed serious clinical signs and died at 3 days post-inoculation. Our data show that PDCoV is prevalent in western China and that strain BN23 is highly pathogenic to newborn piglets. Therefore, more attention should be paid to emerging PDCoV strains in western China.


Subject(s)
Deltacoronavirus , Animals , China , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Deltacoronavirus/genetics , Deltacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Deltacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Diarrhea/veterinary , Genomics , Phylogeny , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Virulence
5.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 20(11): e276-e288, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062013

ABSTRACT

As severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 continues to spread worldwide, there have been increasing reports from Europe, North America, Asia, and Latin America describing children and adolescents with COVID-19-associated multisystem inflammatory conditions. However, the association between multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children and COVID-19 is still unknown. We review the epidemiology, causes, clinical features, and current treatment protocols for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children and adolescents associated with COVID-19. We also discuss the possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms for COVID-19-induced inflammatory processes, which can lead to organ damage in paediatric patients who are severely ill. These insights provide evidence for the need to develop a clear case definition and treatment protocol for this new condition and also shed light on future therapeutic interventions and the potential for vaccine development. TRANSLATIONS: For the French, Chinese, Arabic, Spanish and Russian translations of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Adolescent , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/drug therapy , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Young Adult
6.
J Virol ; 96(18): e0102422, 2022 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008764

ABSTRACT

Zoonotic coronaviruses represent an ongoing threat to public health. The classical porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) first appeared in the early 1970s. Since 2010, outbreaks of highly virulent PEDV variants have caused great economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. However, the strategies by which PEDV variants escape host immune responses are not fully understood. Complement component 3 (C3) is considered a central component of the three complement activation pathways and plays a crucial role in preventing viral infection. In this study, we found that C3 significantly inhibited PEDV replication in vitro, and both variant and classical PEDV strains induced high levels of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß) in Huh7 cells. However, the PEDV variant strain reduces C3 transcript and protein levels induced by IL-1ß compared with the PEDV classical strain. Examination of key molecules of the C3 transcriptional signaling pathway revealed that variant PEDV reduced C3 by inhibiting CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein ß (C/EBP-ß) phosphorylation. Mechanistically, PEDV nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1) inhibited C/EBP-ß phosphorylation via amino acid residue 50. Finally, we constructed recombinant PEDVs to verify the critical role of amino acid 50 of NSP1 in the regulation of C3 expression. In summary, we identified a novel antiviral role of C3 in inhibiting PEDV replication and the viral immune evasion strategies of PEDV variants. Our study reveals new information on PEDV-host interactions and furthers our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of this virus. IMPORTANCE The complement system acts as a vital link between the innate and the adaptive immunity and has the ability to recognize and neutralize various pathogens. Activation of the complement system acts as a double-edged sword, as appropriate levels of activation protect against pathogenic infections, but excessive responses can provoke a dramatic inflammatory response and cause tissue damage, leading to pathological processes, which often appear in COVID-19 patients. However, how PEDV, as the most severe coronavirus causing diarrhea in piglets, regulates the complement system has not been previously reported. In this study, for the first time, we identified a novel mechanism of a PEDV variant in the suppression of C3 expression, showing that different coronaviruses and even different subtype strains differ in regulation of C3 expression. In addition, this study provides a deeper understanding of the mechanism of the PEDV variant in immune escape and enhanced virulence.


Subject(s)
Complement C3 , Coronavirus Infections , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus , Swine Diseases , Viral Nonstructural Proteins , Virus Replication , Animals , Antiviral Agents , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line, Tumor , Complement C3/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Swine , Swine Diseases/immunology , Swine Diseases/virology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/physiology
8.
J Virol ; 96(17): e0006522, 2022 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001768

ABSTRACT

Swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV) is a recently emerging bat-borne coronavirus responsible for high mortality rates in piglets. In vitro studies have indicated that SADS-CoV has a wide tissue tropism in different hosts, including humans. However, whether this virus potentially threatens other animals remains unclear. Here, we report the experimental infection of wild-type BALB/c and C57BL/6J suckling mice with SADS-CoV. We found that mice less than 7 days old are susceptible to the virus, which caused notable multitissue infections and damage. The mortality rate was the highest in 2-day-old mice and decreased in older mice. Moreover, a preliminary neuroinflammatory response was observed in 7-day-old SADS-CoV-infected mice. Thus, our results indicate that SADS-CoV has potential pathogenicity in young hosts. IMPORTANCE SADS-CoV, which likely has originated from bat coronaviruses, is highly pathogenic to piglets and poses a threat to the swine industry. Little is known about its potential to disseminate to other animals. No efficient treatment is available, and the quarantine strategy is the only preventive measure. In this study, we demonstrated that SADS-CoV can efficiently replicate in suckling mice younger than 7 days. In contrast to infected piglets, in which intestinal tropism is shown, SADS-CoV caused infection and damage in all murine tissues evaluated in this study. In addition, neuroinflammatory responses were detected in some of the infected mice. Our work provides a preliminary cost-effective model for the screening of antiviral drugs against SADS-CoV infection.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Diarrhea , Mice , Swine Diseases , Alphacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Animals , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diarrhea/complications , Diarrhea/veterinary , Diarrhea/virology , Humans , Mice/virology , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neuroinflammatory Diseases/complications , Neuroinflammatory Diseases/veterinary , Neuroinflammatory Diseases/virology , Swine/virology , Swine Diseases/virology
9.
J Virol ; 96(17): e0074122, 2022 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1992937

ABSTRACT

Within the past 2 decades, three highly pathogenic human coronaviruses have emerged, namely, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The health threats and economic burden posed by these tremendously severe coronaviruses have paved the way for research on their etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment. Compared to SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, MERS-CoV genome encoded fewer accessory proteins, among which the ORF4b protein had anti-immunity ability in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Our work for the first time revealed that ORF4b protein was unstable in the host cells and could be degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system. After extensive screenings, it was found that UBR5 (ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 5), a member of the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligases, specifically regulated the ubiquitination and degradation of ORF4b. Similar to ORF4b, UBR5 can also translocate into the nucleus through its nuclear localization signal, enabling it to regulate ORF4b stability in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Through further experiments, lysine 36 was identified as the ubiquitination site on the ORF4b protein, and this residue was highly conserved in various MERS-CoV strains isolated from different regions. When UBR5 was knocked down, the ability of ORF4b to suppress innate immunity was enhanced and MERS-CoV replication was stronger. As an anti-MERS-CoV host protein, UBR5 targets and degrades ORF4b protein through the ubiquitin proteasome system, thereby attenuating the anti-immunity ability of ORF4b and ultimately inhibiting MERS-CoV immune escape, which is a novel antagonistic mechanism of the host against MERS-CoV infection. IMPORTANCE ORF4b was an accessory protein unique to MERS-CoV and was not present in SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 which can also cause severe respiratory disease. Moreover, ORF4b inhibited the production of antiviral cytokines in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, which was likely to be associated with the high lethality of MERS-CoV. However, whether the host proteins regulate the function of ORF4b is unknown. Our study first determined that UBR5, a host E3 ligase, was a potential host anti-MERS-CoV protein that could reduce the protein level of ORF4b and diminish its anti-immunity ability by inducing ubiquitination and degradation. Based on the discovery of ORF4b-UBR5, a critical molecular target, further increasing the degradation of ORF4b caused by UBR5 could provide a new strategy for the clinical development of drugs for MERS-CoV.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Host Microbial Interactions , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Proteolysis , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases , Ubiquitination , Viral Proteins , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism , Ubiquitins/metabolism , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication
12.
Nature ; 609(7928): 785-792, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972633

ABSTRACT

Highly pathogenic coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (refs. 1,2) (SARS-CoV-2), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus3 (MERS-CoV) and SARS-CoV-1 (ref. 4), vary in their transmissibility and pathogenicity. However, infection by all three viruses results in substantial apoptosis in cell culture5-7 and in patient tissues8-10, suggesting a potential link between apoptosis and pathogenesis of coronaviruses. Here we show that caspase-6, a cysteine-aspartic protease of the apoptosis cascade, serves as an important host factor for efficient coronavirus replication. We demonstrate that caspase-6 cleaves coronavirus nucleocapsid proteins, generating fragments that serve as interferon antagonists, thus facilitating virus replication. Inhibition of caspase-6 substantially attenuates lung pathology and body weight loss in golden Syrian hamsters infected with SARS-CoV-2 and improves the survival of mice expressing human DPP4 that are infected with mouse-adapted MERS-CoV. Our study reveals how coronaviruses exploit a component of the host apoptosis cascade to facilitate virus replication.


Subject(s)
Aspartic Acid , Caspase 6 , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Cysteine , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Virus Replication , Animals , Apoptosis , Aspartic Acid/metabolism , Caspase 6/metabolism , Coronavirus/growth & development , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Cricetinae , Cysteine/metabolism , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/genetics , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Humans , Interferons/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferons/immunology , Lung/pathology , Mesocricetus , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate , Weight Loss
14.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263582, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910522

ABSTRACT

The membrane protein M of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV) is the most abundant component of the viral envelope. The M protein plays a central role in the morphogenesis and assembly of the virus through protein interactions of the M-M, M-Spike (S) and M-nucleocapsid (N) type. The M protein is known to induce protective antibodies in pigs and to participate in the antagonistic response of the cellular antiviral system coordinated by the type I and type III interferon pathways. The 3D structure of the PEDV M protein is still unknown. The present work exposes a predicted 3D model of the M protein generated using the Robetta protocol. The M protein model is organized into a transmembrane and a globular region. The obtained 3D model of the PEDV M protein was compared with 3D models of the SARS-CoV-2 M protein created using neural networks and with initial machine learning-based models created using trRosetta. The 3D model of the present study predicted four linear B-cell epitopes (RSVNASSGTG and KHGDYSAVSNPSALT peptides are noteworthy), six discontinuous B-cell epitopes, forty weak binding and fourteen strong binding T-cell epitopes in the CV777 M protein. A high degree of conservation of the epitopes predicted in the PEDV M protein was observed among different PEDV strains isolated in different countries. The data suggest that the M protein could be a potential candidate for the development of new treatments or strategies that activate protective cellular mechanisms against viral diseases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus M Proteins/chemistry , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/chemistry , Swine Diseases/virology , Swine/virology , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus M Proteins/immunology , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Models, Molecular , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/immunology , Protein Conformation , Swine Diseases/immunology
15.
Nat Med ; 26(6): 842-844, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1900503

ABSTRACT

Respiratory immune characteristics associated with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity are currently unclear. We characterized bronchoalveolar lavage fluid immune cells from patients with varying severity of COVID-19 and from healthy people by using single-cell RNA sequencing. Proinflammatory monocyte-derived macrophages were abundant in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with severe COVID-9. Moderate cases were characterized by the presence of highly clonally expanded CD8+ T cells. This atlas of the bronchoalveolar immune microenvironment suggests potential mechanisms underlying pathogenesis and recovery in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Single-Cell Analysis , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Mol Biol ; 434(6): 167438, 2022 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851578

ABSTRACT

Recognition of viral infections by various pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) activates an inflammatory cytokine response that inhibits viral replication and orchestrates the activation of adaptive immune responses to control the viral infection. The broadly active innate immune response puts a strong selective pressure on viruses and drives the selection of variants with increased capabilities to subvert the induction and function of antiviral cytokines. This revolutionary process dynamically shapes the host ranges, cell tropism and pathogenesis of viruses. Recent studies on the innate immune responses to the infection of human coronaviruses (HCoV), particularly SARS-CoV-2, revealed that HCoV infections can be sensed by endosomal toll-like receptors and/or cytoplasmic RIG-I-like receptors in various cell types. However, the profiles of inflammatory cytokines and transcriptome response induced by a specific HCoV are usually cell type specific and determined by the virus-specific mechanisms of subverting the induction and function of interferons and inflammatory cytokines as well as the genetic trait of the host genes of innate immune pathways. We review herein the recent literatures on the innate immune responses and their roles in the pathogenesis of HCoV infections with emphasis on the pathobiological roles and therapeutic effects of type I interferons in HCoV infections and their antiviral mechanisms. The knowledge on the mechanism of innate immune control of HCoV infections and viral evasions should facilitate the development of therapeutics for induction of immune resolution of HCoV infections and vaccines for efficient control of COVID-19 pandemics and other HCoV infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Drug Development , Immune Evasion , Interferon Type I , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferon Type I/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
17.
Avian Pathol ; 51(4): 339-348, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1830476

ABSTRACT

Infectious bronchitis is an acute and highly contagious disease caused by avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). As well as the typical clinical respiratory signs, such as dyspnoea and tracheal rales, QX genotype strains can also cause damage to the urinary system and reproductive system. Our previous studies found that chickens infected with QX-type IBV also displayed damage to the bursa of Fabricius. To investigate the effects of different genotypes of IBV on the bursa of Fabricius, we challenged one-week-old SPF chickens with Mass, QX and TW genotype IBV strains and compared the clinical signs, gross lesions, histopathological damage, viral loads, and expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-1ß, IFN-α,ß, γ and TNF-α). The results showed that all three strains caused tissue damage, while significant temporal variations in the viral loads of the different infected groups were detected. IBV infection seriously interfered with the natural immune response mediated by inflammatory cytokines (IFN-α, IFN-ß, IL-6 and IFN-γ) in chickens. Our results suggested that IBV has potential immunological implications for chickens that may lead to poor production efficiency. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTSAvian coronavirus IBV is an important pathogen of chickens.IBV has potential immunological implications in chickens.The bursal viral load of different IBV strains varies significantly.


Subject(s)
Bursa of Fabricius , Coronavirus Infections , Infectious bronchitis virus , Poultry Diseases , Animals , Bursa of Fabricius/pathology , Bursa of Fabricius/virology , Chickens , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Infectious bronchitis virus/classification , Infectious bronchitis virus/genetics , Infectious bronchitis virus/pathogenicity , Interleukin-6 , Poultry Diseases/pathology , Poultry Diseases/virology
18.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 28(6): 1705-1711, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826407

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Due to the lack of evidence, it was the aim of the study to investigate current possible cutbacks in orthopaedic healthcare due to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (COVID-19). METHODS: An online survey was performed of orthopaedic surgeons in the German-speaking Arthroscopy Society (Gesellschaft für Arthroskopie und Gelenkchirurgie, AGA). The survey consisted of 20 questions concerning four topics: four questions addressed the origin and surgical experience of the participant, 12 questions dealt with potential cutbacks in orthopaedic healthcare and 4 questions addressed the influence of the pandemic on the particular surgeon. RESULTS: Of 4234 contacted orthopaedic surgeons, 1399 responded. Regarding arthroscopic procedures between 10 and 30% of the participants stated that these were still being performed-with actual percentages depending on the specific joint and procedure. Only 6.2% of the participants stated that elective total joint arthroplasty was still being performed at their centre. In addition, physical rehabilitation and surgeons' postoperative follow-ups were severely affected. CONCLUSION: Orthopaedic healthcare services in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland are suffering a drastic cutback due to COVID-19. A drastic reduction in arthroscopic procedures like rotator cuff repair and cruciate ligament reconstruction and an almost total shutdown of elective total joint arthroplasty were reported. Long-term consequences cannot be predicted yet. The described disruption in orthopaedic healthcare services has to be viewed as historic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: V.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty/statistics & numerical data , Arthroscopy/statistics & numerical data , Austria/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Germany/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Internet , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
19.
J Virol ; 96(1): e0169521, 2022 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1816694

ABSTRACT

The replication of coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and the recently emerged severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is closely associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of infected cells. The unfolded protein response (UPR), which is mediated by ER stress (ERS), is a typical outcome in coronavirus-infected cells and is closely associated with the characteristics of coronaviruses. However, the interaction between virus-induced ERS and coronavirus replication is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that infection with the betacoronavirus porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (PHEV) induced ERS and triggered all three branches of the UPR signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, ERS suppressed PHEV replication in mouse neuro-2a (N2a) cells primarily by activating the protein kinase R-like ER kinase (PERK)-eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) axis of the UPR. Moreover, another eIF2α phosphorylation kinase, interferon (IFN)-induced double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), was also activated and acted cooperatively with PERK to decrease PHEV replication. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the PERK/PKR-eIF2α pathways negatively regulated PHEV replication by attenuating global protein translation. Phosphorylated eIF2α also promoted the formation of stress granules (SGs), which in turn repressed PHEV replication. In summary, our study presents a vital aspect of the host innate response to invading pathogens and reveals attractive host targets (e.g., PERK, PKR, and eIF2α) for antiviral drugs. IMPORTANCE Coronavirus diseases are caused by different coronaviruses of importance in humans and animals, and specific treatments are extremely limited. ERS, which can activate the UPR to modulate viral replication and the host innate response, is a frequent occurrence in coronavirus-infected cells. PHEV, a neurotropic betacoronavirus, causes nerve cell damage, which accounts for the high mortality rates in suckling piglets. However, it remains incompletely understood whether the highly developed ER in nerve cells plays an antiviral role in ERS and how ERS regulates viral proliferation. In this study, we found that PHEV infection induced ERS and activated the UPR both in vitro and in vivo and that the activated PERK/PKR-eIF2α axis inhibited PHEV replication through attenuating global protein translation and promoting SG formation. A better understanding of coronavirus-induced ERS and UPR activation may reveal the pathogenic mechanism of coronavirus and facilitate the development of new treatment strategies for these diseases.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus 1/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2/metabolism , Virus Replication/physiology , eIF-2 Kinase/metabolism , Animals , Betacoronavirus 1/metabolism , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism , Endoplasmic Reticulum/ultrastructure , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Mice , Phosphorylation , Protein Biosynthesis , Signal Transduction , Unfolded Protein Response
20.
J Virol ; 96(9): e0038022, 2022 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794532

ABSTRACT

Crossing the endothelium from the entry site and spreading in the bloodstream are crucial but obscure steps in the pathogenesis of many emerging viruses. Previous studies confirmed that porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) caused intestinal infection by intranasal inoculation. However, the role of the nasal endothelial barrier in PEDV translocation remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that PEDV infection causes nasal endothelial dysfunction to favor viral dissemination. Intranasal inoculation with PEDV compromised the integrity of endothelial cells (ECs) in nasal microvessels. The matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) released from the PEDV-infected nasal epithelial cells (NECs) contributed to the destruction of endothelial integrity by degrading the tight junctions, rather than direct PEDV infection. Moreover, the proinflammatory cytokines released from PEDV-infected NECs activated ECs to upregulate ICAM-1 expression, which favored peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) migration. PEDV could further exploit migrated cells to favor viral dissemination. Together, our results reveal the mechanism by which PEDV manipulates the endothelial dysfunction to favor viral dissemination and provide novel insights into how coronavirus interacts with the endothelium. IMPORTANCE The endothelial barrier is the last but vital defense against systemic viral transmission. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) can cause severe atrophic enteritis and acute viremia. However, the mechanisms by which the virus crosses the endothelial barrier and causes viremia are poorly understood. In this study, we revealed the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in PEDV infection. The viral infection activates NECs and causes the upregulation of MMP-7 and proinflammatory cytokines. Using NECs, ECs, and PBMCs as in vitro models, we determined that the released MMP-7 contributed to the destruction of endothelial barrier, and the released proinflammatory cytokines activated ECs to facilitate PBMCs migration. Moreover, the virus further exploited the migrated cells to promote viral dissemination. Thus, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction induced by coronavirus infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Endothelium , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus , Swine Diseases , Virus Shedding , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines , Endothelium/virology , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/genetics , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Matrix Metalloproteinase 7/metabolism , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/physiology , Swine , Swine Diseases/immunology , Swine Diseases/transmission , Swine Diseases/virology , Viremia
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