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1.
Viruses ; 14(7)2022 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917790

ABSTRACT

Community mitigation measures taken owing to the COVID-19 pandemic have caused a decrease in the number of respiratory viruses, including the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), and a delay in their occurrence. HPIV3 was rarely detected as a consequence of monitoring respiratory viral pathogens in Gwangju, Korea, in 2020; however, it resurfaced as a delayed outbreak and peaked in September-October 2021. To understand the genetic characteristics of the reemerging virus, antigenic gene sequences and evolutionary analyses of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes were performed for 129 HPIV3 pathogens prevalent in Gwangju from 2018 to 2021. Unlike the prevalence of various HPIV3 strains in 2018-2019, the prevalence of HPIV3 by strains with reduced diversity was confirmed in 2021. It could be inferred that this decrease in genetic diversity was due to the restriction of inflow from other regions at home and abroad following the community mitigation measures and the spread within the region. The HPIV3 that emerged in 2021 consisted of HN coding regions that were 100% consistent with the sequence identified in Saitama, Japan, in 2018, and F coding regions exhibiting 99.6% homology to a sequence identified in India in 2017, among the ranks reported to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The emergence of a new lineage in a community can lead to a mass outbreak by collapsing the collective immunity of the existing acquired area; therefore, continuous monitoring is necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parainfluenza Virus 3, Human , COVID-19/epidemiology , HN Protein/genetics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Fusion Proteins/genetics
2.
N Engl J Med ; 386(17): 1615-1626, 2022 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815678

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a major cause of illness and death in infants worldwide, could be prevented by vaccination during pregnancy. The efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of a bivalent RSV prefusion F protein-based (RSVpreF) vaccine in pregnant women and their infants are uncertain. METHODS: In a phase 2b trial, we randomly assigned pregnant women, at 24 through 36 weeks' gestation, to receive either 120 or 240 µg of RSVpreF vaccine (with or without aluminum hydroxide) or placebo. The trial included safety end points and immunogenicity end points that, in this interim analysis, included 50% titers of RSV A, B, and combined A/B neutralizing antibodies in maternal serum at delivery and in umbilical-cord blood, as well as maternal-to-infant transplacental transfer ratios. RESULTS: This planned interim analysis included 406 women and 403 infants; 327 women (80.5%) received RSVpreF vaccine. Most postvaccination reactions were mild to moderate; the incidence of local reactions was higher among women who received RSVpreF vaccine containing aluminum hydroxide than among those who received RSVpreF vaccine without aluminum hydroxide. The incidences of adverse events in the women and infants were similar in the vaccine and placebo groups; the type and frequency of these events were consistent with the background incidences among pregnant women and infants. The geometric mean ratios of 50% neutralizing titers between the infants of vaccine recipients and those of placebo recipients ranged from 9.7 to 11.7 among those with RSV A neutralizing antibodies and from 13.6 to 16.8 among those with RSV B neutralizing antibodies. Transplacental neutralizing antibody transfer ratios ranged from 1.41 to 2.10 and were higher with nonaluminum formulations than with aluminum formulations. Across the range of assessed gestational ages, infants of women who were immunized had similar titers in umbilical-cord blood and similar transplacental transfer ratios. CONCLUSIONS: RSVpreF vaccine elicited neutralizing antibody responses with efficient transplacental transfer and without evident safety concerns. (Funded by Pfizer; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04032093.).


Subject(s)
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human , Viral Fusion Proteins , Aluminum Hydroxide/adverse effects , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Female , Humans , Infant , Pregnancy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines/adverse effects , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Vaccination , Viral Fusion Proteins/immunology
3.
Viruses ; 14(4)2022 03 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792421

ABSTRACT

Focusing on the transmembrane domains (TMDs) of viral fusion and channel-forming proteins (VCPs), experimentally available and newly generated peptides in an ideal conformation of the S and E proteins of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and SARS-CoV, gp41 and Vpu, both of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), haemagglutinin and M2 of influenza A, as well as gB of herpes simplex virus (HSV), are embedded in a fully hydrated lipid bilayer and used in multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations. It is aimed to identify differences in the dynamics of the individual TMDs of the two types of viral membrane proteins. The assumption is made that the dynamics of the individual TMDs are decoupled from their extra-membrane domains, and that the mechanics of the TMDs are distinct from each other due to the different mechanism of function of the two types of proteins. The diffusivity coefficient (DC) of the translational and rotational diffusion is decreased in the oligomeric state of the TMDs compared to those values when calculated from simulations in their monomeric state. When comparing the calculations for two different lengths of the TMD, a longer full peptide and a shorter purely TMD stretch, (i) the difference of the calculated DCs begins to level out when the difference exceeds approximately 15 amino acids per peptide chain, and (ii) the channel protein rotational DC is the most affected diffusion parameter. The rotational dynamics of the individual amino acids within the middle section of the TMDs of the fusion peptides remain high upon oligomerization, but decrease for the channel peptides, with an increasing number of monomers forming the oligomeric state, suggesting an entropic penalty on oligomerization for the latter.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ion Channels , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Viral Fusion Proteins , Amino Acids , Humans , Ion Channels/ultrastructure , Peptides/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Fusion Proteins/ultrastructure
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(5)2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736943

ABSTRACT

Rouleaux (stacked clumps) of red blood cells (RBCs) observed in the blood of COVID-19 patients in three studies call attention to the properties of several enveloped virus strains dating back to seminal findings of the 1940s. For COVID-19, key such properties are: (1) SARS-CoV-2 binds to RBCs in vitro and also in the blood of COVID-19 patients; (2) although ACE2 is its target for viral fusion and replication, SARS-CoV-2 initially attaches to sialic acid (SA) terminal moieties on host cell membranes via glycans on its spike protein; (3) certain enveloped viruses express hemagglutinin esterase (HE), an enzyme that releases these glycan-mediated bindings to host cells, which is expressed among betacoronaviruses in the common cold strains but not the virulent strains, SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2 and MERS. The arrangement and chemical composition of the glycans at the 22 N-glycosylation sites of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and those at the sialoglycoprotein coating of RBCs allow exploration of specifics as to how virally induced RBC clumping may form. The in vitro and clinical testing of these possibilities can be sharpened by the incorporation of an existing anti-COVID-19 therapeutic that has been found in silico to competitively bind to multiple glycans on SARS-CoV-2 spike protein.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Erythrocytes/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sialoglycoproteins/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Basigin/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/virology , Glycosylation , Hemagglutination , Hemagglutinins, Viral/metabolism , Humans , N-Acetylneuraminic Acid/metabolism , Polysaccharides/metabolism , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Virus Internalization
5.
J Virol ; 96(3): e0192821, 2022 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691422

ABSTRACT

From 2014 to week 07/2020 the Centre for Health Protection in Hong Kong conducted screening for influenza C virus (ICV). A retrospective analysis of ICV detections to week 26/2019 revealed persistent low-level circulation with outbreaks occurring biennially in the winters of 2015 to 2016 and 2017 to 2018 (R. S. Daniels et al., J Virol 94:e01051-20, 2020, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01051-20). Here, we report on an outbreak occurring in 2019 to 2020, reinforcing the observation of biennial seasonality in Hong Kong. All three outbreaks occurred in similar time frames, were subsequently dwarfed by seasonal epidemics of influenza types A and B, and were caused by similar proportions of C/Kanagawa/1/76 (K)-lineage and C/São Paulo/378/82 S1- and S2-sublineage viruses. Ongoing genetic drift was observed in all genes, with some evidence of amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion (HEF) glycoprotein possibly associated with antigenic drift. A total of 61 ICV genomes covering the three outbreaks were analyzed for reassortment, and 9 different reassortant constellations were identified, 1 K-lineage, 4 S1-sublineage, and 4 S2-sublineage, with 6 of these being identified first in the 2019-1920 outbreak (2 S2-lineage and 4 S1-lineage). The roles that virus interference/enhancement, ICV persistent infection, genome evolution, and reassortment might play in the observed seasonality of ICV in Hong Kong are discussed. IMPORTANCE Influenza C virus (ICV) infection of humans is common, with the great majority of people being infected during childhood, though reinfection can occur throughout life. While infection normally results in "cold-like" symptoms, severe disease cases have been reported in recent years. However, knowledge of ICV is limited due to poor systematic surveillance and an inability to propagate the virus in large amounts in the laboratory. Following recent systematic surveillance in Hong Kong SAR, China, and direct ICV gene sequencing from clinical specimens, a 2-year cycle of disease outbreaks (epidemics) has been identified, with gene mixing playing a significant role in ICV evolution. Studies like those reported here are key to developing an understanding of the impact of influenza C virus infection in humans, notably where comorbidities exist and severe respiratory disease can develop.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/virology , Influenzavirus C/classification , Influenzavirus C/genetics , Reassortant Viruses , Hemagglutinins, Viral/chemistry , Hemagglutinins, Viral/genetics , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Phylogeny , Public Health Surveillance , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Structure-Activity Relationship , Viral Fusion Proteins/chemistry , Viral Fusion Proteins/genetics
7.
Molecules ; 27(2)2022 Jan 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1628349

ABSTRACT

Hendra virus (HeV) belongs to the paramyxoviridae family of viruses which is associated with the respiratory distress, neurological illness, and potential fatality of the affected individuals. So far, no competitive approved therapeutic substance is available for HeV. For that reason, the current research work was conducted to propose some novel compounds, by adopting a Computer Aided Drug Discovery approach, which could be used to combat HeV. The G attachment Glycoprotein (Ggp) of HeV was selected to achieve the primary objective of this study, as this protein makes the entry of HeV possible in the host cells. Briefly, a library of 6000 antiviral compounds was screened for potential drug-like properties, followed by the molecular docking of short-listed compounds with the Protein Data Bank (PDB) structure of Ggp. Docked complexes of top two hits, having maximum binding affinities with the active sites of Ggp, were further considered for molecular dynamic simulations of 200 ns to elucidate the results of molecular docking analysis. MD simulations and Molecular Mechanics Energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area (MMGBSA) or Poisson-Boltzmann and Surface Area (MMPBSA) revealed that both docked complexes are stable in nature. Furthermore, the same methodology was used between lead compounds and HeV Ggp in complex with its functional receptor in human, Ephrin-B2. Surprisingly, no major differences were found in the results, which demonstrates that our identified compounds can also perform their action even when the Ggp is attached to the Ephrin-B2 ligand. Therefore, in light of all of these results, we strongly suggest that compounds (S)-5-(benzylcarbamoyl)-1-(2-(4-methyl-2-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl)-6-oxo-3,6-dihydropyridin-1-ium-3-ide and 5-(cyclohexylcarbamoyl)-1-(2-((2-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-methylpropyl)amino)-2-oxoethyl)-6-oxo-3,6-dihydropyridin-1-ium-3-ide could be considered as potential therapeutic agents against HeV; however, further in vitro and in vivo experiments are required to validate this study.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Computational Chemistry/methods , Viral Fusion Proteins/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Ephrin-B2/chemistry , Ephrin-B2/metabolism , Hendra Virus/drug effects , Humans , Hydrogen Bonding , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Small Molecule Libraries , Viral Fusion Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Water/chemistry
9.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260360, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546953

ABSTRACT

Recent emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and associated COVID-19 pandemic have posed a great challenge for the scientific community. In this study, we performed bioinformatic analyses on SARS-CoV-2 protein sequences, trying to unravel potential molecular similarities between this newly emerged pathogen with non-coronavirus ssRNA viruses. Comparing the proteins of SARS-CoV-2 with non-coronavirus positive and negative strand ssRNA viruses revealed multiple sequence similarities between SARS-CoV-2 and non-coronaviruses, including similarities between RNA-dependent RNA-polymerases and helicases (two highly-conserved proteins). We also observed similarities between SARS-CoV-2 surface (i.e. spike) protein with paramyxovirus fusion proteins. This similarity was restricted to a segment of spike protein S2 subunit which is involved in cell fusion. We next analyzed spike proteins from SARS-CoV-2 "variants of concern" (VOCs) and "variants of interests" (VOIs) and found that some of these variants show considerably higher spike-fusion similarity with paramyxoviruses. The 'spike-fusion' similarity was also observed for some pathogenic coronaviruses other than SARS-CoV-2. Epitope analysis using experimentally verified data deposited in Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) revealed that several B cell epitopes as well as T cell and MHC binding epitopes map within the spike-fusion similarity region. These data indicate that there might be a degree of convergent evolution between SARS-CoV-2 and paramyxovirus surface proteins which could be of pathogenic and immunological importance.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Fusion Proteins/genetics , Epitopes/genetics , Humans , Paramyxoviridae/genetics , Phylogeny , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry
10.
Cells ; 10(11)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526805

ABSTRACT

The advancement of precision medicine critically depends on the robustness and specificity of the carriers used for the targeted delivery of effector molecules in the human body. Numerous nanocarriers have been explored in vivo, to ensure the precise delivery of molecular cargos via tissue-specific targeting, including the endocrine part of the pancreas, thyroid, and adrenal glands. However, even after reaching the target organ, the cargo-carrying vehicle needs to enter the cell and then escape lysosomal destruction. Most artificial nanocarriers suffer from intrinsic limitations that prevent them from completing the specific delivery of the cargo. In this respect, extracellular vesicles (EVs) seem to be the natural tool for payload delivery due to their versatility and low toxicity. However, EV-mediated delivery is not selective and is usually short-ranged. By inserting the viral membrane fusion proteins into exosomes, it is possible to increase the efficiency of membrane recognition and also ease the process of membrane fusion. This review describes the molecular details of the viral-assisted interaction between the target cell and EVs. We also discuss the question of the usability of viral fusion proteins in developing extracellular vesicle-based nanocarriers with a higher efficacy of payload delivery. Finally, this review specifically highlights the role of Gag and RNA binding proteins in RNA sorting into EVs.


Subject(s)
Exosomes/metabolism , RNA Transport , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Membrane Fusion
11.
Expert Opin Ther Targets ; 25(10): 909, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1507098
12.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481007

ABSTRACT

Nipah virus (NiV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) possess two surface glycoproteins involved in cellular attachment and membrane fusion, both of which are potential targets for vaccines. The majority of vaccine development is focused on the attachment (G) protein of NiV, which is the immunodominant target. In contrast, the fusion (F) protein of RSV is the main target in vaccine development. Despite this, neutralising epitopes have been described in NiV F and RSV G, making them alternate targets for vaccine design. Through rational design, we have developed a vaccine strategy applicable to phylogenetically divergent NiV and RSV that comprises both the F and G proteins (FxG). In a mouse immunization model, we found that NiV FxG elicited an improved immune response capable of neutralising pseudotyped NiV and a NiV mutant that is able to escape neutralisation by two known F-specific antibodies. RSV FxG elicited an immune response against both F and G and was able to neutralise RSV; however, this was inferior to the immune response of F alone. Despite this, RSV FxG elicited a response against a known protective epitope within G that is conserved across RSV A and B subgroups, which may provide additional protection in vivo. We conclude that inclusion of F and G antigens within a single design provides a streamlined subunit vaccine strategy against both emerging and established pathogens, with the potential for broader protection against NiV.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Henipavirus Infections/prevention & control , Nipah Virus/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Female , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Subunit/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology , Viral Envelope Proteins/administration & dosage , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Fusion Proteins/immunology
13.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470996

ABSTRACT

Infections with viral pathogens are widespread and can cause a variety of different diseases. In-depth knowledge about viral triggers initiating an immune response is necessary to decipher viral pathogenesis. Inflammasomes, as part of the innate immune system, can be activated by viral pathogens. However, viral structural components responsible for inflammasome activation remain largely unknown. Here we analyzed glycoproteins derived from SARS-CoV-1/2, HCMV and HCV, required for viral entry and fusion, as potential triggers of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and pyroptosis in THP-1 macrophages. All tested glycoproteins were able to potently induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation, indicated by ASC-SPECK formation and secretion of cleaved IL-1ß. Lytic cell death via gasdermin D (GSDMD), pore formation, and pyroptosis are required for IL-1ß release. As a hallmark of pyroptosis, we were able to detect cleavage of GSDMD and, correspondingly, cell death in THP-1 macrophages. CRISPR-Cas9 knockout of NLRP3 and GSDMD in THP-1 macrophages confirmed and strongly support the evidence that viral glycoproteins can act as innate immunity triggers. With our study, we decipher key mechanisms of viral pathogenesis by showing that viral glycoproteins potently induce innate immune responses. These insights could be beneficial in vaccine development and provide new impulses for the investigation of vaccine-induced innate immunity.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Innate/immunology , Inflammasomes/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/immunology , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology , Viral Fusion Proteins/immunology , Cell Line, Tumor , Cytomegalovirus/immunology , Hepacivirus/immunology , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/biosynthesis , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Pyroptosis/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , THP-1 Cells
14.
Adv Virus Res ; 111: 1-29, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370123

ABSTRACT

Parainfluenza viruses, members of the enveloped, negative-sense, single stranded RNA Paramyxoviridae family, impact global child health as the cause of significant lower respiratory tract infections. Parainfluenza viruses enter cells by fusing directly at the cell surface membrane. How this fusion occurs via the coordinated efforts of the two molecules that comprise the viral surface fusion complex, and how these efforts may be blocked, are the subjects of this chapter. The receptor binding protein of parainfluenza forms a complex with the fusion protein of the virus, remaining stably associated until a receptor is reached. At that point, the receptor binding protein actively triggers the fusion protein to undergo a series of transitions that ultimately lead to membrane fusion and viral entry. In recent years it has become possible to examine this remarkable process on the surface of viral particles and to begin to understand the steps in the transition of this molecular machine, using a structural biology approach. Understanding the steps in entry leads to several possible strategies to prevent fusion and inhibit infection.


Subject(s)
Paramyxoviridae Infections , Virus Internalization , Humans , Membrane Fusion , Parainfluenza Virus 3, Human , Viral Fusion Proteins/genetics
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(24)2020 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383876

ABSTRACT

Cell-cell fusion between eukaryotic cells is a general process involved in many physiological and pathological conditions, including infections by bacteria, parasites, and viruses. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses use intracellular machineries and pathways for efficient replication in their host target cells. Interestingly, certain viruses, and, more especially, enveloped viruses belonging to different viral families and including human pathogens, can mediate cell-cell fusion between infected cells and neighboring non-infected cells. Depending of the cellular environment and tissue organization, this virus-mediated cell-cell fusion leads to the merge of membrane and cytoplasm contents and formation of multinucleated cells, also called syncytia, that can express high amount of viral antigens in tissues and organs of infected hosts. This ability of some viruses to trigger cell-cell fusion between infected cells as virus-donor cells and surrounding non-infected target cells is mainly related to virus-encoded fusion proteins, known as viral fusogens displaying high fusogenic properties, and expressed at the cell surface of the virus-donor cells. Virus-induced cell-cell fusion is then mediated by interactions of these viral fusion proteins with surface molecules or receptors involved in virus entry and expressed on neighboring non-infected cells. Thus, the goal of this review is to give an overview of the different animal virus families, with a more special focus on human pathogens, that can trigger cell-cell fusion.


Subject(s)
Cell Fusion , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Membrane Fusion , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Viruses/metabolism , Animals , Humans , Viruses/isolation & purification
17.
J Mol Biol ; 433(10): 166946, 2021 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386061

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses are a major infectious disease threat, and include the zoonotic-origin human pathogens SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV (SARS-2, SARS-1, and MERS). Entry of coronaviruses into host cells is mediated by the spike (S) protein. In our previous ESR studies, the local membrane ordering effect of the fusion peptide (FP) of various viral glycoproteins including the S of SARS-1 and MERS has been consistently observed. We previously determined that the sequence immediately downstream from the S2' cleavage site is the bona fide SARS-1 FP. In this study, we used sequence alignment to identify the SARS-2 FP, and studied its membrane ordering effect. Although there are only three residue differences, SARS-2 FP induces even greater membrane ordering than SARS-1 FP, possibly due to its greater hydrophobicity. This may be a reason that SARS-2 is better able to infect host cells. In addition, the membrane binding enthalpy for SARS-2 is greater. Both the membrane ordering of SARS-2 and SARS-1 FPs are dependent on Ca2+, but that of SARS-2 shows a greater response to the presence of Ca2+. Both FPs bind two Ca2+ ions as does SARS-1 FP, but the two Ca2+ binding sites of SARS-2 exhibit greater cooperativity. This Ca2+ dependence by the SARS-2 FP is very ion-specific. These results show that Ca2+ is an important regulator that interacts with the SARS-2 FP and thus plays a significant role in SARS-2 viral entry. This could lead to therapeutic solutions that either target the FP-calcium interaction or block the Ca2+ channel.


Subject(s)
Calcium/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , Calcium/pharmacology , Calorimetry , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/virology , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Thermodynamics , Viral Fusion Proteins/chemistry , Viral Fusion Proteins/genetics , Virus Internalization/drug effects
18.
Molecules ; 26(16)2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362397

ABSTRACT

Protein glycosylation that mediates interactions among viral proteins, host receptors, and immune molecules is an important consideration for predicting viral antigenicity. Viral spike proteins, the proteins responsible for host cell invasion, are especially important to be examined. However, there is a lack of consensus within the field of glycoproteomics regarding identification strategy and false discovery rate (FDR) calculation that impedes our examinations. As a case study in the overlap between software, here as a case study, we examine recently published SARS-CoV-2 glycoprotein datasets with four glycoproteomics identification software with their recommended protocols: GlycReSoft, Byonic, pGlyco2, and MSFragger-Glyco. These software use different Target-Decoy Analysis (TDA) forms to estimate FDR and have different database-oriented search methods with varying degrees of quantification capabilities. Instead of an ideal overlap between software, we observed different sets of identifications with the intersection. When clustering by glycopeptide identifications, we see higher degrees of relatedness within software than within glycosites. Taking the consensus between results yields a conservative and non-informative conclusion as we lose identifications in the desire for caution; these non-consensus identifications are often lower abundance and, therefore, more susceptible to nuanced changes. We conclude that present glycoproteomics softwares are not directly comparable, and that methods are needed to assess their overall results and FDR estimation performance. Once such tools are developed, it will be possible to improve FDR methods and quantify complex glycoproteomes with acceptable confidence, rather than potentially misleading broad strokes.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Glycopeptides/analysis , Glycoproteins/analysis , COVID-19/metabolism , Databases, Protein , Glycopeptides/chemistry , Glycoproteins/chemistry , Glycosylation , Humans , Proteomics/methods , Proteomics/standards , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Software , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/analysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Tandem Mass Spectrometry/methods , Viral Fusion Proteins/analysis , Viral Fusion Proteins/chemistry
19.
Fluids Barriers CNS ; 18(1): 39, 2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357035
20.
Mol Divers ; 25(3): 1999-2000, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303350

ABSTRACT

We read with interest the article by Patel et al. on the identification of potential inhibitors of coronavirus hemagglutinin-esterase. The authors considered hemagglutinin-esterase as a glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 and selected hemagglutinin-esterase as a target to identify potential inhibitors using a combination of various computational approaches, and however, SARS-CoV-2 genome lacks hemagglutinin-esterase gene; thus, hemagglutinin-esterase does not exist in SARS-CoV-2 particle.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Design , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Genome, Viral/genetics , Hemagglutinins, Viral/genetics , Hemagglutinins, Viral/metabolism , Viral Fusion Proteins/genetics , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism
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