Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 208.083
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 13.
Article | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110015

ABSTRACT

Negative psychological effects of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have been identified in adults and children, such as anxiety and sleep disorders. However, research about the impact of this pandemic on children from ethnical minorities is scarce. We tested the effects of COVID-19 outbreak on psychological aspects and daily routines among Arab Israeli Children. An online cross-sectional survey was conducted among Arab Israeli parents, including behavioral and emotional aspects questionnaire and questions addressing using of screens, sleep, and physical activities. The results showed that, during the COVID-19 outbreak, 55.8% of the children asked to sleep in their parents' bed and 45% expressed fears they did not have before. Most of the children showed increased irritability, constant mood swings and nervousness about limits and messages, and 41.4% showed sleep difficulties. Concerning adaptive behaviors, more than 50% of the parents reported that their child became wiser, lazier, and was able to adapt the limits and restriction of the COVID-19 outbreak. Moreover, the children tended to increase their use of screens, used to sleep more time, and were less active physically. The results suggest that children are vulnerable to the COVID-19 outbreak psychological effects and highlight the need to reduce the psychological burden of this pandemic and the necessity of immediate intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus , Adult , Arabs , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Diabetes Care ; 44(8): 1788-1796, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109595

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess whether risk of severe outcomes among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) hospitalized for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) differs from that of patients without diabetes or with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using the Premier Healthcare Database Special COVID-19 Release records of patients discharged after COVID-19 hospitalization from U.S. hospitals from March to November 2020 (N = 269,674 after exclusion), we estimated risk differences (RD) and risk ratios (RR) of intensive care unit admission or invasive mechanical ventilation (ICU/MV) and of death among patients with T1DM compared with patients without diabetes or with T2DM. Logistic models were adjusted for age, sex, and race or ethnicity. Models adjusted for additional demographic and clinical characteristics were used to examine whether other factors account for the associations between T1DM and severe COVID-19 outcomes. RESULTS: Compared with patients without diabetes, T1DM was associated with a 21% higher absolute risk of ICU/MV (RD 0.21, 95% CI 0.19-0.24; RR 1.49, 95% CI 1.43-1.56) and a 5% higher absolute risk of mortality (RD 0.05, 95% CI 0.03-0.07; RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.24-1.57), with adjustment for age, sex, and race or ethnicity. Compared with T2DM, T1DM was associated with a 9% higher absolute risk of ICU/MV (RD 0.09, 95% CI 0.07-0.12; RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.12-1.22), but no difference in mortality (RD 0.00, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.02; RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.89-1.13). After adjustment for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurring before or at COVID-19 diagnosis, patients with T1DM no longer had increased risk of ICU/MV (RD 0.01, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.03) and had lower mortality (RD -0.03, 95% CI -0.05 to -0.01) in comparisons with patients with T2DM. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with T1DM hospitalized for COVID-19 are at higher risk for severe outcomes than those without diabetes. Higher risk of ICU/MV in patients with T1DM than in patients with T2DM was largely accounted for by the presence of DKA. These findings might further guide recommendations related to diabetes management and the prevention of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , COVID-19 Testing , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Respiration, Artificial , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
3.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(2): e1008618, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109274

ABSTRACT

For practical reasons, many forecasts of case, hospitalization, and death counts in the context of the current Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are issued in the form of central predictive intervals at various levels. This is also the case for the forecasts collected in the COVID-19 Forecast Hub (https://covid19forecasthub.org/). Forecast evaluation metrics like the logarithmic score, which has been applied in several infectious disease forecasting challenges, are then not available as they require full predictive distributions. This article provides an overview of how established methods for the evaluation of quantile and interval forecasts can be applied to epidemic forecasts in this format. Specifically, we discuss the computation and interpretation of the weighted interval score, which is a proper score that approximates the continuous ranked probability score. It can be interpreted as a generalization of the absolute error to probabilistic forecasts and allows for a decomposition into a measure of sharpness and penalties for over- and underprediction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/virology , Forecasting , Humans , Probability , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
BMC Med Ethics ; 22(1): 143, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108768

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, the urgent need to discover effective therapies for COVID-19 prompted questions about the ethical problem of randomization along with its widely accepted solution: equipoise. In this scoping review, uses of equipoise in discussions of randomized controlled trials (RCT) of COVID-19 therapies are evaluated to answer three questions. First, how has equipoise been applied to COVID-19 research? Second, has equipoise been employed accurately? And third, do concerns about equipoise pose a barrier to the ethical conduct of COVID-19 RCTs? METHODS: Google Scholar and Pubmed were searched for articles containing substantial discussion about equipoise and COVID-19 RCTs. 347 article titles were screened, 91 full text articles were assessed, and 48 articles were included. Uses of equipoise were analyzed and abstracted into seven categories. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Approximately two-thirds of articles (33/48 articles) used equipoise in a way that is consistent with the concept. They invoked equipoise to support (1) RCTs of specific therapies, (2) RCTs in general, and (3) the early termination of RCTs after achieving the primary outcome. Approximately one-third of articles (15/48 articles) used equipoise in a manner that is inconsistent with the concept. These articles argued that physician preference, widespread use of unproven therapies, patient preference, or expectation of therapeutic benefit may undermine equipoise and render RCTs unethical. In each case, the purported ethical problem can be resolved by correcting the use of equipoise. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the continued relevance of equipoise as it supports the conduct of well-conceived RCTs and provides moral guidance to physicians and researchers as they search for effective therapies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Therapeutic Equipoise
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 10.
Article | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110082

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several quantitative studies have found a decline in physical activity in response to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. The aim of the present study was to use large-scale free text survey data to qualitatively gain a more in-depth understanding of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physical activity, then map barriers and facilitators to the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation, and Behaviour (COM-B) Model of Behaviour to aid future intervention development. METHODS: 17,082 participants provided a response to the free text module, and data from those who mentioned a physical activity related word in any context were included. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and key themes identified. RESULTS: 5396 participants provided 7490 quotes related to physical activity. The sample were predominately female (84%), white (British/Irish/Other) (97%) and aged <60 years (57%). Seven key themes were identified: the importance of outdoor space, changes in daily routine, COVID-19 restrictions prevented participation, perceived risks or threats to participation, the importance of physical health, the importance of physical activity for mental health and the use of technology. CONCLUSION: Future physical activity interventions could encourage people to walk outdoors, which is low cost, flexible, and accessible to many. Developing online resources to promote and support physical activity provides a flexible way to deliver quality content to a large audience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Exercise/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110081

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the research paper is to analyse the factors affecting remote work in terms of the selected socio-economic criteria and to determine which elements contribute the most to the development of sustainable work. In addition, the study describes the issues of remote education at the academic level and the challenges faced by academic teachers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The whole is embedded in the issues of occupational health and safety, with particular emphasis on the psychosocial aspects of the occupational safety of academic teachers in Poland. In the research process, the TOPSIS multi-criteria analysis tool (technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution) was used, as well as AHP (analytical hierarchy process), as an auxiliary method. The use of these methods made it possible to select the most important variable and to determine the ranking of factors affecting the analysed problem. Findings: According to the conducted research, the most important factor affecting the safety of remote work-in relation to the selected sustainability criteria-is overwork/workload. An equally important element was stress during remote work, as well as the organization of time, with consideration to the balance between work and home duties. The research has shown that the selected aspects of remote work can have a significant impact on the achievement of sustainable development goals by a given organization, and in relation to individuals, on the quality of life and the sense of safety and health at work.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , Humans , Sustainable Development , Quality of Life , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110080

ABSTRACT

This paper elucidates the relationship between possible changes in volunteering experienced by older people during the COVID-19 pandemic, and their motivation to volunteer, as well as the direct or indirect experience of COVID-19 symptoms. Given the well-known positive benefits of volunteering in older age both for individuals (in terms of improved health and wellbeing) and society at large, there is a paucity of studies on older volunteers in the time of COVID-19. In this context, older people's volunteering was highly challenged due to age-based physical and social restrictions put in place by national governments, which have been considered as ageist by a large part of the gerontological scientific community. This study was carried out on a sample of 240 Italian older volunteers. The results suggest that during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially older volunteers driven by social goals (e.g., opportunities to have relationships with others) were able to continue volunteer activities without needing to change them. The study also clarified that having directly or indirectly experienced COVID-19 symptoms did not influence changes in voluntary activities of older people. These results have important policy implications, given the indication that through volunteering, older individuals may try to counter the undesired calls by the governments for self-isolation and physical distancing. It is important that in emergency situations involving older people, policy makers should not treat them as only recipients of health and social care, but also as useful providers of help in the community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Motivation , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Volunteers
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110079

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the outbreak of COVID-19, online public opinion related to the epidemic was rapidly generated and developed rapidly. If some online public opinions cannot be effectively responded to and guided, it will bring risks to social order. The government should understand how to use information on social media to grasp public demands, provide useful information in a timely manner and take countermeasures. Studying the formation mechanism of online public opinion during the outbreak can help the government make scientific decisions and improve risk management capabilities. METHODS: The research selects the public opinion information of online platforms represented by WeChat, online communities, Sina Weibo and search engines, involving 75 relevant texts (1 January to 31 March 2022). According to the grounded theory method, using the QSR NVivo12 qualitative research software, the collected network texts were successively researched using open coding, axial coding and theoretical coding. RESULTS: The structure of online public opinion during the COVID-19 epidemic was obtained. The operation mechanism of the online public opinion system about COVID-19 was mainly affected by the interaction of online public opinion objects, online public opinion subjects, online public opinion intermediaries and government forces. It was based on social facts and citizens' appeals as the starting point, subject behaviors and prevention and control measures as the focus, government's governance as macro-control and citizens' evaluation as the guide. CONCLUSIONS: Scientific analysis of online public opinion is an important tool to identify and manage risks and improve the quality of government activities. Online public opinion has the function of assisting government decision-making, and the government can identify the important information reflected in it, especially the mainstream public opinion, as a reference for decision-making. By taking effective measures and properly responding to citizens' reasonable demands, the government can prevent social risks and avoid new negative public opinions. Contributions: According to the characteristics of the basic model of online public opinion, this study provides risk mitigation suggestions for Chinese public sectors to use online public opinion, optimize epidemic prevention policies and formulate strategic measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Opinion , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Grounded Theory , China/epidemiology , Risk Management
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110078

ABSTRACT

This was a systematic review of studies examining the effect of COVID-19 on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children and adolescents. The review was conducted by examining the current literature and analyzing up-to-date evidence. The studies were extracted from three major databases (CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE, and Web of Science) and analyzed. Studies on children and adolescents whose HRQoL has been affected by COVID-19 were included based on the eligibility criteria. Ultimately, eight studies met these criteria. The evidence of the selected studies was analyzed; the research design, age categories, respondents, evaluation tools, gender differences, and variability before and during COVID-19 were systematically reviewed. This review found differences in these groups regarding oral symptoms, functional limitations, emotional well-being, and social well-being. Furthermore, this review highlighted the relative paucity of studies that comprehensively investigate the latest evidence of changes in the HRQoL of children and adolescents due to COVID-19 in preparation for the post-COVID era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Child , Adolescent , Humans , Quality of Life/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sex Factors
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110077

ABSTRACT

Studies suggest that persistent symptoms after COVID-19 (long COVID) influence functioning and activities of daily living (ADL). However, it is still uncertain how and to what extent. This study aimed to describe patient-reported mental fatigue, ADL problems, ADL ability, sick leave and functional status among patients with long COVID. In this cross-sectional study, 448 patients, ≥18 years old and referred to occupational therapy at a Danish Post-COVID-19 Clinic, were included. Mental fatigue was measured by the Mental Fatigue Scale, ADL problems and ability were measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, sick leave was self-reported and functional status was evaluated by the Post-COVID-19 Functional Status Scale. Mean age was 46.8 years, 73% of the patients were female, and 75% suffered from moderate to severe mental fatigue. The majority reported difficulties performing productive and leisure activities. The median performance and satisfaction scores were 4.8 and 3, respectively. In total, 56% of the patients were on sick leave, and 94% were referred to rehabilitation. A decrease in functional status was found between pre-COVID-19 and assessment. Conclusively, the patients were highly affected in their everyday life and had distinct rehabilitation needs. Future research is needed to address causalities and rehabilitation for this patient group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sick Leave , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Male , Activities of Daily Living , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Functional Status , Canada , Mental Fatigue/epidemiology
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110076

ABSTRACT

With the arrival of COVID-19, educational systems have had to adapt to the social and health situation immediately. This led to the appearance of the asynchronous teaching model. Throughout the pandemic, at the educational level, we can distinguish three phases, eminently online, hybrid, and finally, face-to-face. However, the perception of educational quality in these three educational moments, taking into account the psychometric profile and gender, has not been studied. Thus, 1093 university students from Ibero-American countries were analyzed. Through a questionnaire, demographic, academic, and psychological variables were analyzed at three moments during the evolution of the pandemic. Data suggest that, during the lockdown phase, while teaching was eminently online, students presented higher levels of stress and higher difficulty of learning; class attendance, convenience, preferred method of learning, grading score, and motivation were lower, compared to other phases of teaching (hybrid and face-to-face). During this period, females presented higher stress levels than males, as well as higher levels of anxiety and loneliness, without gender differences among the other studied variables. During the hybrid and face-to-face phases, male students presented higher values in the results of difficulty learning and demanding activities. No differences were seen regarding motivation, synchronous class attendance, learning level, grades, convenience, or preferred learning method. The results from the present study suggest that, despite the effect of the pandemic on mental health, asynchronous education is postulated as an effective teaching-learning alternative. Yet, a special focus should be given to female students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , United States , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sex Factors , Universities , Communicable Disease Control , Students
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110075

ABSTRACT

The article summarizes the arguments and counterarguments in the scholarly discussion about the problem of choosing a model of healthcare organization. The study's primary goal was to identify the economic efficiency of the public health system and resistance to COVID-19. The relevance of addressing this research issue is that the epidemiological challenges posed by the pandemic worldwide have manifested themselves differently in various countries. Therefore, it is advisable to consider the effectiveness of public healthcare models and how they have worked out in the fight against COVID-19. Research in the work was carried out in the following logical sequence: conducting scientometric analysis of research, creation of a statistical research base for 22 countries of the world; construction of integral indices of the economic efficiency of the health care system; calculation of public health system resilience to the COVID-19 pandemic; application of frontier DEA analysis to determine system efficiency; comparison and analysis of the results of research on the economic efficiency of public health systems obtained by different methods. The article presents the results of a comparison of the economic efficiency of the public health system, which showed that the system built according to the Beveridge principle is the most resistant to the pandemic and, at the same time, has the highest indices of economic efficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110074

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a huge impact on all areas of human life. Since the risk of biological threats will persist in the future, it is very important to ensure mobilization readiness for a prompt response to the possible emergence of epidemics of infectious diseases. Therefore, from both a theoretical and practical standpoint, it is currently necessary to conduct a thorough examination of the COVID-19 epidemic. The goal of this research is to investigate the underlying processes that led to the COVID-19 pandemic in Russia and to identify ways to improve preventive measures and ensure mobilization readiness for a quick response to potential COVID-19-like pandemics. This research will analyze the daily dynamics of the number of infection cases and the number of new lethal cases of COVID-19. We analyzed the daily number of new cases of COVID-19 infection N(d), the daily number of new lethal cases L(d), their percentage ratio L(d)/N(d) 100% in Russia for 2 years of the pandemic (from the beginning of the pandemic to 23 March 2022), the rate of increase and decrease of these indicators (dN(d)/dd and dL(d)/dd), as well as their spectra created on the basis of wavelet analysis. Wavelet analysis of the deep structure of the N(d) and L(d) wavelet spectra made it possible to identify the presence of internal cycles, the study of which makes it possible to predict the presence of days with the maximum number of infections and new deaths in a pandemic similar to COVID-19 and outline ways and methods for improving preventive measures and measures to ensure mobilization readiness for a rapid response to the potential emergence of pandemics similar to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Russia/epidemiology , Wavelet Analysis
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110073

ABSTRACT

The correct treatment of most non-transmissible diseases requires, in addition to adequate medication, adherence to physical activity and diet guidelines, as well as health data monitoring and patient motivation. The restrictions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic made telemedicine tools and mobile apps the best choice for monitoring patient compliance. The objective of this study was to analyze the benefits of an m-Health solution designed specifically for chronic patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. A pragmatic clinical trial with pre-post measurements of a single group was carried out with 70 patients (aged 40+) with one or more chronic conditions. Patients were provided with an ad hoc mobile app and health data measuring devices according to their diseases. The health status of the patients was monitored remotely by health professionals who could also modify the patient's objectives according to their evolution. The results obtained show an average fulfillment of objectives of 77%. Higher fulfillment values: medication adherence (98%) and oxygen saturation (82%); lower fulfillment values: weight (48%), glucose (57%), and distance walked (57%). Globally, the ad hoc app was rated 8.72 points out of 10 (standard deviation 1.10). Concerning the pre-post analysis, there were significant improvements vs. prior apps used by the participants in the following items: improved physical activation and better control of blood pressure, diet, weight, glucose, and oxygen saturation. In conclusion, the telemedicine tool developed was useful in increasing patient engagement and adherence to treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Patient Participation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Glucose , Primary Health Care
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several reports from around the world have reported that some patients who have recovered from COVID-19 have experienced a range of persistent or new clinical symptoms after a SARS-CoV-2 infection. These symptoms can last from weeks to months, impacting everyday functioning to a significant number of patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis based on an online, self-reporting questionnaire was conducted in Ecuador from April to July 2022. Participants were invited by social media, radio, and TV to voluntarily participate in our study. A total of 2103 surveys were included in this study. We compared socio-demographic variables and long-term persisting symptoms at low (<2500 m) and high altitude (>2500 m). RESULTS: Overall, 1100 (52.3%) responders claimed to have Long-COVID symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Most of these were reported by women (64.0%); the most affected group was young adults between 21 to 40 years (68.5%), and most long-haulers were mestizos (91.6%). We found that high altitude residents were more likely to report persisting symptoms (71.7%) versus those living at lower altitudes (29.3%). The most common symptoms were fatigue or tiredness (8.4%), hair loss (5.1%) and difficulty concentrating (5.0%). The highest proportion of symptoms was observed in the group that received less than 2 doses. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study describing post-COVID symptoms' persistence in low and high-altitude residents. Our findings demonstrate that women, especially those aging between 21-40, are more likely to describe Long-COVID. We also found that living at a high altitude was associated with higher reports of mood changes, tachycardia, decreased libido, insomnia, and palpitations compared to lowlanders. Finally, we found a greater risk to report Long-COVID symptoms among women, those with previous comorbidities and those who had a severer acute SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Altitude , COVID-19 , Young Adult , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110071

ABSTRACT

School teachers have faced many challenges due to the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and public health-related containment measures. Recent studies have demonstrated high levels of stress and mental health issues among school teachers. To better understand teacher well-being and inform practices to support them in the face of the ongoing pandemic, we aimed to assess perceived stress, well-being and associated factors among school teachers in Hong Kong, China. For this cross-sectional study, we employed a self-reported questionnaire to assess teacher well-being as an indicator of mental health. Drawing on quantitative data obtained from 336 teachers in Hong Kong from April 2021 to February 2022, we assessed workloads, work-related sense of coherence, perceived stress, secondary burnout symptoms (i.e. intensification of work and exhaustion related to work situation), self-endangering work behaviours and satisfaction with work. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between well-being, demographic and work characteristics. A high percentage (87.6%) of teachers had high levels of perceived stress, which was positively associated with extensification of work (r = 0.571, p < 0.01), intensification of work (r = 0.640, p < 0.01) and exhaustion related to work situation (r = 0.554, p < 0.01). A multilinear regression model adjusted for age and gender was computed to detect predictors of teachers' well-being index values (F(12, 296) = 41.405, p < 0.001, R2 = 0.627). A higher WHO-5 score was associated with (1) higher teaching hours (B = 0.235, 95% CI = 0.093, 0.413, p = 0.002); (2) higher work-related sense of coherence (B = 2.490, 95% CI = 0.209, 4.770, p = 0.032); (3) higher work satisfaction (B = 5.410, 95% CI = 2.979, 7.841, p < 0.001); (4) lower level of exhaustion related to work situations (B = -9.677, 95% CI = -12.279, -7.075, p < 0.001); and (5) lower level of psychosomatic complaints (B = -4.167, 95% CI = -6.739, -7.075, p = 0.002). These findings highlight the critical need to allocate more attention and resources to improve the mental health of school teachers in Hong Kong. The findings can also inform the development of psychological and organisational interventions and support mechanisms for teachers during the prolonged COVID-19 pandemic and in preparation for future stressful scenarios. Safeguarding the well-being and mental health of teachers is important for improving the quality of teaching and learning environments and the mental health of school students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , China/epidemiology
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110070

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to analyze the changes in physical activity and physical fitness between the beginning of the first academic year after a confinement (November 2020) and the beginning of the second academic year after a confinement ("new normality": November 2021) in a cohort of adolescents. Moreover, the evolution of physical fitness after controlling for physical activity was examined. A total of 687 students (M = 15.35, SD = 1.677) from a high school located in a rural town in northern Spain gave information on their physical activity (PA) levels in two different periods. Linear mixed models were used to examine these changes. The results indicated that vigorous physical activity (VPA) and the metabolic equivalent of task (MET) significantly increased between the two periods. A growth tendency of several components of fitness (upper body power, strength endurance, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and eye-hand coordination) was also observed. Finally, the results indicated that belonging to a sports club and getting involved in more VPA better explained the development in cardiovascular and muscle fitness between the two time points. Thus, the results of this study highlighted the relevance of membership in a sports club and vigorous PA in order to mitigate the potential negative effect of social distancing measures on physical fitness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sports , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Physical Fitness/physiology , Exercise/physiology
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110069

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused serious health problems that affected people around the globe. This study aims to understand the physical distress (PhyD), psychological distress (PsyD), and coping experiences among people infected with COVID-19, develop a grounded theory, and examine PhyD, PsyD, and coping among people infected with COVID-19. A sequential exploratory mixed methods strategy is employed. A qualitative procedure is based on a grounded theory; data collection includes observation and in-depth interviews with 25 participants, aged 18 years and above. The quantitative one included 180 participants. Content analysis was applied using the Strauss and Corbin method, and ATLAS.ti software. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, and the independent t-test were used. Results: The six major themes, including (1) severity of COVID-19 symptoms, (2) death anxiety, (3) uncertainty, (4) barrier to healthcare access, (5) compliance and self-regulation coping (6) post-COVID-19 effects. PhyD, PsyD, and coping were all at a moderate level. The relationship between PhyD, PsyD, and coping was positive. The prevalence in post-COVID-19 effects was 70% (95% CI 63.3-76.4%). There were higher amounts in women than men. The most frequent residual symptoms were decreased activity tolerance (40%), fatigue (33.3%), anxiety and fear of abnormal lungs (33.3%), dyspnea (27.8%), allergy (24.4%), and lung impairment (22.2%). Moreover, the prevalence of more than two symptoms was 54% (95% CI 47.2-61.7%). This study considers that the healthcare providers should be concerned with sufficient healthcare services. Interventions are needed for supporting their recovery from COVID-19 effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Services , Adaptation, Psychological
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL