Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 173
Filter
1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 860297, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776090

ABSTRACT

The internet has influenced human wellbeing through social networking, time-saving, diffusion of knowledge, and access to health information. Health is a key component of human quality of life. This study examines the nexus between education, the internet, and quality of life using data from China spanning the period from 1991 to 2020. The study used ARDL to examine the short and long-term, exploring education and the impact of the internet on quality of life. Education status plays a significant role in promoting quality of life in the short and long term. The empirical findings show the significant positive impact of the internet and ICT on quality of life in the short and long-run. Financial development and FDI improve the quality of life in the long-term in China. Based on these results, policymakers in China should develop the ICT infrastructure and human capital to support increased quality of life.


Subject(s)
Educational Status , Internet , Quality of Life , Humans , Social Networking
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 819371, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776013

ABSTRACT

Service industries contribute significantly to the economic, social, and even life aspect of the world. However, service innovation has been rarely discussed in healthcare context, especially in the digital healthcare context Service innovation needs to be organized in the premise of mutual trust to be efficient, thereby improving service performance. The trust and efficiency here demands a good online platform service to both virtualize the interaction processes and maintain trust and agency. This research uses social network theory and agency theory to emphasize the importance of trust in cooperation in hospitals, and the relationship between organizational trust and organizational performance. Furthermore, we analyzed the role of agents in enhancing the relationship between service innovation and trust. Based on the analyses, five propositions and future research directions are proposed.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Trust , Hospitals , Humans , Social Networking
3.
Vaccine ; 40(14): 2191-2201, 2022 03 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757916

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic poses unprecedented risks to the well-being of Americans. To control the pandemic, a sufficient proportion of the population needs to be vaccinated promptly. Despite the proven efficacy and widespread availability, vaccine distribution and administration rates remain low. Thus, it is important to understand the public behavior of COVID-19 vaccination. This study aims to identify determinants at multiple levels that promote or inhibit one's vaccine uptake. We combine individual-level data from a national survey conducted in the summer of 2021 with corresponding state-level indicators. Findings of multilevel logistic regression show that political orientation, social network, and economic recovery altogether have significant influence. We articulate that individual decision to take the vaccine are a function of their personal characteristics and are also rooted in their home state's political, public health, and economic contexts. These findings contribute to the literature and have policy implications. Knowledge of the profiles among people who take/refuse the vaccine provides essential information to leverage certain factors and maximize vaccine uptake to mitigate the pandemic's devastating impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Social Networking , United States , Vaccination
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22055, 2021 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758325

ABSTRACT

THE AIMS: (i) analyze connectivity between subgroups of university students, (ii) assess which bridges of relational contacts are essential for connecting or disconnecting subgroups and (iii) to explore the similarities between the attributes of the subgroup nodes in relation to the pandemic context. During the COVID-19 pandemic, young university students have experienced significant changes in their relationships, especially in the halls of residence. Previous research has shown the importance of relationship structure in contagion processes. However, there is a lack of studies in the university setting, where students live closely together. The case study methodology was applied to carry out a descriptive study. The participation consisted of 43 university students living in the same hall of residence. Social network analysis has been applied for data analysis. Factions and Girvan-Newman algorithms have been applied to detect the existing cohesive subgroups. The UCINET tool was used for the calculation of the SNA measure. A visualization of the global network will be carried out using Gephi software. After applying the Girvan-Newman and Factions, in both cases it was found that the best division into subgroups was the one that divided the network into 4 subgroups. There is high degree of cohesion within the subgroups and a low cohesion between them. The relationship between subgroup membership and gender was significant. The degree of COVID-19 infection is related to the degree of clustering between the students. College students form subgroups in their residence. Social network analysis facilitates an understanding of structural behavior during the pandemic. The study provides evidence on the importance of gender, race and the building where they live in creating network structures that favor, or not, contagion during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Network Analysis , Social Networking , Female , Housing , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Students , Universities
5.
BMC Med Ethics ; 23(1): 21, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736415

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the pandemic time, many low- and middle-income countries are experiencing restricted access to COVID-19 vaccines. Access to imported vaccines or ways to produce them locally became the principal source of hope for these countries. But developing a strategy for success in obtaining and allocating vaccines was not easy task. The governments in those countries have faced the difficult decision whether to accept or reject offers of vaccine diplomacy, weighing the price and availability of COVID-19 vaccines against the concerns over their efficacy and safety. We aimed to analyze public opinion regarding the governmental strategies to obtain COVID-19 vaccines in three Central Asian countries, focusing particularly on possible ethical issues. METHODS: We searched for opinions expressed either in Russian or in the respective national languages. We provided data on the debate within three countries, drawn from social media postings and other sources. The opinion data was not restricted by source and time. This allowed collecting a wide range of possible opinions that could be expressed regarding COVID-19 vaccine supply and human participation in the vaccine trial. We recognized ethical issues and possible questions concerning different ethical frameworks. We also considered scientific data and other information, in the process of reasoning. RESULTS: As a result, public views on their respective government policies on COVID-19 vaccine supply ranged from strongly negative to slightly positive. We extracted the most important issues from public debates, for our analysis. The first issue involved trade-offs between quantity, speed, price, freedom, efficacy, and safety in the vaccines. The second set of issues arose in connection with the request to site a randomized trial in one of the countries (Uzbekistan). After considering additional evidence, we weighed individual and public risks against the benefits to make specific judgements concerning every issue. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that our analysis would be a helpful example of solving ethical issues that can arise concerning COVID-19 vaccine supply around the world. The public view can be highly critical, helping to spot such issues. An ignoring this view can lead to major problems, which in turn, can become a serious obstacle for the vaccine coverage and epidemics' control in the countries and regions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ethical Analysis , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704605

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted physical activity, particularly among women. Limited research has explored how social network support may explain gender-based variations in physical activity during COVID-19. The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating role of social networks in the association between gender and physical activity during a pandemic. This cross-sectional survey assessed whether social network characteristics (i.e., in-person social network size, frequency of in-person social network interactions, and online friend network size) mediate the relationship between gender and either past-week or past-year physical activity. Multiple mediation analyses were conducted to determine the indirect effect of gender on physical activity through social networks. Among 205 participants, women (n = 129) were significantly less physically active (ß = -73.82; p = 0.02) than men (n = 76) and reported significantly more Facebook friends (ß = 0.30; p < 0.001) than men, which was inversely associated with past-week physical activity (ß = -64.49; p = 0.03). Additionally, the indirect effect of gender on past-week physical activity through Facebook friends was significant (ß = -19.13; 95% CI [-40.45, -2.09]). Findings suggest that social media sites such as Facebook could be used to encourage physical activity among women during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
7.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263746, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690712

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy is currently recognized by the WHO as a major threat to global health. Recently, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a growing interest in the role of social media in the propagation of false information and fringe narratives regarding vaccination. Using a sample of approximately 60 billion tweets, we conduct a large-scale analysis of the vaccine discourse on Twitter. We use methods from deep learning and transfer learning to estimate the vaccine sentiments expressed in tweets, then categorize individual-level user attitude towards vaccines. Drawing on an interaction graph representing mutual interactions between users, we analyze the interplay between vaccine stances, interaction network, and the information sources shared by users in vaccine-related contexts. We find that strongly anti-vaccine users frequently share content from sources of a commercial nature; typically sources which sell alternative health products for profit. An interesting aspect of this finding is that concerns regarding commercial conflicts of interests are often cited as one of the major factors in vaccine hesitancy. Further, we show that the debate is highly polarized, in the sense that users with similar stances on vaccination interact preferentially with one another. Extending this insight, we provide evidence of an epistemic echo chamber effect, where users are exposed to highly dissimilar sources of vaccine information, depending the vaccination stance of their contacts. Our findings highlight the importance of understanding and addressing vaccine mis- and dis-information in the context in which they are disseminated in social networks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Social Media , Global Health , Humans , Social Networking
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690267

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has placed today's society in an unprecedented scenario. During Portugal's first home confinement period (March-July 2020), the online-based "COVID-19 in Trials and Tribulations" project was implemented to support families with school-aged children. The project was grounded on the self-regulation framework and delivered through Facebook® and Instagram® pages. Being responsive to ongoing developments of the pandemic, activities were conveyed in two phases. Phase 1 occurred during lockdown (school was suspended). Phase 2 occurred while students were enrolled in at-distance (online) school. The present study aimed to examine the reach of the project, while examining the content and format of delivery that generated the most engagement among the users (4500 Facebook® effective followers; 1200 Instagram® effective followers) during the confinement period. Results showed that, at the individual page level, Facebook® had higher reach indicators compared to Instagram®, except for video. At the Facebook® post level, followers and users showed more engagement with the page prior to the at-distance schooling phase; however, videos still generated engagement (p = 0.002). Both the post type (p < 0.01) and frequency (p < 0.001) of publication were suggested to be good predictors of engagement. The information gathered will help design and inform future interventions that may be implemented as new lockdowns are set in place.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self-Control , Social Media , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690254

ABSTRACT

Scientific literature presents young people as a vulnerable group at risk of poverty and social exclusion. One of the elements that have the most significant impact on reducing their vulnerability is promoting education. Little is known about how social networks can promote the education of young people. To address this, the present study aims to analyse how social networks, specifically Instagram, which is one of the most used by young people, has promoted, among other aspects, the scientific education of young people during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study analyses 5000 education-related Instagram posts made during the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2021) European research project ALLINTERACT. We have analysed those posts that show, on the one hand, how citizens benefit from scientific research and, on the other hand, citizens' awareness of the impact of scientific research. Through the analysis of the posts, it has been observed how Instagram has been a social network that has provided information and scientific advances in various branches of knowledge, created knowledge networks, and provided a channel for information about the pandemic. Through the analysis of the 5000 posts, it is evident how Instagram has provided spaces for scientific learning, fostering access to scientific education for young people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
10.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(7): 238-242, 2022 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689717

ABSTRACT

On December 2, 2021, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) notified CDC of a COVID-19 case caused by sequence-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant in a Minnesota resident (patient A), the first such case identified in the state and one of the earliest identified in the United States. Patient A had attended a large indoor convention in New York, New York with approximately 53,000 attendees from 52 U.S jurisdictions and 30 foreign countries during November 19-21, 2021, and had close contact† during 5 days with 29 fellow attendees. The convention required attendees to have received ≥1 COVID-19 vaccine dose and enforced mask-use while indoors. On November 22, these close contact attendees were directly and immediately notified by patient A of their exposure to SARS-CoV-2, and they sought testing over the next few days while quarantined or isolated. As part of the larger investigation into SARS-CoV-2 transmission at the convention, a subinvestigation was conducted during December by CDC, MDH, and respective state and local health departments to characterize the epidemiology of Omicron variant infection among this group of close contacts and determine the extent of secondary household transmission. Among 30 convention attendees that included patient A (the index patient) and the 29 other close contacts, 23 were interviewed, among whom all were fully vaccinated, including 11 (48%) who had received a booster dose; all 23 sought testing, and 16 (70%) received a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result. Fewer attendees who had received a booster dose before the convention received a positive test result (six of 11) compared with those who had not received a booster dose (10 of 12). The 16 attendees with positive test results had a total of 20 household contacts, 18 of whom sought testing after exposure; six received a positive test result for SARS-CoV-2. None of the persons with positive test results was hospitalized or died. There was limited convention-associated transmission identified outside of this cluster; the larger investigation included cases of both SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) and Omicron, and all Omicron cases were associated with this group (1). Data from this investigation reinforces the importance of COVID-19 booster doses in combination with early notification and other multicomponent prevention measures to limit transmission and prevent severe illness from Omicron and other SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Contact Tracing/methods , Disease Outbreaks , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Male , New York City/epidemiology , Social Networking , United States/epidemiology
12.
Soins ; 67(862): 39-41, 2022.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671160

ABSTRACT

The various lockdowns linked to the Covid-19 epidemic have modified the use of communication tools, the Internet and social networks. In the context of the walk-in clinic or the child psychiatric evaluation interviews conducted at the Maison des adolescents of the Cochin Hospital in Paris, families were able to discuss the difficulties arising from this new use. Certain transgenerational, cultural and usual misunderstandings were discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Paris , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
14.
Am J Health Promot ; 36(3): 458-471, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650207

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To examine the feasibility and acceptability of a social network weight loss intervention delivered by lay health promoters (HPs) to immigrant populations. DESIGN: Single-arm, non-randomized, pilot study of a social network weight loss intervention developed by a community-based participatory research partnership and delivered by HPs. SETTING: Community-based setting in Southeastern Minnesota, United States. SAMPLE: Somali and Hispanic immigrants to the United States: 4 social networks of adults (2 Hispanic and 2 Somali) with 39 network participants. INTERVENTION: Twelve-week behavioral weight loss intervention delivered by HPs (4 weeks in-person and then 8 weeks virtual). MEASURES: Feasibility was assessed by recruitment and retention rates. Acceptability was assessed by surveys and focus groups with HPs and participants. Behavioral measures included servings of fruits and vegetables, drinking soda, and physical activity. Physiologic measures included weight, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. ANALYSIS: Paired t-tests of pre- to post-intervention changes at the end of 12 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: Recruitment was feasible and post-intervention was 100%. Participants highly rated the intervention on satisfaction, motivation, and confidence to eat a healthy diet, be physically active, and lose weight. Participants were motivated by group social support and cohesion of their social networks. On average, participants lost weight (91.6 ± 15.9 to 89.7 ± 16.6 kg, P < .0001), lowered their systolic blood pressure (133.9±16.9 to 127.2 ± 15.8 mm Hg; P < .001), lowered their diastolic blood pressure (81 ± 9.5 to 75.8 ± 9.6 mm Hg; P < .0001), had more servings of vegetables per day (1.9 ± 1.2 to 2.6 ± 1.4; P < .001), and increased their physical activity (2690 ± 3231 to 6595 ± 7322 MET-minutes per week; P = .02). CONCLUSION: This pilot study of 2 immigrant communities who participated in a peer-led weight loss social network intervention delivered during the COVID-19 pandemic demonstrated high feasibility and acceptability. Participants lost weight, improved their health status, and improved their health behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emigrants and Immigrants , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking , United States , Weight Loss
15.
J Relig Health ; 61(1): 722-740, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636109

ABSTRACT

A significant body of research supports the relationship between religious attendance, objective and subjective social networks characteristics, and mental well-being. This trajectory may be particularly important in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. Thus, the current study examined the relationship between religious attendance, social network characteristics, loneliness, and mental well-being in a sample of 564 young adults (aged 18-35 years) soon after the first COVID-19-related restrictions were imposed in Poland. In line with previous findings, both frequent (FAs) and infrequent religious attenders (IAs) reported more people in their social networks compared to non-attenders (NAs). Further analysis revealed full mediation of religious attendance (FAs vs. NAs) via social network size on loneliness and mental well-being. This pattern of results was still observed after the exclusion of worship-based affiliates from the social network score. A follow-up survey carried out one year later (N = 94) showed that all three groups of participants (FAs, IAs, and NAs) reported increased loneliness and decreased mental well-being. Taken together, these findings show that the influence of religious attendance on social functioning cannot be attributed solely to congregational relationships.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Loneliness , Pandemics , Poland , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Social Networking , Young Adult
16.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(2)2022 Jan 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634825

ABSTRACT

Future social networks will rely heavily on sensing data collected from users' mobile and wearable devices. A crucial component of such sensing will be the full or partial access to user's location data, in order to enable various location-based and proximity-detection-based services. A timely example of such applications is the digital contact tracing in the context of infectious-disease control and management. Other proximity-detection-based applications include social networking, finding nearby friends, optimized shopping, or finding fast a point-of-interest in a commuting hall. Location information can enable a myriad of new services, among which we have proximity-detection services. Addressing efficiently the location privacy threats remains a major challenge in proximity-detection architectures. In this paper, we propose a location-perturbation mechanism in multi-floor buildings which highly protects the user location, while preserving very good proximity-detection capabilities. The proposed mechanism relies on the assumption that the users have full control of their location information and are able to get some floor-map information when entering a building of interest from a remote service provider. In addition, we assume that the devices own the functionality to adjust to the desired level of accuracy at which the users disclose their location to the service provider. Detailed simulation-based results are provided, based on multi-floor building scenarios with hotspot regions, and the tradeoff between privacy and utility is thoroughly investigated.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Privacy , Contact Tracing , Social Networking
18.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(12): 5048-5062, 2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608704

ABSTRACT

The factors that lead to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine hesitancy among health-care workers (HCWs) are unclear. We aimed to identify the factors that influence HCWs' hesitancy, especially the influence of their social network. Using an online platform, we surveyed HCWs in Chongqing, China, in January 2021 to understand the factors that influence the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among HCWs. Proportional allocation stratified sampling method was used to recruit respondents. Multivariable logistic regression and social network analysis (SNA) were used to analyze the influence factors. A total of 5247 HCWs were included and 23.3% of them were vaccine-hesitant. Participants were more hesitant if they had chronic diseases (OR = 1.411, 95% CI: 1.146-1.738), worked in tertiary hospitals (OR = 1.546, 95% CI: 1.231-1.942), and reported a history of vaccine hesitancy (OR = 1.637, 95% CI: 1.395-1.920) and refusal toward other vaccines (OR = 2.433, 95% CI: 2.067-2.863). The participants with a social network to communicate COVID-19 immunization were less hesitant (OR = 0.850, 95% CI: 0.728-0.993). Several influential members with social networks were found in SNA. Most of these influential members in the networks were department leaders who were willing to get COVID-19 vaccines (P < .05). Hesitant subgroups among Chinese HCWs were linked to the lack of a social network to communicate COVID-19 immunization. Our findings may lead to tailored interventions to enhance COVID-19 vaccine uptake among HCWs by targeting key members in social network.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
19.
Front Public Health ; 9: 772933, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555109

ABSTRACT

While studies exploring COVID-19 and its global influence have begun, social networks and support among older adults in low-and middle-income countries, such as Ghana have been inadequate despite its enormous relevance. Thus, the study presents the voices of older adults in Jamestown, Accra and their social networks during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ghana. Using a phenomenological approach, data were collected from 15 older adults through in-depth interviews on older adults' social network experiences during COVID-19 pandemic situation. Older adults generally struggled to maintain connections with their family members, friends, neighbors, and the community, especially during the lockdown. They ascribed their limited interaction to COVID-19 preventive measures, such as social distancing and the limitation of face-to-face meetings imposed by the government. Loneliness, stress, and depression are also linked to the breakdown of social networks. The findings provide a deeper understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on older adults' quality of life. It emerged that the Ghanaian society could reconsider the professional services of gerontologists, social workers, community outreach workers, and philanthropists in mitigating loneliness, stress, and depression among older adults in current and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Communicable Disease Control , Ghana/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking , Social Support
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551598

ABSTRACT

Latinx seasonal farmworkers are essential workers and are at elevated risk for SARS-CoV-2 in the United States. Risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 are unique to this population and include crowded living conditions, isolated social networks, and exploitative working environments. The circumstances and cultural values of Latinx seasonal farmworkers pose a unique challenge to public health authorities working to contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2. This community is in dire need of urgent public health research to identify opportunities to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission: social network methods could be the solution. Using previously collected and new information provided by a team of experts, this commentary provides a brief description of Latinx seasonal farmworker disparities that affect tracking and treating SARS-CoV-2 in this important group, the challenges introduced by SARS-CoV-2, and how social network approaches learned from other infectious disease prevention strategies can address these disparities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Farmers , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Social Networking , United States
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL