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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834793

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way many people live. To assess its impact on sleep quality and quantity, blue light exposure, and the mental health of Polish university students, a cross-sectional survey was conducted. Almost half of the participants were medical students (47.62%; n = 630). The majority of students were suffering from insomnia (58.13%, n = 769). Almost every third student was sleeping less than 7 h a day (30.39%, n = 402). Our study showed that a short sleep duration correlates with poorer mental health outcomes. Respondents who declared sadness and depression were more likely to suffer from insomnia (OR = 5.6997, 95% CI: 4.3641-7.4441). Difficulty with tasks was also more likely to co-occur with insomnia (OR = 5.4723, 95% CI: 4.3007 to 6.9630). The results of this study showed that the COVID-19 pandemic contributed to the deterioration of sleep quality and quantity as well as the psychological well-being of Polish students. It is important to take steps to promote proper sleeping habits to alleviate the risk of mental health disorders in this group of people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology , Universities
3.
J Community Psychol ; 50(1): 285-301, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797868

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, universities were forced to adopt a remote learning model, which introduced a number of stressors into college students' everyday life and study habits. The current study investigates if students' study-related stress increased after the pandemic's onset and how individual and contextual factors moderate this potential stress increase. Longitudinal survey data about students' stress levels and self-efficacy in self-regulation were collected before and after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic at a public university (N = 274). Regression analysis results show an overall increase in study-related stress levels after the onset of the pandemic. Students with self-efficacy in self-regulation reported lower stress increases; students with higher mental health impairment and limited time for coursework reported larger stress increases. To address students' stress levels and strengthen coping resources, universities should consider providing students with resources to improve their self-regulation and time-management skills.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Universities
4.
BMC Pediatr ; 21(1): 413, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793969

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lower respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in children younger than 5 years. Even if the burden of lower respiratory infections in children under 5 years old had decreased dramatically in the last 10 years, it is still the main cause of morbidity and mortality in children under-5 years old in developing countries, so the aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of lower respiratory tract infections and associated factors among under-five children visiting Wolaita Sodo University Teaching and Referral Hospital. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1st to 30th April 2019, among under-five child/mother or caretaker pairs visiting Wolaita Sodo University Teaching and Referral Hospital. Child/mother or caretaker pairs who visits outpatient department for curative care service or follow up were recruited for the study. Data were collected using a semi-structured pre-tested interviewer-guided questionnaire. Epi-info (version 7.1.2.0) was used for data entry, and Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20 was used for analysis. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, crude and adjusted odds ratios with their 95 % confidence intervals was computed. Finally, a p-value ≤ 0.05 was used to identify variables that had a significant association with acute lower respiratory infection. RESULT: A total of 414 child/mother or caretaker pairs were recruited for the study. The magnitude of acute lower respiratory infections among under-five children was 40.3 % (95 % CI: 35.7- 44.9 %). Unvaccinated children (AOR: 2, 95 % CI, (1.27-3.16)), non-exclusive/replacement feeding (AOR: 1.85, 95 % CI, (1.18-2.91)), households mainly used unclean fuel for cooking (AOR: 2.12, 95 % CI, (1.07-4.19)), absence of separate kitchen (AOR: 1.7, 95 % CI, (1.09-2.65)), and absence of window in the kitchen room (AOR: 1.69, 95 % CI, (1.07-2.68)) showed significant association with acute lower respiratory infection. CONCLUSIONS: The magnitude of acute lower respiratory tract infections among under-five children visiting outpatient department was 40.3 %. Unvaccinated children, non-exclusive/replacement feeding, using unclean fuel for cooking, absence of a separate kitchen, and absence of window in the kitchen showed significant association with acute lower respiratory infection. Therefore, special attention should be given to the environmental sanitation and family health components of health extension packages.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Tract Infections , Universities , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology
5.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263388, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793530

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, universities immediately responded to protect students' lives by implementing e-learning in order to stop the spread of the communicable disease within the academic population. This study aimed to describe iranian nursing students' experiences of e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The current study used a qualitative descriptive study. Ten nursing undergraduate students from a single Iranian university identified using purposive sampling methods. Face-to-face semi-structured interview conducted from May to July 2021 and analyzed through thematic analysis. Lincoln and Goba criteria were used to obtain data validity and reliability. RESULTS: Four themes emerged including"novelty of e-learning","advantages of e-learning", "disadvantages of e-learning"and"passage of time and the desire to return to face education". Participants evaluated e-learning as a novel method without proper infrastructure, it was initially confusing but became the new normal as their knowledge of the way to use it improved. Advantages included self-centered flexible learning and reduction in their concerns experienced with face-to-face learning. Disadvantages including changing the way they interact with teachers, decreasing interactions with classmates, problems with education files, superficial learning, hardware problems, family members' perceptions of the student role, interference of home affairs with e-learning, cheating on exams and assignments and being far away from the clinical context. CONCLUSION: The findings revealed that e-learning has been introduced as a new method for the current research participants and despite the perceived benefits, these students believed that e-learning could supplement face education but not replace it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Education, Nursing/methods , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/trends , Female , Humans , Iran , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Universities
6.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263999, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793522

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented experience of national lockdowns and uncertainty of academic career due to the COVID-19 pandemic has multifaceted impacts on mental health among university students worldwide. This study determined its impact on depression and anxiety level, and associated risk factors among engineering students studying at College of Science and Technology (CST), Phuentsholing, Bhutan during the first lockdown in the country. Self-reported depression and anxiety levels were assessed using Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) respectively. Data was collected using an e-questionnaire link generated in Google form and the link was shared with students via the student's official email group. A total of 278 students (response rate, 26.9%) completed the questionnaire. The majority of respondents were male (69.8%) and were aged from 18 to 30 (Mean: 21.7 ±SD 2.07) years. The prevalence of self-reported moderate to severe depression and anxiety were 44.2% (95% CI, 38.5-49.6) and 27.3% (95% CI, 22.3-32.4) respectively. Participants having their family members as frontline workers reported a significantly higher level of anxiety (χ2 = 4.85, p = 0.028). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, students who were academically lagging showed a higher risk of depression (AOR = 5.36, 95% CI = 2.86-10.04) and anxiety (AOR = 3.83, 95%CI = 1.86-7.88) as compared to students who were not academically behind. A high percentage of depression and anxiety was reported by students of CST during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings from the study highlight the importance of adopting appropriate online-based teaching and learning methods to ensure timely academic and professional achievements. Moreover, the relevant stakeholders should put health system strategies in place to provide psychological support to university students during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/complications , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Bhutan/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
7.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266276, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789183

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a growing interest in online information about coronavirus worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the digital health literacy (DHL) level, information-seeking behaviour, and satisfaction of information on COVID-19 among East and South-East Asia university students. This cross-sectional web-based study was conducted between April to June 2020 by recruiting students from universities in China, Malaysia, and the Philippines. University students who have Internet access were invited to participate in the study. Items on sociodemographic variables, DHL, information-seeking behaviour, and information satisfaction were included in the questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were conducted. A total of 5302 university students responded to the survey. The overall mean score across the four DHL subscales was 2.89 (SD: 0.42). Search engines (e.g., Google, Bing, Yahoo) (92.0%) and social media (88.4%) were highly utilized by the students, whereas Websites of doctors or health insurance companies were of lower utilization (64.7%). Across the domains (i.e., adding self-generated content, determining relevance, evaluating reliability, and protecting privacy) higher DHL was positively associated with higher usage of trustworthy resources. Providing online information on COVID-19 at official university websites and conducting health talks or web-based information dissemination about the strategies for mental health challenges during pandemic could be beneficial to the students. Strengthening DHL among university students will enhance their critical thinking and evaluation of online resources, which could direct them to the quality and trustworthy information sources on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
8.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 19(4): 517-524, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785228

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic revealed long-standing, unaddressed fissures in our systems, including dramatic gender inequities in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields. Women have disproportionately carried the burden of childcare and other caregiving responsibilities during the pandemic, and there are strong indications that the pandemic will likely exacerbate preexisting disparities in the pipeline of women in STEMM and in leadership positions. Based on a literature review, our own experiences, and the experiences of our colleagues, we review promising strategies that have been implemented by funding bodies, journals, professional societies, and colleges/universities as well as additional strategies that might be helpful for these entities to implement to move forward with policies in place that address gender inequities and rebuild our institutional systems better. At this moment in time, institutions should collect data on metrics such as recruitment, retention, tenure/promotion, funding, professional society membership, awards/honors, and scientific publishing. These data will be essential in determining the impact of policies on women in STEMM to ensure they are having the intended effect as well as what future actions might be necessary in an iterative process.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Technology , Female , Humans , Leadership , Mathematics , Universities
9.
Front Public Health ; 10: 813328, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785437

ABSTRACT

Background: According to the literature, the conditions of studying and living as well as the psychological, social and health behavior-related variables, which were strongly related to pharmacological neuroenhancement (PN) before the pandemic, significantly changed during the pandemic. For this reason, it is expected that the prevalence of PN among university students is higher during the pandemic compared to before the pandemic. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate and compare the prevalence of PN among university students before and during the COVID-19-pandemic. Methods: Three online surveys assessing the 12-month prevalence of PN were conducted among university students at the University of Mainz, Germany. The first survey took place in summer term 2019 (before the pandemic), the second in summer term 2020 (during the first German lockdown), and the third in summer term 2021 (after the second German lockdown). Pearson's chi-square test was used to test whether the 12-month prevalence of PN differed significantly between the three surveys. Results: The 12-month prevalence of PN was 10.4% in 2019, 11.3% in 2020, and 8.0% in 2021. Chi-square tests revealed no statistical difference in the prevalence of PN between 2019 and 2020. Overall, the use of PN was lower in 2021 compared to 2019 (p < 0.0001) as well as in comparison to 2020 (p = 0.001). Only the use of cannabis slightly increased from 2019 to 2020 (7.1 vs. 8.3%) and decreased in 2021 (5.4%). At all three time points, cannabis was the most commonly used substance for the purpose of PN. Consequently, the results suggest that the prevalence of PN was highly intertwined with the prevalence of cannabis use for PN. Discussion: The decrease in the prevalence of PN of around three percentage points in 2021 compared to the previous years was a surprising finding. It may be mainly due to the decrease in the prevalence of cannabis for the purpose of PN. However, the fairly high prevalence of PN of around 8% in 2021 is still an important finding that demonstrates that there is still an urgent need for prevention initiatives among university students to combat the use of PN.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cannabis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Students/psychology , Universities
10.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266686, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785199

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Students generally struggle to build a good career after their graduation in developing countries like Bangladesh. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, such struggle increased and faced with stress and depression. We aimed to inquire about the amplitude of depression and stress among university students during the COVID-19 pandemic regarding their future careers and to identify the factors associated with this depression and stress. METHODS: A total of 516 students at various universities participated in this cross-sectional survey. From October 2020 to February 2021, data was collected through an online survey. An e-questionnaire with socio-demographic, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) questions was created using Google Forms and distributed via Facebook, WhatsApp, and other social media platforms. The universities included into the sample were selected randomly from eight divisions of Bangladesh. Descriptive statistics and Pearson chi-square tests were carried out and the association between the risk factors and the outcome (e.g. depression and stress) was assessed by the odds ratio (OR) including 95% confidence interval (CI) obtained from the binary logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among 516 participants, 380 (73.6%) were male and 136 (26.4%) were female. Around 414 (80.2%) participants had mild to severe depression and 399 (77.3%) reported having low to moderately perceived stress. Female students were 2.1 (95% CI: 1.21-3.76) times more depressed and 3.6 (95% CI: 1.87-6.76) times more stressed than the counterpart. Students, who think delaying graduation due to COVID-19 will reduce the chance of getting a job, were 1.72 (95% CI: 1.07-2.76) times more depressed. Respondents, whose department offers any internship were 36% less depressed (p = 0.053), while skilled students were 46% less stressed though it was not statistically significant (p = 0.43). CONCLUSION: According to our findings, there is an increasing prevalence of depression and stress among students, particularly among female students and those who do not receive job-related facilities from their institutions or who are unskilled. Universities can provide mental health programs and strive to have enough space for students to participate in internships. In addition, the government and educational institutions should work together to address the growing challenge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Universities
11.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e057404, 2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784825

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess COVID-19 preventive behaviours and their associated factors among university students. METHODS: An institution-based cross-sectional study was employed among 405 university students and the study participants were chosen using a stratified simple random selection procedure. A pretested self-administered questionnaire was used to assess participants' perception of and preventive behaviour towards COVID-19. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was employed to identify factors associated with COVID-19 preventive behaviour. RESULT: A total of 405 students participated in this study with a response rate of 97.4%. The mean age of the participants was 23.6 (SD ±2.4, range 19-30) years. Two hundred and twenty of the participants (45.7% with 95% CI 41.0% to 51.0%) had good preventive behaviour towards COVID-19. COVID-19 preventive behaviour was significantly associated with age (adjusted OR (AOR)=1.1, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.2), female sex (AOR=1.6, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.60), knowing anyone infected with COVID-19 (AOR=4.05, 95% CI 1.9 to 8.8), participants who had high perceived susceptibility (AOR=2.14, 95% CI 1.44 to 3.35) and participants who were enrolled in health programmes (AOR=4.23, 95% CI 2.6 to 7.0). CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION: The overall COVID-19 preventive behaviour among university students is unsatisfactory. Students' COVID-19 preventive behaviour was influenced by age, sex, knowing a COVID-19 infected person, perceived susceptibility and the sort of programme in which they had enrolled. The findings revealed that health communication interventions aimed at changing people's perceptions of COVID-19 and related prevention strategies are urgently needed to improve this population's COVID-19 preventive behaviour.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Perception , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785636

ABSTRACT

Research suggests a disparity in the prevalence of dementia, with Black older adults having double the risk compared to their White counterparts. African immigrants are a fast-growing segment of the U.S. Black population, but the dementia care needs and resources of this population are not fully understood. In this paper, we describe the process of working collaboratively with a community partner and project advisory board to conduct a culturally informed project. Specifically, we describe the process of developing culturally informed instruments to collect data on dementia care needs and resources among African immigrants. Working together with a diverse project advisory board, a guide was developed and used to conduct community conversations about experiences with dementia/memory loss. Transcripts from six conversations with 24 total participants were transcribed and analyzed thematically by two independent coders in Nvivo. These qualitative findings were used to inform the development of a survey for quantitative data collection that is currently ongoing. Themes (e.g., cultural attitudes, challenges, and current resources) from the community conversations that informed the survey are described briefly. Despite the challenges of conducting research during a global pandemic, having trusting relationships with a partnering community organization and project advisory board facilitated the successful development of instruments to conduct preliminary dementia care research in an underserved population. We anticipate that survey results will inform interventions that increase education, outreach, and access to dementia care and caregiving resources for this population. It may serve as a model for community-university partnerships for similar public health efforts in dementia as well as other chronic disease contexts.


Subject(s)
Dementia , Emigrants and Immigrants , Aged , Dementia/epidemiology , Humans , Universities , Vulnerable Populations
13.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(4): 217-220, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780112

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic created significant disruption in higher education, especially in health science colleges where in-person and hands-on patient-facing learning environments are essential. Student monitoring and follow-up was an essential aspect of in-person learning for the fall 2020 semester. METHOD: Senior leaders and faculty in a college of nursing developed and implemented an innovative college-based COVID-19 management system to ensure real-time response to prolonged pandemic-related student absences. RESULTS: Decisions made from this management system allowed leaders within the college to implement programmatic changes to ensure student and faculty well-being. Furthermore, the COVID-19 management system allowed for close student follow-up through phone calls with a faculty member to ensure student well-being. CONCLUSION: Monitoring helped ensure appropriate physical and mental health services were accessible to students undergoing quarantine or self-isolation while also fostering positive student satisfaction throughout their prolonged absences. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(4):217-220.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Learning , Pandemics , Universities
14.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266612, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779774

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: University students' psychological health is linked to their academic satisfaction. This study aimed to investigate students' psychological health and academic satisfaction in the context of COVID-19 and academic year-end stress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Standardized self-filled scales for anxiety, depression, stress, psychological well-being, academic satisfaction (subjective assessment of students' quality of life in their educational setting), and an ad-hoc scale for stress on the learning experience due to COVID-19 were used in this cross-sectional study. Participants were first- to third-year students of eight different health-related tracks in Geneva, Switzerland. Descriptive statistics and hierarchical regression analyses were applied. RESULTS: In June 2020, out of 2835 invited students, 433 (15%) completed the survey. Academic satisfaction was a stronger mental health predictor than COVID-19 stress on the learning experience, which mainly predicted stress and anxiety. Lower academic satisfaction scores were significantly associated with stress (ß = -0.53, p < 0.001), depression (ß = -0.26, p < 0.001), anxiety (ß = -0.20, p < 0.001), while higher scores with psychological well-being (ß = 0.48, p < 0.001). Identifying as female was strongly associated with anxiety and stress but not with depression or psychological well-being. Lower age was associated with stress only. The nature of the academic training had a lesser impact on mental health and the academic year had no impact. CONCLUSIONS: Academic satisfaction plays a more substantial role than COVID-19 stress on the learning experience in predicting students' overall mental health status. Training institutions should address the underlying factors that can enhance students' academic satisfaction, especially during the COVID-19 period, in addition to ensuring that they have a continuous and adequate learning experience, as well as access to psychosocial services that help them cope with mental distress and enhance their psychological well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Switzerland/epidemiology , Universities
15.
BMC Res Notes ; 15(1): 131, 2022 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779669

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The present study investigates if symptoms of COVID-19 contagion in different social contexts (cohabitants, family, acquaintances, and others) are associated with university students' own self-reported symptoms of COVID-19 contagion, mental health, and study capacity. This was investigated by a cross-sectional survey administrated in Sweden during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, at the time when universities were locked down to limit viral spread and contagion. RESULTS: Mild to moderate symptoms of COVID-19 in cohabitants and family members were associated with student's self-reported symptoms of contagion, while no associations could be seen in relation to mental health and study capacity. Symptoms of COVID-19 contagion in acquaintances and others were not associated with students' self-reported symptoms, nor with their mental health and study capacity. To conclude, during the initial lockdown of universities students' self-reported symptoms of contagion were mainly associated with cohabitants and family members, while symptoms of contagion in different social contexts were not associated with mental health and study capacity. Findings suggest that lockdown of universities may have contributed to limiting infection pathways, while still allowing students to focus on their studies despite significant contagion among others known to the student.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Social Environment , Students/psychology , Sweden/epidemiology , Universities
16.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 658, 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigates university students' digital health literacy and web-based information-seeking behaviours during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in England. It compares undergraduate and postgraduate students in non-health related subjects with health care students, many of whom were preparing for, or working in, frontline roles. The survey was conducted as part of a wider study by the COVID-HL research consortium. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among n = 691 university students aged ≥18 years from 25 universities across England using an adapted digital survey developed by COVID-HL. Data were collected regarding sociodemographic characteristics and specific measures drawn from the Future Anxiety Scale and the Digital Health Literacy Instrument (DHLI). These had been adapted for use in an English setting and to the specific context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Other data collected included students' anxiety or worries about the future using the Dark Future Scale as well as behaviours in online information-seeking. Data were analysed using correlations to test for relationships between constructs and also between group comparisons to test for differences between students studying health and non-health related subjects. RESULTS: Across digital health literacy dimensions, there was no significant difference between students studying health-related subjects and other students. Health care students did report greater difficulties in relation to how to behave online. They also relied less on public body sources for information about the pandemic. A significant difference was found between the two student populations in relation to their anxiety about the future with health care students reporting fewer fears about the future. CONCLUSIONS: Although digital health literacy is well developed in university students, a significant proportion of students still face difficulties with evaluating online information which may frustrate public health efforts. This could be addressed by ensuring health students' curriculum in particular encompasses digital health literacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
17.
Front Public Health ; 9: 692461, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775813

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual habits, and behavior among students of medical and nonmedical students in Serbia. Methodology: The cross-sectional study of 1,273 university students of four undergraduate institutions in Serbia, two of medical and two of nonmedical orientation. A standardized questionnaire, prepared in line with the questionnaire of the European health research-the second wave (European Health Interview Survey-EHIS wave 2), according to defined internationally accepted indicators, was used as a survey instrument. Results: Statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) between medical and nonmedical student groups was determined for the following parameters: naming four of five STIs (29.1 vs. 13.4%), knowledge about vaccines against some STIs (26.0 vs. 17.0%), relationship between HPV infection and cervical malignancy (48.2 vs. 16.7%) engaged in the sexual relations (87.9 vs. 76.4%), never used a condom (15.2 vs. 10.4%), underwent gynecological or urological examination (66.7 vs. 44.1%), and tested to one of STIs (10.5 vs. 4.9%). Conclusion: Both student groups have limited knowledge on possible consequences that risky sexual behavior has for reproductive health. Promotion of knowledge about STIs, awareness of all complications, and consequences of these infections certainly affect the reduction of risky behavior.


Subject(s)
Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Cross-Sectional Studies , Habits , Humans , Serbia , Sexual Behavior , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Students , Universities
18.
Ann Ig ; 34(3): 236-247, 2022 Apr 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776574

ABSTRACT

Background: The unprecedented changes in daily-life caused by Covid-19 restrictions had many psycho-logical and adverse effects, not only in sufferers but also in the general population, including university students. To date, little is known about Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms experienced by university students during the peak of Covid-19 in Italy. Thus, the study describes Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders related to the Covid-19 outbreak among Italian university students and identifies the psychological distress risk and protective factors. Study design: A multicentre observational cross-sectional study. Methods: Data collection was involved in a self-reported web questionnaire, using the on-line platform Qualtrics®, in March and April 2020, involving convenience and consecutive sampling of Italians university students in different Italy regions. Results: A sample of 720 Italian university students was enrolled. Data analysis highlighted the leading role of sex, health concerns, and health engagement as negative or positive determinants of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders in Italian university students during the Covid-19 outbreak. In particular, it is very insightful having discovered that health engagement is a protective factor of students' mental health. Conclusions: This is the first study identifying sex, health issues and health commitment as positive or negative determinants of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders symptoms in Italian university students during the Covid-19 epidemic. Accordingly, this new achievement could be the starting point for the development of awareness campaigns for the psychological health of Italian university students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Students , Universities
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776240

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused several changes in society, especially in the educational context, where several learning methodologies and social interactions have been modified significantly. This fact could have had a negative impact on academic stress levels of students and the classroom climate, especially in the university context. The main aim of the present study was to identify changes in academic stress and the perceived classroom climate caused by COVID-19 in a sample of Spanish university students. Academic stress was evaluated trough the Stressor Academic Scale (SAS) and perceived classroom climate employing the Perceived Classroom Responsibility Climate (PCRC) questionnaire. A longitudinal study was conducted. 135 students (97 females and 38 males) from the Gastronomy (n = 31) and Criminology (n = 104) degrees were evaluated before and after the COVID-19 lockdown in Spain. Academic stress levels and perceived classroom climate were analyzed before (Time 1) and after (Time 2) the lockdown declaration. An increase in academic stress was found, especially in the categories regarding Teachers' Methodological Deficiencies, Academic Over-Burden and Beliefs About Performances. Females and final year students suffered higher levels of academic stress. No differences were found between Time 1 and 2 in perceived classroom climate. The obtained results point out a significant increase of academic stress in university students due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain. The implemented educational changes and the uncertainty that resulted from the pandemic could have a significant negative impact on mental health in this population, resulting in higher levels of academic stress, especially in females and final year students. Future studies should analyze the strategies that students are employing to cope with these educational challenges and intervention strategies to promote them in the context of higher education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pandemics , Students , Universities
20.
Front Public Health ; 10: 856167, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776083

ABSTRACT

Background: The Revised Two Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) is used to examine students' study approaches in higher education. The questionnaire is designed to measure two factors: deep and surface approaches. In order to measure these approaches for students in physical education and sport, a new measurement instrument should take into consideration the practical context of this field of education that makes it specific to other fields. Objective: The present study aims (a) to develop and empirical test of a new instrument for measuring the study process in physical education and sports students, and (b) to test psychometric properties of the tool. Methods: Two exploratory and confirmatory samples of physical education students enrolled in a bachelor's degree program in physical education at the High Institute of Physical Education and Sports of Kef-Tunisia, aged 19-26 years, were recruited online among female students (n = 414) and male students (n = 393). The participants filled in Google Form survey including Physical Education-Study Process Questionnaire (PE-SPQ) and the Arabic version of the Revised Study Process Questionnaire-2 Factors (R-SPQ-2F). Results: Exploratory factor analysis showed a suitable four factors solution, which is approved by confirmatory factor analysis indices [χ2 = 466.47, TLI = 0.94, CFI = 0.95; RMSEA = 0.56 IC 90% (0.050-0.062)]. Internal consistency of the PE-SPQ simultaneously checked by McDonald's ω, Cronbach's α and Gutmann's λ6 showed good reliability of the PE-SPQ. Convergent validity examined by Average variance extracted (AVE) was good. The comparison between the AVE root mean square and Pearson correlation coefficients of each factor with his indicators reveals the discriminant validity of the PE-SPQ. Furthermore, Pearson's correlation between the PE-SPQ factors and the R-SPQ-2F establishes the concurrent validity of the new scale. Conclusion: The PE-SPQ scale is valid and reliable and can be used to assess study process factors in physical education students.


Subject(s)
Physical Education and Training , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Tunisia , Universities , Young Adult
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