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1.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(1): 18-26, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100783

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic mental illness are frequently hospitalized and discharged from psychiatry wards. This situation is referred to as the "revolving door phenomenon" (RDP). In addition to factors related to the patient and the disease, limited number of beds leading to shortened hospital stay are among the reasons associated with frequent hospitalization. This study aims to compare patients with RDP and patients with single hospitalization in terms of clinical, sociodemographic, and treatment-oriented characteristics in order to evaluate the risk factors causing frequent hospitalization. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In this study, patients who were admitted and hospitalized between May 1, 2011 - May 1, 2016 were retrospectively evaluated from patient records. The RDP group consisted of 74 patients and the single-hospitalization group consisted of 59 patients who met inclusion criteria. RESULTS: The RDP group had significantly higher rates of male gender, ECT history, past suicide attempts, multiple drug treatment, clozapine use, legal incidents, and noncompliance to follow up following discharge compared to the single-hospitalization group (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that Turkey also has RDP patients with characteristics and hospitalization patterns similar to patients in countries with different cultural, social, and economic conditions. It is important to identify and correct factors that cause frequent hospitalization as it will reduce the burden of the health system as well as provide benefit to the patient.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder , Psychotic Disorders , Schizophrenia , Bipolar Disorder/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Mood Disorders , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Schizophrenia/epidemiology , Turkey/epidemiology
2.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39 Suppl 129(2): 149-154, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091801

ABSTRACT

People with cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis (CV) have an increased risk of infections, attributed to different causes: impairment of the immune system due to the disease itself, comorbidities, and immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, these patients may be at high risk for a more severe course of COVID-19, including hospitalisation and death. Concerns about efficacy, immunogenicity and safety of vaccines, as well as doubts, not yet fully clarified in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, represent other important factors for a low vaccination rate in people with (CV). Indeed, providing an expert position on the issues related to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in patients suffering from CV is of critical relevance in order to help both patients and clinicians who are treating them in making the best choice in each case. A multidisciplinary task force of the Italian Group for the Study of Cryoglobulinaemia (GISC) was convened, and through a Delphi technique produced provisional recommendations regarding SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in cryoglobulinaemic patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cryoglobulinemia , Vasculitis , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Italy , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
3.
Hepatol Commun ; 4(9): 1242-1256, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1898760

ABSTRACT

The recent outbreak of the novel virus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes the corona virus disease of 2019 (COVID19), has spread globally and affects millions of people. This pandemic has taxed our health care system and disrupted normal operations, even life-saving procedures, such as liver transplants. During these unprecedented times, providers and patients are imperiled and resources for diagnosis and care may be limited. Continuing to perform resource-intense advanced procedures is challenging, as is caring for patients with end-stage liver disease or patients with urgent needs for liver tumor control. Liver transplantation, in particular, requires critical resources, like blood products and critical care beds, which are fairly limited in the COVID19 pandemic. The potential of COVID19 infections in posttransplant recipients on immunosuppression and staff contacts further adds to the complexity. Therefore, transplant programs must reevaluate the ethicality, feasibility, and safety of performing liver transplants during this pandemic. Herein, we discuss the clinical and ethical challenges posed by performing liver transplants and offer guidance for managing patients with end-stage liver disease during the COVID19 pandemic.

4.
J Ayurveda Integr Med ; 13(1): 100424, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1838955

ABSTRACT

For centuries, traditional medicines of Ayurveda have been in use to manage infectious and non-infectious diseases. The key embodiment of traditional medicines is the holistic system of approach in the management of human diseases. SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection is an ongoing pandemic, which has emerged as the major health threat worldwide and is causing significant stress, morbidity and mortality. Studies from the individuals with SARS-CoV-2 infection have shown significant immune dysregulation and cytokine overproduction. Neutrophilia and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio has been correlated to poor outcome due to the disease. Neutrophils, component of innate immune system, upon stimulation expel DNA along with histones and granular proteins to form extracellular traps (NETs). Although, these DNA lattices possess beneficial activity in trapping and eliminating pathogens, NETs may also cause adverse effects by inducing immunothrombosis and tissue damage in diseases including Type 2 Diabetes and atherosclerosis. Tissues of SARS-CoV-2 infected subjects showed microthrombi with neutrophil-platelet infiltration and serum showed elevated NETs components, suggesting large involvement and uncontrolled activation of neutrophils leading to pathogenesis and associated organ damage. Hence, traditional Ayurvedic herbs exhibiting anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties may act in a manner that might prove beneficial in targeting over-functioning of neutrophils and there by promoting normal immune homeostasis. In the present manuscript, we have reviewed and discussed pathological importance of NETs formation in SARS-CoV-2 infections and discuss how various Ayurvedic herbs can be explored to modulate neutrophil function and inhibit NETs formation in the context of a) anti-microbial activity to enhance neutrophil function, b) immunomodulatory effects to maintain neutrophil mediated immune homeostasis and c) to inhibit NETs mediated thrombosis.

5.
J Xenobiot ; 11(2): 77-93, 2021 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834825

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, occurring due to SARS-COV-2 infection, is the most recent pandemic disease that has led to three million deaths at the time of writing. A great deal of effort has been directed towards altering the virus trajectory and/or managing the interactions of the virus with its subsequent targets in the human body; these interactions can lead to a chain reaction-like state manifested by a cytokine storm and progress to multiple organ failure. During cytokine storms the ratio of pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory mediators is generally increased, which contributes to the instigation of hyper-inflammation and confers advantages to the virus. Because cytokine expression patterns fluctuate from one person to another and even within the same person from one time to another, we suggest a road map of COVID-19 management using an individual approach instead of focusing on the blockbuster process (one treatment for most people, if not all). Here, we highlight the biology of the virus, study the interaction between the virus and humans, and present potential pharmacological and non-pharmacological modulators that might contribute to the global war against SARS-COV-2. We suggest an algorithmic roadmap to manage COVID-19.

6.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0250815, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833533

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a respiratory infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, and cardiovascular damage is commonly observed in affected patients. We sought to investigate the effect of SARS-CoV-2 infection on cardiac injury and hypertension during the current coronavirus pandemic. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The clinical data of 366 hospitalized COVID-19-confirmed patients were analyzed. The clinical signs and laboratory findings were extracted from electronic medical records. Two independent, experienced clinicians reviewed and analyzed the data. RESULTS: Cardiac injury was found in 11.19% (30/268) of enrolled patients. 93.33% (28/30) of cardiac injury cases were in the severe group. The laboratory findings indicated that white blood cells, neutrophils, procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, lactate, and lactic dehydrogenase were positively associated with cardiac injury marker. Compared with healthy controls, the 190 patients without prior hypertension have higher AngⅡ level, of which 16 (8.42%) patients had a rise in blood pressure to the diagnostic criteria of hypertension during hospitalization, with a significantly increased level of the cTnI, procalcitonin, angiotensin-II (AngⅡ) than those normal blood pressure ones. Multivariate analysis indicated that elevated age, cTnI, the history of hypertension, and diabetes were independent predictors for illness severity. The predictive model, based on the four parameters and gender, has a good ability to identify the clinical severity of COVID-19 in hospitalized patients (area under the curve: 0.932, sensitivity: 98.67%, specificity: 75.68%). CONCLUSION: Hypertension, sometimes accompanied by elevated cTnI, may occur in COVID-19 patients and become a sequela. Enhancing Ang II signaling, driven by SARS-CoV-2 infection, might play an important role in the renin-angiotensin system, and consequently lead to the development of hypertension in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Heart Injuries/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Disease Progression , Female , Heart Injuries/virology , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypertension/physiopathology , Hypertension/virology , Male , Medical Records , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
7.
Arch Acad Emerg Med ; 8(1): e34, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787362

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The outbreak of the new Coronavirus in China in December 2019 and subsequently in various countries around the world has raised concerns about the possibility of vertical transmission of the virus from mother to fetus. The present study aimed to review published literature in this regard. METHODS: In this narrative review, were searched for all articles published in various databases including PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Science Direct, and Web of Science using MeSH-compliant keywords including COVID-19, Pregnancy, Vertical transmission, Coronavirus 2019, SARS-CoV-2 and 2019-nCoV from December 2019 to March 18, 2020 and reviewed them. All type of articles published about COVID-19 and vertical transmission in pregnancy were included. RESULTS: A review of 13 final articles published in this area revealed that COVID-19 can cause fetal distress, miscarriage, respiratory distress and preterm delivery in pregnant women but does not infect newborns. There has been no report of vertical transmission in pregnancy, and it has been found that clinical symptoms of COVID-19 in pregnant women are not different from those of non-pregnant women. CONCLUSION: Overall, due to lack of appropriate data about the effect of COVID-19 on pregnancy, it is necessary to monitor suspected pregnant women before and after delivery. For confirmed cases both the mother and the newborn child should be followed up comprehensively.

8.
Pediatr Emerg Care ; 38(1): e398-e403, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767003

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in pediatric patients has been associated with low risk of concomitant bacterial infection. However, in children with severe disease, it occurs in 22% to 50% of patients. As viral testing becomes routine, bacterial codetections are increasingly identified in patients with non-RSV viruses. We hypothesized, among patients intubated for respiratory failure secondary to suspected infection, there are similar rates of codetection between RSV and non-RSV viral detections. METHODS: This retrospective chart review, conducted over a 5-year period, included all patients younger than 2 years who required intubation secondary to respiratory failure from an infectious etiology in a single pediatric emergency department. Patients intubated for noninfectious causes were excluded. RESULTS: We reviewed 274 patients, of which 181 had positive viral testing. Of these, 48% were RSV-positive and 52% were positive for viruses other than RSV. Codetection of bacteria was found in 76% (n = 65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 66%, 84%) of RSV-positive patients and 66% (n = 63, 95% CI: 57%, 76%) of patients positive with non-RSV viruses. Among patients with negative viral testing, 33% had bacterial growth on lower respiratory culture. Male sex was the only patient-related factor associated with increased odds of codetection (odds ratio [OR], 2.2; 95% CI, 1.08-4.38). The odds of codetection between RSV-positive patients and non-RSV viruses were not significantly different (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.62-2.71). CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial codetection is common and not associated with anticipated patient-related factors or with a specific virus. These results suggest consideration of empiric antibiotics in infants with respiratory illness requiring intubation.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human , Respiratory Tract Infections , Bacteria , Child , Humans , Infant , Male , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/complications , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
9.
J Clin Med ; 10(4)2021 Feb 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753585

ABSTRACT

Hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) is a rare hyperinflammatory condition which may be primary or secondary to many diseases, including hematologic malignancies. Due to its life-threatening evolution, a timely diagnosis is paramount but challenging, since it relies on non-specific clinical and laboratory criteria. The latter are often altered in other diseases, including autoimmune cytopenias (AIC), which in turn can be secondary to infections, systemic autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present article, we describe two patients presenting at the emergency department with acute AICs subsequently diagnosed as HLH with underlying diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We discuss the diagnostic challenges in the differential diagnosis of acute cytopenias in the internal medicine setting, providing a literature review of secondary HLH and AIC.

10.
Viruses ; 12(5)2020 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726007

ABSTRACT

In January 2020, Chinese health agencies reported an outbreak of a novel coronavirus-2 (CoV-2) which can lead to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The virus, which belongs to the coronavirus family (SARS-CoV-2), was named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO). Full-length genome sequences of SARS-CoV-2 showed 79.6% sequence identity to SARS-CoV, with 96% identity to a bat coronavirus at the whole-genome level. COVID-19 has caused over 133,000 deaths and there are over 2 million total confirmed cases as of April 15th, 2020. Current treatment plans are still under investigation due to a lack of understanding of COVID-19. One potential mechanism to slow disease progression is the use of antiviral drugs to either block the entry of the virus or interfere with viral replication and maturation. Currently, antiviral drugs, including chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine, remdesivir, and lopinavir/ritonavir, have shown effective inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. Due to the high dose needed and narrow therapeutic window, many patients are experiencing severe side effects with the above drugs. Hence, repurposing these drugs with a proper formulation is needed to improve the safety and efficacy for COVID-19 treatment. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a family of natural carriers in the human body. They play a critical role in cell-to-cell communications. EVs can be used as unique drug carriers to deliver protease inhibitors to treat COVID-19. EVs may provide targeted delivery of protease inhibitors, with fewer systemic side effects. More importantly, EVs are eligible for major aseptic processing and can be upscaled for mass production. Currently, the FDA is facilitating applications to treat COVID-19, which provides a very good chance to use EVs to contribute in this combat.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Extracellular Vesicles/chemistry , HIV Protease Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Approval , Drug Delivery Systems , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Int J Vitam Nutr Res ; 92(1): 35-48, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1721399

ABSTRACT

Recently, the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome cornoavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has become a great perturbation all around the globe and has many devastating effects on every aspect of life. Apart from the oxygen therapy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, Remdesivir and Dexamethasone have been proven to be efficacious against COVID-19, along with various vaccine candidates and monoclonal antibody cocktail therapy for Regeneron. All of these are currently at different stages of clinical trials. People with weak immunity are more prone to a severe infection of SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, early and judicious nutritional supplementation along with pharmacological treatment and clinician collaborations are critical in restituting the current situation. Nutritional supplements help in acquiring strong immunity to prevent the progression of disease any further. Vitamin C, vitamin D, selenium, zinc and many other nutritional and dietary supplements inhibit the production of inflammatory cytokines during a viral infection and prevents several unwanted symptoms of infection. Many dietary components like citrus fruits, black elderberry, ginger, and probiotics have the ability to attack viral replication. These supplements can also tame the overriding immune system during coronavirus infection. Keeping in view these facts, nutritional and dietary supplements can be used along with other management modalities. These nutritional and dietary supplements are potential candidates to curb the convulsive unfolding of novel COVID-19, in combination with other standard treatment protocols. In this review, various search engines were used to exploit available literature in order to provide a comprehensive review on nutritional and dietary supplements with respect to the viral infections. It will also provide a brief overview on some of the clinical trials that are in progress to assess the role of nutritional supplements, either alone or in combination with other pharmacological drugs, in fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Dietary Supplements , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamins
12.
Transplantation ; 106(3): 641-647, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703842

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Heart transplant (HT) recipients may be at higher risk of acquiring SARS-CoV-2 infection and developing critical illness. The aim of this study is to describe characteristics and outcomes of HT recipients infected by SARS-COV-2, from a high-volume transplant center. METHODS: We have described data of all adult HT recipients with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 by RT-PCR in nasopharyngeal samples from April 5, 2020, to January 5, 2021. Outcomes and follow-up were recorded until February 5, 2021. RESULTS: Forty patients were included. Twenty-four patients (60%) were men; the median age was 53 (40-60) y old; median HT time was 34 mo; and median follow-up time 162 d. The majority needed hospitalization (83%). Immunosuppressive therapy was reduced/withdrawn in the majority of patients, except from steroids, which were maintained. Seventeen patients (42.5%) were classified as having severe disease according to the ordinal scale developed by the World Health Organization Committee. They tended to have lower absolute lymphocyte count (P < 0.001) during follow-up when compared with patients with mild disease. Thirty-day mortality was 12.5%. However, a longer follow-up revealed increased later mortality (27.5%), with median time to death around 35 d. Bacterial nosocomial infections were a leading cause of death. Cardiac allograft rejection (10%) and ventricular dysfunction (12.5%) were also not negligible. CONCLUSIONS: Major findings of this study corroborate other cohorts' results, but it also reports significant rate of later events, suggesting that a strict midterm surveillance is advisable to HT recipients with coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Transplantation , Adult , Heart Transplantation/adverse effects , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients
13.
Eur J Public Health ; 31(3): 630-634, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665968

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People from South Asian and black minority ethnic groups are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is unknown whether deprivation mediates this excess ethnic risk. METHODS: We used UK Biobank with linked COVID-19 outcomes occurring between 16th March 2020 and 24th August 2020. A four-way decomposition mediation analysis was used to model the extent to which the excess risk of testing positive, severe disease and mortality for COVID-19 in South Asian and black individuals, relative to white individuals, would be eliminated if levels of high material deprivation were reduced within the population. RESULTS: We included 15 044 (53.0% women) South Asian and black and 392 786 (55.2% women) white individuals. There were 151 (1.0%) positive tests, 91 (0.6%) severe cases and 31 (0.2%) deaths due to COVID-19 in South Asian and black individuals compared with 1471 (0.4%), 895 (0.2%) and 313 (0.1%), respectively, in white individuals. Compared with white individuals, the relative risk of testing positive for COVID-19, developing severe disease and COVID-19 mortality in South Asian and black individuals were 2.73 (95% CI: 2.26, 3.19), 2.96 (2.31, 3.61) and 4.04 (2.54, 5.55), respectively. A hypothetical intervention moving the 25% most deprived in the population out of deprivation was modelled to eliminate between 40 and 50% of the excess risk of all COVID-19 outcomes in South Asian and black populations, whereas moving the 50% most deprived out of deprivation would eliminate over 80% of the excess risk of COVID-19 outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The excess risk of COVID-19 outcomes in South Asian and black communities could be substantially reduced with population level policies targeting material deprivation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Eur J Ophthalmol ; 32(1): NP168-NP172, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633471

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Papillophlebitis is a rare condition characterized by venous congestion and optic disc edema, which has been suggested to occur as a consequence of inflammation of the retinal veins or, possibly, the capillaries of the optic disc, leading to venous insufficiency and compression of the central retina vein. The disease affects healthy young adults and commonly has a benign course, however, if complications such as macular edema or ischemia appears, treatment should be instituted immediately to avoid poor prognosis. CASE REPORT: A 40-year old white male patient consulted for a slight decrease in the sensitivity of the visual field in his left eye (OS). Visual acuities (VA) were 20/20 in both eyes. OS fundus examination showed dilated and tortuous retinal vessels, disc edema, and retinal hemorrhages. The patient was diagnosed with papillophlebitis. OS VA decreased to 20/200 due to macular edema, and he was treated with a intravitreal dexamethasone implant. An exhaustive and interdisciplinary exploration process was performed, identifying a recent disease and recovery of Covid-19 as the only factor of inflammation and coagulation alteration. Other systemic diseases were excluded. We also describe a rapid decrease in disc and macular edema after intravitreal dexametasone injection, which could support the inflammatory hypothesis. CONCLUSION: The importance of this case lies in the possible association of papillophlebitis with the new Covid-19 disease. We believe that the inflammatory reaction and the coagulation alteration present in our patient due to Sars-Cov2 coronavirus may have acted as risk factors for the development of papillophlebitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Macular Edema , Retinal Vein Occlusion , Adult , Humans , Inflammation , Male , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 15(5): e33-e42, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632365

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: An unprecedented wave of patients with acute respiratory failure due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) disease 2019 (COVID-19) hit emergency departments (EDs) in Lombardy, starting in the second half of February 2020. This study describes the direct and indirect impacts of the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak on an urban major-hospital ED. METHODS: Data regarding all patients diagnosed with COVID-19 presenting from February 1 to March 31, 2020, were prospectively collected, while data regarding non-COVID patients presenting within the same period in 2019 were retrospectively retrieved. RESULTS: ED attendance dropped by 37% in 2020. Two-thirds of this reduction occurred early after the identification of the first autochthonous COVID-19 case in Lombardy, before lockdown measures were enforced. Hospital admissions of non-COVID patients fell by 26%. During the peak of COVID-19 attendance, the ED faced an extraordinary increase in: patients needing oxygen (+239%) or noninvasive ventilation (+725%), transfers to the intensive care unit (+57%), and in-hospital mortality (+309%), compared with the same period in 2019. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 outbreak determined an unprecedented upsurge in respiratory failure cases and mortality. Fear of contagion triggered a spontaneous, marked reduction of ED attendance, and, presumably, some as yet unknown quantity of missed or delayed diagnoses for conditions other than COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Communicable Disease Control , Emergency Service, Hospital , Fear , Humans , Retrospective Studies
16.
Int J Gen Med ; 14: 2407-2412, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581589

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The management of COVID-19 patients requires efficiency and accuracy in methods of detection, identification, monitoring, and treatment feasible in every hospital. Aside from clinical presentations and laboratory markers, chest x-ray imaging could also detect pneumonia caused by COVID-19. It is also a fast, simple, cheap, and safe modality used for the management of COVID-19 patients. Established scoring systems of COVID-19 chest x-ray imaging include Radiographic Assessment of Lung Edema (RALE) and Brixia classification. A modified scoring system has been adopted from BRIXIA and RALE scoring systems and has been made to adjust the scoring system needs at Dr. Soetomo General Hospital, Indonesia. This study aims to determine the value of scoring systems through chest x-ray imaging in evaluating the severity of COVID-19. METHODS: Data were collected from May to June of 2020 who underwent chest x-ray evaluation. Each image is then scored using three types of classifications: modified score, RALE score, and Brixia score. The scores are then analyzed and compared with the clinical conditions and laboratory markers to determine their value in evaluating the severity of COVID-19 infection in patients. RESULTS: A total of 115 patients were males (51.1%) and 110 were females (48.9%). All three scoring systems are significantly correlated with the clinical severity of the disease, with the strengths of correlation in order from the strongest to weakest as Brixia score (p<0.01, correlation coefficient 0.232), RALE score (p<0.01, correlation coefficient 0.209), and Dr. Soetomo General Hospital score (p<0.01, correlation coefficient 0.194). All three scoring systems correlate significantly with each other. Dr. Soetomo General Hospital score correlates more towards Brixia score (p<0.01, correlation coefficient 0.865) than RALE score (p<0.01, correlation coefficient 0.855). Brixia to RALE score correlates with a coefficient of 0.857 (p<0.01). CONCLUSION: The modified scoring system can help determine the severity of the disease progression in COVID-19 patients especially in areas with shortages of facilities and specialists.

17.
Infect Dis Now ; 51(5): 435-439, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574384

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the world. Given the sharply increased infection rate, the number of pregnant women and children with COVID-19 is correspondingly on the rise. SARS-CoV-2 infection is transmitted through droplets; though hypothesized, other transmission routes have not been confirmed. As of now, it remains unclear whether and how SARS-CoV-2 can possibly be transmitted from the mother to the fetus. METHOD: This study examines the medical records of 30 neonates born to women with COVID-19, the objective being to provide documented information on maternal-child transmission and infant outcomes. RESULTS: Out of the 30 newborns, 28 had negative PCR test results for SARS-CoV-2; among their mothers, fifteen had fever, nine had cough and twenty had delivered by cesarean section. The median birth term was 37wk2dy, and twenty of the neonates were male. Most of them were asymptomatic, except for the three who presented with shortness of breath. Two of them were intubated and both died, the first because of severe sepsis and the second due to severe hyaline membrane disease. As regards the two infected neonates, the first represents a probable case of congenital SARS-CoV-2 infection, which appears unlikely in the second case. The outcome for both of them was good, without any complications. CONCLUSION: Maternal-fetal transmission of the SARS- CoV-2 virus was not detected in the majority of the reported cases, although two of 30 neonates had positive qRT-PCR test results. Our study supports the hypothesis that though it seldom actually occurs, in utero SARS-CoV-2 vertical transmission is possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mothers , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 587146, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574304

ABSTRACT

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a fast spreading virus leading to the development of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19). Severe and critical cases are characterized by damage to the respiratory system, endothelial inflammation, and multiple organ failure triggered by an excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines, culminating in the high number of deaths all over the world. Sedentarism induces worse, continuous, and progressive consequences to health. On the other hand, physical activity provides benefits to health and improves low-grade systemic inflammation. The aim of this review is to elucidate the effects of physical activity in physical fitness, immune defense, and its contribution to mitigate the severe inflammatory response mediated by SARS-CoV-2. Physical exercise is an effective therapeutic strategy to mitigate the consequences of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this sense, studies have shown that acute physical exercise induces the production of myokines that are secreted in tissues and into the bloodstream, supporting its systemic modulatory effect. Therefore, maintaining physical activity influence balance the immune system and increases immune vigilance, and also might promote potent effects against the consequences of infectious diseases and chronic diseases associated with the development of severe forms of COVID-19. Protocols to maintain exercise practice are suggested and have been strongly established, such as home-based exercise (HBE) and outdoor-based exercise (OBE). In this regard, HBE might help to reduce levels of physical inactivity, bed rest, and sitting time, impacting on adherence to physical activity, promoting all the benefits related to exercise, and attracting patients in different stages of treatment for COVID-19. In parallel, OBE must improve health, but also prevent and mitigate COVID-19 severe outcomes in all populations. In conclusion, HBE or OBE models can be a potent strategy to mitigate the progress of infection, and a coadjutant therapy for COVID-19 at all ages and different chronic conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Exercise , Healthy Lifestyle , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sedentary Behavior , Animals , Home Care Services , Humans , Physical Fitness , Social Isolation
19.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 22, 2021 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557646

ABSTRACT

Background: The emergence of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has presented an unprecedented global challenge for the healthcare community. The ability of SARS-CoV-2 to get transmitted during the asymptomatic phase, and its high infectivity have led to the rapid transmission of COVID-19 beyond geographic regions facilitated by international travel, leading to a pandemic. To guide effective control and interventions, primary data is required urgently, globally, including from low- and middle-income countries where documentation of cardiovascular manifestations and risk factors in people hospitalized with COVID-19 is limited. Objectives: This study aims to describe the cardiovascular manifestations and cardiovascular risk factors in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Methods: We propose to conduct an observational cohort study involving 5000 patients recruited from hospitals in low-, middle- and high-income countries. Eligible adult COVID-19 patients will be recruited from the participating hospitals and followed-up until 30 days post admission. The outcomes will be reported at discharge and includes the need of ICU admission, need of ventilator, death (with cause), major adverse cardiovascular events, neurological outcomes, acute renal failure, and pulmonary outcomes. Conclusion: Given the enormous burden posed by COVID-19 and the associated severe prognostic implication of CVD involvement, this study will provide useful insights on the risk factors for severe disease, clinical presentation, and outcomes of various cardiovascular manifestations in COVID-19 patients particularly from low and middle income countries from where the data remain scant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Global Health , Observational Studies as Topic/methods , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Prognosis , Risk Factors
20.
Urban For Urban Green ; 62: 127136, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531860

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and related social distancing measures have altered the daily lifestyles of people worldwide. Although studies on this disease are emerging rapidly, less is known about the impacts of COVID-19 and urban greenery on leisure-time physical activity, which is critical to maintain health for urban residents during the pandemic. In this study, we used a natural experimental research design to identify whether urban greenery cushions the decrease in leisure-time physical activity caused by the pandemic and related social distancing measures in a high-density city. The two-wave physical activity data (before and during the pandemic) were collected for urban residents in neighborhoods with high or low levels of greenery. The results of difference-in-differences model suggest that urban greenery mitigated the decrease in physical activity during the pandemic. People who lived in greener neighborhoods experienced a lesser decrease in the leisure-time physical activity level than those who lived in less green neighborhoods. Additionally, people who lived in greener neighborhoods experienced increased levels of physical activity related to visits to country parks during the pandemic. These findings suggest that urban green spaces play a significant role in shaping physical activity and providing a refuge for the public during crises. Our study is among the first to investigate the impact of urban greenery on pandemic-induced changes in leisure-time physical activity in densely populated Asian cities, and our findings shed light on the potential protective role of urban greenery on public health during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

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