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1.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 31(6): 883-887, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189901

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions on patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) for ovarian cancer. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated ovarian cancer patients who underwent HIPEC following complete cytoreductive surgery performed during the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in three different centers specializing in gynecological oncology. All patients who underwent cytoreduction plus HIPEC for a primary, interval, and recurrent surgery were evaluated. Primary outcomes was postoperative 30-day morbidity and mortality. The secondary outcome was infection of patient and/or related staff with COVID-19 during the perioperative or early postoperative period. RESULTS: We performed a total of 35 HIPEC procedures during the pandemic: 15 (42.9%) patients underwent primary/interval surgery, while 20 (57.1%) patients had recurrent disease. Grade 3-4 complications occurred in one patient (2.9%) (chronic renal failure), while mortality did not occur in any patient. Neither the patients nor related staff were infected with the coronavirus during the perioperative or early postoperative period. One patient, who was diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia on postoperative day 80 died from the infection. Another patient died on postoperative day 85 due to progressive ovarian cancer, a disorder in vital functions, and organ failure. CONCLUSION: HIPEC during the COVID-19 pandemic seems a safe and feasible procedure, with acceptable morbidity and mortality rates. Careful selection of patients is important and precautions should be taken before the procedure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy/methods , Ovarian Neoplasms/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
2.
J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod ; 50(8): 102133, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157518

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has put tremendous pressure on the French healthcare system. Almost all hospital departments have had to profoundly modify their activity to cope with the crisis. In this context, the surgical management of cancers has been a topic of debate as care strategies were tailored to avoid any delay in treatment that could be detrimental to patient wellbeing while being careful not to overload intensive care units. The primary objective of this study was to observe changes in the surgical management of pelvic cancers during the COVID-19 pandemic in France. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study analyzed data from the prospective multi-center cohort study conducted by the French Society for Pelvic and Gynecological Surgery (SCGP) with methodological support from the French (FRANCOGYN) Group. All members of the SCGP received by e-mail a link allowing them to include patients who were scheduled to undergo gynecological carcinologic surgery between March 16th 2020 and May 11th 2020. Demographic data, the characteristics of cancers and the impact of the crisis in terms of changes to the usual recommended coarse of care were collected. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients with a median age 63 years were included in the cohort. In total, 31 patients had cervical cancer, 76 patients had endometrial cancer, 52 patients had ovarian or tubal cancer, 5 patients had a borderline tumor of the ovary, and 17 patients had vulvar cancer. During the study period, the care strategy was changed for 49 (27%) patients with postponed for 35 (19.3%) patients, and canceled for 7 (3.9%) patients. Surgical treatment was maintained for 139 (76.8%) patients. Management with neoadjuvant chemotherapy was offered to 19 (10,5%) patients and a change in surgical choice was made for 5 (2,8%) patients. In total, 8 (4,4%) patients tested positive for COVID-19. Data also shows a greater number of therapeutic changes in cases of ovarian cancer as well as a cancelation of a lumbo-aortic lymphadenectomy in one patient with cervical cancer. Hospital consultants estimated a direct detrimental impact of the COVID-19 pandemic for 39 patients, representing 22% of gynecological cancers. CONCLUSION: This study provided observational data of the impact of the COVID-19 health crisis on the surgical management of gynecological cancers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Databases, Factual , Female , France/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/classification , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/pathology , History, 21st Century , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Ovarian Res ; 14(1): 35, 2021 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090643

ABSTRACT

China and the rest of the world are experiencing an outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Patients with cancer are more susceptible to viral infection and are more likely to develop severe complications, as compared to healthy individuals. The growing spread of COVID-19 presents challenges for the clinical care of patients with gynecological malignancies. Ovarian debulking surgery combined with the frequent need for chemotherapy is most likely why ovarian cancer was rated as the gynecologic cancer most affected by COVID-19. Therefore, ovarian cancer presents a particular challenging task. Concerning the ovarian cancer studies with confirmed COVID-19 reported from large-scale general hospitals in Wuhan, we hold that the treatment plan was adjusted appropriately and an individualized remedy was implemented. The recommendations discussed here were developed mainly based on the experience from Wuhan. We advise that the management strategy for ovarian cancer patients should be adjusted in the light of the local epidemic situation and formulated according to the pathological type, tumor stage and the current treatment phase. Online medical service is an effective and convenient communication platform during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Ovarian Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Female , Gynecology/methods , Hospitals, General , Humans , Medical Oncology/methods , Ovarian Neoplasms/diagnosis , Ovarian Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
EPMA J ; 11(2): 289-309, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1086691

ABSTRACT

RELEVANCE: Ivermectin, as an old anti-parasite drug, can suppress almost completely the growth of various human cancers, including ovarian cancer (OC). However, its anticancer mechanism remained to be further studied at the molecular levels. Ivermectin-related molecule-panel changes will serve a useful tool for its personalized drug therapy and prognostic assessment in OCs. PURPOSE: To explore the functional significance of ivermectin-mediated lncRNA-EIF4A3-mRNA axes in OCs and ivermectin-related molecule-panel for its personalized drug therapy monitoring. METHODS: Based on our previous study, a total of 16 lncRNA expression patterns were analyzed using qRT-PCR before and after ivermectin-treated different OC cell lines (TOV-21G and A2780). Stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics was used to analyze the protein expressions of EIF4A3 and EIF4A3-binding mRNAs in ovarian cancer cells treated with and without ivermectin. A total of 411 OC patients from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database with the selected lncRNA expressions and the corresponding clinical data were included. Lasso regression was constructed to examine the relationship between lncRNA signature and OC survival risk. The overall survival analysis between high-risk and low-risk groups used the Kaplan-Meier method. Heatmap showed the correlation between risk groups and clinical characteristics. The univariate and multivariate models were established with Cox regression. RESULTS: SILAC-based quantitative proteomics found the protein expression levels of EIF4A3 and 116 EIF4A3-binding mRNAs were inhibited by ivermectin in OC cells. Among the analyzed 16 lncRNAs (HCG15, KIF9-AS1, PDCD4-AS1, ZNF674-AS1, ZNRF3-AS1, SOS1-IT1, LINC00565, SNHG3, PLCH1-AS1, WWTR1-AS1, LINC00517, AL109767.1, STARD13-IT1, LBX2-AS1, LEMD1-AS1, and HOXC-AS3), only 7 lncRNAs (HCG15, KIF9-AS1, PDCD4-AS1, ZNF674-AS1, ZNRF3-AS1, SOS1-IT1, and LINC00565) were obtained for further lasso regression when combined with the results of drug testing and overall survival analysis. Lasso regression identified the prognostic model of ivermectin-related three-lncRNA signature (ZNRF3-AS1, SOS1-IT1, and LINC00565). The high-risk and low-risk groups based on the prognostic model were significantly related to overall survival and clinicopathologic characteristics (survival status, lymphatic invasion, cancer status, and clinical stage) in OC patients and remained independent risk factors according to multivariate COX analysis (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Those findings provided the potential targeted lncRNA-EIF4A3-mRNA pathways of ivermectin in OC, and constructed the effective prognostic model, which benefits discovery of novel mechanism of ivermectin to suppress ovarian cancer cells, and the ivermectin-related molecule-panel changes benefit for its personalized drug therapy and prognostic assessment towards its predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine (PPPM) in OCs.

6.
J Surg Oncol ; 122(2): 122-123, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064394

ABSTRACT

At the beginning of 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spreads worldwide. Patients with ovarian cancer should be considered at high-risk of developing severe morbidity related to COVID-19. Most of them are diagnosed in advanced stages of disease, and they are fragile. Here, we evaluated the major impact of COVID-19 on patients with ovarian cancer, discussing the effect of the outbreak on medical and surgical treatment.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Ovarian Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Surgical Oncology/methods , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Laparoscopy/methods , Laparoscopy/standards , Ovarian Neoplasms/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Oncology/standards
7.
Case Rep Infect Dis ; 2020: 8878069, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021161

ABSTRACT

Background. Mycobacterium neoaurum is a rapidly growing nontuberculosis mycobacterium (NTM) that was first isolated from soil in 1972 and is ubiquitous in soil, water, and dust. The first reported case of human infection by M. neoaurum was published in 1988, presenting as a Hickman catheter-related bacteremia in a patient with ovarian cancer. M. neoaurum has since been recognized as a source of predominantly opportunistic bloodstream infections in immunocompromised hosts. We report the case of an adult diabetic male with M. neoaurum bloodstream infection secondary to an infected venous-access port that had been implanted nearly six years prior for temporary chemotherapy. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old male with schizophrenia, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a history of excision and chemotherapy to treat adenocarcinoma of the colon 6 years prior, presented with fever and behavioral changes. He was found to have a M. neoaurum bloodstream infection secondary to his implanted subclavian port. Multiple preoperative blood cultures, as well as the removed catheter tip culture, were positive for M. neoaurum. The patient's condition improved to near premorbid levels after port removal and 6 weeks of targeted antimicrobial therapy. Discussion and Conclusions. Bloodstream infections due to rapidly growing NTM, such as M. neoaurum, have been infrequently reported; however, improved isolation and identification techniques based on genomic testing are resulting in a more in-depth recognition of these widely scattered environmental microbes in human infections. Nonetheless, lengthy identification and susceptibility processes remain a diagnostic and treatment barrier. Patients such as ours who have a history of malignancy and an indwelling foreign body have most often been reported as acquiring M. neoaurum bacteremia. Fortunately, device removal and appropriate antimicrobial therapy guided by susceptibility data is often enough to manage these atypical mycobacterial infections.

8.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 223(5): 725.e1-725.e9, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966642

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented challenges for the oncology community. For people living with cancer, treatments are interrupted, surgeries cancelled, and regular oncology evaluations rescheduled. People with cancer and their physicians must balance plausible fears of coronavirus disease 2019 and cancer treatment with the consequences of delaying cancer care. OBJECTIVE: We aim to evaluate the experience of women with ovarian cancer during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: Women with a current or previous diagnosis of ovarian cancer completed an online survey focusing on treatment interruptions and quality of life. The quality of life was measured with the Cancer Worry Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The survey was distributed through survivor networks and social media. Univariate and multivariable linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the effect of participant characteristics on quality of life survey scores. RESULTS: A total of 603 women, from 41 states, visited the survey website between March 30, 2020, and April 13, 2020, and 555 (92.0%) completed the survey. The median age was 58 years (range, 20-85). At the time of survey completion, 217 participants (43.3%) were in active treatment. A total of 175 participants (33%) experienced a delay in some component of their cancer care. Ten (26.3%) of the 38 participants scheduled for surgery experienced a delay, as did 18 (8.3%) of the 217 participants scheduled for nonsurgical cancer treatment. A total of 133 participants (24.0%) had a delayed physician appointment, 84 (15.1%) laboratory tests, and 53 (9.6%) cancer-related imaging. Among the cohort, 88.6% (489) reported significant cancer worry, 51.4% (285) borderline or abnormal anxiety, and 26.5% (147) borderline or abnormal depression. On univariate analysis, age less than 65 years, being scheduled for cancer treatment or cancer surgery, delay in oncology care, being self-described as immunocompromised, and use of telemedicine were all associated with higher levels of cancer worry. Higher anxiety scores were associated with age less than 65 years and being self-described as immunocompromised. Higher depression scores were associated with age less than 65 years, being scheduled for cancer surgery, delay in oncology care, being self-described as immunocompromised, and use of telemedicine. On multivariable linear regression analysis, age less than 65 and being self-described as immunocompromised were independently predictive of greater cancer worry, anxiety, and depression, and delay in cancer care was predictive of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSION: The coronavirus disease 2019 crisis is affecting care of patients with ovarian cancer; surgeries, treatments, scheduled physician appointments, laboratory tests, and imaging are cancelled or delayed. Younger age, presumed immunocompromise, and delay in cancer care were associated with significantly higher levels of cancer worry, anxiety, and depression. Providers must work with patients to balance competing risks of coronavirus disease 2019 and cancer, recognizing that communication is a critical clinical tool to improve quality of life in these times.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Ovarian Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Quality of Life/psychology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Young Adult
9.
J Ovarian Res ; 13(1): 105, 2020 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The number of cases of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Japan have risen since the first case was reported on January 24, 2020, and 6225 infections have been reported as of June 30, 2020. On April 8, 2020, our hospital began screening patients via pre-admission reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and chest computed tomography (CT). Although no patients exhibited apparent pneumonia, treatment delay or changes in treatment plans were required for a few patients based on the results of screening tests. During an emerging infectious disease pandemic, the likelihood of being infected, as well as the disease itself, affects clinical decision making in several ways. We summarized and presented our experience. CASE PRESENTATION: After the introduction of pre-admission screening, RT-PCR and CT were performed in 200 and 76 patients, respectively, as of June 30, 2020. The treatment of five patients, including two patients with cervical cancer, two patients with ovarian tumors, and one patient with ovarian cancer, was affected by the results. Two asymptomatic RT-PCR-positive patients did not develop COVID-19, but their treatment was delayed until the confirmation of negative results. The other three patients were RT-PCR-negative, but abnormal CT findings suggested the possibility of COVID-19, which delayed treatment. The patients receiving first-line preoperative chemotherapy for ovarian cancer had clinically evident exacerbations because of the treatment delay. CONCLUSION: During the epidemic phase of an emerging infectious disease, we found that COVID-19 has several other effects besides its incidence. The postponing treatment was the most common, therefore, treatment of ovarian tumors and ovarian cancer was considered to be the most likely to be affected among gynecological diseases. Protocols that allow for easy over-diagnosis can be disadvantageous, mainly because of treatment delays, and therefore, the protocols must be developed in light of the local infection situation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Cancer Care Facilities , Clinical Decision-Making , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment , Tokyo/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
10.
J Gynecol Oncol ; 31(5): e87, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736759

ABSTRACT

This corrects the article on p. e65 in vol. 31, PMID: 32342678.

11.
Gynecol Oncol Rep ; 33: 100615, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688921

ABSTRACT

•Chemotherapy resumption after convalescence from COVID-19 is safe and feasible.•No guidelines exist for resumption of chemotherapy in patients with COVID-19.•Cancer patients on chemotherapy may develop SARS-CoV-2 antibodies less frequently.

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