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1.
Commun Biol ; 5(1): 1421, 2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612213

ABSTRACT

As the SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) pandemic continues to spread, several variants of the virus, with mutations distributed all over the viral genome, are emerging. While most of the variants present mutations having little to no effects at the phenotypic level, some of these variants are spreading at a rate that suggests they may present a selective advantage. In particular, these rapidly spreading variants present specific mutations on the spike protein. These observations call for an urgent need to characterize the effects of these variants' mutations on phenotype features like contagiousness and antigenicity. With this aim, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on a selected set of possible spike variants in order to assess the stabilizing effect of particular amino acid substitutions on the molecular complex. We specifically focused on the mutations that are both characteristic of the top three most worrying variants at the moment, i.e the English, South African, and Amazonian ones, and that occur at the molecular interface between SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and its human ACE2 receptor. We characterize these variants' effect in terms of (i) residue mobility, (ii) compactness, studying the network of interactions at the interface, and (iii) variation of shape complementarity via expanding the molecular surfaces in the Zernike basis. Overall, our analyses highlighted greater stability of the three variant complexes with respect to both the wild type and two negative control systems, especially for the English and Amazonian variants. In addition, in the three variants, we investigate the effects a not-yet observed mutation in position 501 could provoke on complex stability. We found that a phenylalanine mutation behaves similarly to the English variant and may cooperate in further increasing the stability of the South African one, hinting at the need for careful surveillance for the emergence of these mutations in the population. Ultimately, we show that the proposed observables describe key features for the stability of the ACE2-spike complex and can help to monitor further possible spike variants.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding
2.
Curr Opin Immunol ; 72: 126-134, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606183

ABSTRACT

Membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46), a ubiquitously expressed complement regulatory protein, serves as a cofactor for serine protease factor I to cleave and inactivate C3b and C4b deposited on host cells. However, CD46 also plays roles in human reproduction, autophagy, modulating T cell activation and effector functions and is a member of the newly identified intracellular complement system (complosome). CD46 also is a receptor for 11 pathogens ('pathogen magnet'). While CD46 deficiencies contribute to inflammatory disorders, its overexpression in cancers and role as a receptor for some adenoviruses has led to its targeting by oncolytic agents and adenoviral-based therapeutic vectors, including coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines. This review focuses on recent advances in identifying disease-causing CD46 variants and its pathogen connections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Membrane Cofactor Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Animals , Autophagy , Complement Activation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation , Membrane Cofactor Protein/genetics , Oncolytic Virotherapy , Polymorphism, Genetic , Reproduction
3.
Curr Opin Immunol ; 72: 230-238, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603901

ABSTRACT

The study of monogenic autoimmune diseases has provided key insights into molecular mechanisms involved in development of autoimmunity and immune tolerance. It has also become clear that such inborn errors of immunity (IEIs) frequently present clinically not only with autoimmune diseases, but also frequently have increased susceptibility to infection. The genes associated with monogenic autoimmunity influence diverse functional pathways, and the resulting immune dysregulation also impacts the complex and coordinated immune response to pathogens, for example type I interferon and cytokine signaling, the complement pathway and proper differentiation of the immune response. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has highlighted how monogenic autoimmunity can increase risk for serious infection with the discovery of severe disease in patients with pre-existing antibodies to Type I IFNs. This review discusses recent insight into the relationship between monogenic autoimmunity and infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Communicable Diseases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Communicable Diseases/genetics , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Interferon Type I/metabolism
4.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0257963, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608831

ABSTRACT

In times of crisis, including the current COVID-19 pandemic, the supply chain of filtering facepiece respirators, such as N95 respirators, are disrupted. To combat shortages of N95 respirators, many institutions were forced to decontaminate and reuse respirators. While several reports have evaluated the impact on filtration as a measurement of preservation of respirator function after decontamination, the equally important fact of maintaining proper fit to the users' face has been understudied. In the current study, we demonstrate the complete inactivation of SARS-CoV-2 and preservation of fit test performance of N95 respirators following treatment with dry heat. We apply scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, Raman spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements to analyze filter material changes as a consequence of different decontamination treatments. We further compared the integrity of the respirator after autoclaving versus dry heat treatment via quantitative fit testing and found that autoclaving, but not dry heat, causes the fit of the respirator onto the users face to fail, thereby rendering the decontaminated respirator unusable. Our findings highlight the importance to account for both efficacy of disinfection and mask fit when reprocessing respirators to for clinical redeployment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Decontamination/methods , Equipment Reuse , N95 Respirators/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/transmission , Equipment and Supplies , Health Personnel , Hot Temperature , Humans , Pandemics
6.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262162, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605852

ABSTRACT

Analysis of convalescent plasma derived from individuals has shown that IgG3 has the most important role in binding to SARS-CoV-2 antigens; however, this has not yet been confirmed in large studies, and the link between binding and neutralization has not been confirmed. By analyzing plasma pools consisting of 247-567 individual convalescent donors, we demonstrated the binding of IgG3 and IgM to Spike-1 protein and the receptor-binding domain correlates strongly with viral neutralization in vitro. Furthermore, despite accounting for only approximately 12% of total immunoglobulin mass, collectively IgG3 and IgM account for approximately 80% of the total neutralization. This may have important implications for the development of potent therapies for COVID-19, as it indicates that hyperimmune globulins or convalescent plasma donations with high IgG3 concentrations may be a highly efficacious therapy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Convalescence , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Chlorocebus aethiops , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells
8.
Int J Mol Med ; 49(2)2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594678

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19) is mainly dependent on the underlying mechanisms that mediate the entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) into the host cells of the various human tissues/organs. Recent studies have indicated a higher order of complexity of the mechanisms of infectivity, given that there is a wide­repertoire of possible cell entry mediators that appear to co­localise in a cell­ and tissue­specific manner. The present study provides an overview of the 'canonical' SARS­CoV­2 mediators, namely angiotensin converting enzyme 2, transmembrane protease serine 2 and 4, and neuropilin­1, expanding on the involvement of novel candidates, including glucose­regulated protein 78, basigin, kidney injury molecule­1, metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2, ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (also termed tumour necrosis factor­α convertase) and Toll­like receptor 4. Furthermore, emerging data indicate that changes in microRNA (miRNA/miR) expression levels in patients with COVID­19 are suggestive of further complexity in the regulation of these viral mediators. An in silico analysis revealed 160 candidate miRNAs with potential strong binding capacity in the aforementioned genes. Future studies should concentrate on elucidating the association between the cellular tropism of the SARS­CoV­2 cell entry mediators and the mechanisms through which they might affect the clinical outcome. Finally, the clinical utility as a biomarker or therapeutic target of miRNAs in the context of COVID­19 warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , /metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Viral Tropism
9.
J Immunotoxicol ; 18(1): 23-29, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593522

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 of 2019 (COVID-19) causes a pandemic that has been diagnosed in more than 70 million people worldwide. Mild-to-moderate COVID-19 symptoms include coughing, fever, myalgia, shortness of breath, and acute inflammatory lung injury (ALI). In contrast, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and respiratory failure occur in patients diagnosed with severe COVID-19. ARDS is mediated, at least in part, by a dysregulated inflammatory response due to excessive levels of circulating cytokines, a condition known as the "cytokine-storm syndrome." Currently, there are FDA-approved therapies that attenuate the dysregulated inflammation that occurs in COVID-19 patients, such as dexamethasone or other corticosteroids and IL-6 inhibitors, including sarilumab, tocilizumab, and siltuximab. However, the efficacy of these treatments have been shown to be inconsistent. Compounds that activate the vagus nerve-mediated cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex, such as the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, GTS-21, attenuate ARDS/inflammatory lung injury by decreasing the extracellular levels of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the airways and the circulation. It is possible that HMGB1 may be an important mediator of the "cytokine-storm syndrome." Notably, high plasma levels of HMGB1 have been reported in patients diagnosed with severe COVID-19, and there is a significant negative correlation between HMGB1 plasma levels and clinical outcomes. Nicotine can activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex, which attenuates the up-regulation and the excessive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Therefore, we hypothesize that low molecular weight compounds that activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex, such as nicotine or GTS-21, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to attenuate the dysregulated inflammatory responses in patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Benzylidene Compounds/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cholinergic Agents/pharmacology , Inflammation/drug therapy , Nicotine/metabolism , Pyridines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tobacco Use Disorder/drug therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Cigarette Smoking/adverse effects , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , HMGB1 Protein/blood , Humans , Pandemics , alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor/agonists
10.
Am J Chin Med ; 49(8): 1965-1999, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599109

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a chronic and irreversible interstitial lung disease that even threatens the lives of some patients infected with COVID-19. PF is a multicellular pathological process, including the initial injuries of epithelial cells, recruitment of inflammatory cells, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, activation and differentiation of fibroblasts, etc. TGF-[Formula: see text]1 acts as a key effect factor that participates in these cellular processes of PF. Recently, much attention was paid to inhibiting TGF-[Formula: see text]1 mediated cell processes in the treatment of PF with Chinese herbal medicines (CHM), an important part of traditional Chinese medicine. Here, this review first summarized the effects of TGF-[Formula: see text]1 in different cellular processes of PF. Then, this review summarized the recent research on CHM (compounds, multi-components, single medicines and prescriptions) to directly and/or indirectly inhibit TGF-[Formula: see text]1 signaling (TLRs, PPARs, micrRNA, etc.) in PF. Most of the research focused on CHM natural compounds, including but not limited to alkaloids, flavonoids, phenols and terpenes. After review, the research perspectives of CHM on TGF-[Formula: see text]1 inhibition in PF were further discussed. This review hopes that revealing the inhibiting effects of CHM on TGF-[Formula: see text]1-mediated cellular processes of PF can promote CHM to be better understood and utilized, thus transforming the therapeutic activities of CHM into practice.


Subject(s)
Cell Physiological Phenomena/drug effects , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Phytotherapy/methods , Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism
11.
PLoS Biol ; 19(12): e3001490, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595018

ABSTRACT

Over the past 20 years, 3 highly pathogenic human coronaviruses (HCoVs) have emerged-Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and, most recently, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-demonstrating that coronaviruses (CoVs) pose a serious threat to human health and highlighting the importance of developing effective therapies against them. Similar to other viruses, CoVs are dependent on host factors for their survival and replication. We hypothesized that evolutionarily distinct CoVs may exploit similar host factors and pathways to support their replication cycles. Herein, we conducted 2 independent genome-wide CRISPR/Cas-9 knockout (KO) screens to identify MERS-CoV and HCoV-229E host dependency factors (HDFs) required for HCoV replication in the human Huh7 cell line. Top scoring genes were further validated and assessed in the context of MERS-CoV and HCoV-229E infection as well as SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Strikingly, we found that several autophagy-related genes, including TMEM41B, MINAR1, and the immunophilin FKBP8, were common host factors required for pan-CoV replication. Importantly, inhibition of the immunophilin protein family with the compounds cyclosporine A, and the nonimmunosuppressive derivative alisporivir, resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of CoV replication in primary human nasal epithelial cell cultures, which recapitulate the natural site of virus replication. Overall, we identified host factors that are crucial for CoV replication and demonstrated that these factors constitute potential targets for therapeutic intervention by clinically approved drugs.


Subject(s)
Autophagy/genetics , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Gene Knockdown Techniques , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24171, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593554

ABSTRACT

The transmission of COVID-19 is dependent on social mixing, the basic rate of which varies with sociodemographic, cultural, and geographic factors. Alterations in social mixing and subsequent changes in transmission dynamics eventually affect hospital admissions. We employ these observations to model and predict regional hospital admissions in Sweden during the COVID-19 pandemic. We use an SEIR-model for each region in Sweden in which the social mixing is assumed to depend on mobility data from public transport utilisation and locations for mobile phone usage. The results show that the model could capture the timing of the first and beginning of the second wave of the pandemic 3 weeks in advance without any additional assumptions about seasonality. Further, we show that for two major regions of Sweden, models with public transport data outperform models using mobile phone usage. We conclude that a model based on routinely collected mobility data makes it possible to predict future hospital admissions for COVID-19 3 weeks in advance.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19/transmission , Cell Phone/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Models, Theoretical , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting/methods , Geography , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/trends , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sweden/epidemiology , Travel/statistics & numerical data
14.
Mol Cells ; 44(12): 861-878, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592997

ABSTRACT

The human genome contains many retroviral elements called human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), resulting from the integration of retroviruses throughout evolution. HERVs once were considered inactive junk because they are not replication-competent, primarily localized in the heterochromatin, and silenced by methylation. But HERVs are now clearly shown to actively regulate gene expression in various physiological and pathological conditions such as developmental processes, immune regulation, cancers, autoimmune diseases, and neurological disorders. Recent studies report that HERVs are activated in patients suffering from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the current pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) infection. In this review, we describe internal and external factors that influence HERV activities. We also present evidence showing the gene regulatory activity of HERV LTRs (long terminal repeats) in model organisms such as mice, rats, zebrafish, and invertebrate models of worms and flies. Finally, we discuss several molecular and cellular pathways involving various transcription factors and receptors, through which HERVs affect downstream cellular and physiological events such as epigenetic modifications, calcium influx, protein phosphorylation, and cytokine release. Understanding how HERVs participate in various physiological and pathological processes will help develop a strategy to generate effective therapeutic approaches targeting HERVs.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Endogenous Retroviruses/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Models, Animal , Neoplasms/genetics , Terminal Repeat Sequences/genetics , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/virology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Neoplasms/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
15.
Front Biosci (Elite Ed) ; 13(2): 272-290, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591755

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a lethal virus that was detected back on 31st December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei province in China, and since then this virus has been spreading across the globe causing a global outbreak and has left the world fighting against the virus. The disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 was named COVID-19 and this was declared a pandemic disease by the World Health Organization on 11th March 2020. Several nations are trying to develop a vaccine that can save millions of lives. This review outlines the morphological features of the virus describing the outer and inner structures of the virus along with the entry mechanism of the virus into the host body and the infection process. Detailed reports of global outbreak along with preventive measures have also been included, with special emphasis on China, the United States of America, India, Italy, and South Korea. Broad-spectrum antiviral drugs being used at various health care centres around the world, namely Remdesivir, Camostat & Nafamostat, Famotidine, Chloroquine & Hydroxychloroquine, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Ivermectin, and Tocilizumab & Sarilumab have also been included. World Health Organization guidelines on preventive measures and use of soaps, alcohol-based hand-rubs and wearing face masks have also been described. The vaccines that are in one of the phases of human trials, namely Oxford University's vaccine, the United States-based Moderna's vaccine, India's Covaxin and the Russian vaccine, have also been incorporated in the review article.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
17.
J Phys Chem Lett ; 12(51): 12249-12255, 2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586057

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 and other coronaviruses pose major threats to global health, yet computational efforts to understand them have largely overlooked the process of budding, a key part of the coronavirus life cycle. When expressed together, coronavirus M and E proteins are sufficient to facilitate budding into the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). To help elucidate budding, we ran atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the Feig laboratory's refined structural models of the SARS-CoV-2 M protein dimer and E protein pentamer. Our MD simulations consisted of M protein dimers and E protein pentamers in patches of membrane. By examining where these proteins induced membrane curvature in silico, we obtained insights around how the budding process may occur. Multiple M protein dimers acted together to induce global membrane curvature through protein-lipid interactions while E protein pentamers kept the membrane planar. These results could eventually help guide development of antiviral therapeutics that inhibit coronavirus budding.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/chemistry , Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism , Golgi Apparatus/metabolism , Humans , Protein Multimerization , Protein Transport , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Matrix Proteins/chemistry
18.
Cell Death Dis ; 12(12): 1156, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585874

ABSTRACT

Lots of cell death initiator and effector molecules, signalling pathways and subcellular sites have been identified as key mediators in both cell death processes in cancer. The XDeathDB visualization platform provides a comprehensive cell death and their crosstalk resource for deciphering the signaling network organization of interactions among different cell death modes associated with 1461 cancer types and COVID-19, with an aim to understand the molecular mechanisms of physiological cell death in disease and facilitate systems-oriented novel drug discovery in inducing cell deaths properly. Apoptosis, autosis, efferocytosis, ferroptosis, immunogenic cell death, intrinsic apoptosis, lysosomal cell death, mitotic cell death, mitochondrial permeability transition, necroptosis, parthanatos, and pyroptosis related to 12 cell deaths and their crosstalk can be observed systematically by the platform. Big data for cell death gene-disease associations, gene-cell death pathway associations, pathway-cell death mode associations, and cell death-cell death associations is collected by literature review articles and public database from iRefIndex, STRING, BioGRID, Reactom, Pathway's commons, DisGeNET, DrugBank, and Therapeutic Target Database (TTD). An interactive webtool, XDeathDB, is built by web applications with R-Shiny, JavaScript (JS) and Shiny Server Iso. With this platform, users can search specific interactions from vast interdependent networks that occur in the realm of cell death. A multilayer spectral graph clustering method that performs convex layer aggregation to identify crosstalk function among cell death modes for a specific cancer. 147 hallmark genes of cell death could be observed in detail in these networks. These potential druggable targets are displayed systematically and tailoring networks to visualize specified relations is available to fulfil user-specific needs. Users can access XDeathDB for free at https://pcm2019.shinyapps.io/XDeathDB/ .


Subject(s)
Cell Death/physiology , Regulated Cell Death/physiology , Signal Transduction/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cluster Analysis , Databases, Factual , Humans , Necroptosis , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/physiopathology , Phagocytosis , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Software
19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 23378, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585808

ABSTRACT

Emissions of black carbon (BC) particles from anthropogenic and natural sources contribute to climate change and human health impacts. Therefore, they need to be accurately quantified to develop an effective mitigation strategy. Although the spread of the emission flux estimates for China have recently narrowed under the constraints of atmospheric observations, consensus has not been reached regarding the dominant emission sector. Here, we quantified the contribution of the residential sector, as 64% (44-82%) in 2019, using the response of the observed atmospheric concentration in the outflowing air during Feb-Mar 2020, with the prevalence of the COVID-19 pandemic and restricted human activities over China. In detail, the BC emission fluxes, estimated after removing effects from meteorological variability, dropped only slightly (- 18%) during Feb-Mar 2020 from the levels in the previous year for selected air masses of Chinese origin, suggesting the contributions from the transport and industry sectors (36%) were smaller than the rest from the residential sector (64%). Carbon monoxide (CO) behaved differently, with larger emission reductions (- 35%) in the period Feb-Mar 2020, suggesting dominance of non-residential (i.e., transport and industry) sectors, which contributed 70% (48-100%) emission during 2019. The estimated BC/CO emission ratio for these sectors will help to further constrain bottom-up emission inventories. We comprehensively provide a clear scientific evidence supporting mitigation policies targeting reduction in residential BC emissions from China by demonstrating the economic feasibility using marginal abatement cost curves.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants/analysis , Air Pollution/analysis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Particulate Matter/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Soot/analysis , Algorithms , Atmosphere/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , China , Climate Change , Environmental Monitoring/methods , Environmental Monitoring/statistics & numerical data , Geography , Human Activities , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , Residence Characteristics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Seasons , Wind
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24124, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585805

ABSTRACT

The quantification of spreading heterogeneity in the COVID-19 epidemic is crucial as it affects the choice of efficient mitigating strategies irrespective of whether its origin is biological or social. We present a method to deduce temporal and individual variations in the basic reproduction number directly from epidemic trajectories at a community level. Using epidemic data from the 98 districts in Denmark we estimate an overdispersion factor k for COVID-19 to be about 0.11 (95% confidence interval 0.08-0.18), implying that 10 % of the infected cause between 70 % and 87 % of all infections.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Basic Reproduction Number/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/transmission , Models, Theoretical , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Denmark/epidemiology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Geography , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
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