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1.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754860

RESUMO

This content provides clinicians and public health professionals with key information and evidence for clinical considerations when diagnosing and managing pediatric patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. For evidence-based treatment recommendations for COVID-19, visit the National Institutes of Health (NIH) COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines prepared by the COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel. Also see the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Critical Updates on COVID-19 and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Variants of the Virus and Vaccines for COVID-19. ;;Summary of Recent Changes ;;Revisions were made on October 17, 2022, to include new information about COVID-19 relevant for pediatric healthcare providers. ;View Previous Updates ;;On This Page ;Incidence ;Incubation Period and Clinical Presentation ;Severity and Underlying Medical Conditions ;Testing, Diagnosis, and Recommendations for Isolation ;Laboratory and Radiographic Findings ;Management of Illness ;Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) ;Post-COVID Conditions (PCCs) ;Considerations for Routine Pediatric Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic ;References

2.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754859

RESUMO

What You Need to Know ;When testing for current COVID-19, the CDC recommends that clinicians use viral tests that detect SARS-CoV-2, not a serologic test, which detects antibodies. ;Testing is important to identify and help reduce the spread of COVID-19 (see diagnostic tests for COVID-19). Viral tests, including NAAT and antigen tests, are used to diagnose COVID-19. Antibody tests (serology) are not indicated to diagnose a current infection. NAATs that use reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology to detect SARS-CoV-2 ribonucleic acid (RNA) are highly sensitive and specific and detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in respiratory specimens. Clinical RT-PCR tests for SARS-CoV-2 that determine the cycle threshold (Ct) value are not validated to estimate viral load, and the NIH recommends that Ct values may be considered only in consultation with an infectious disease expert. ;;SARS-CoV-2 antigen tests typically provide rapid results and are less expensive than NAATs, but they are generally less sensitive than NAATs. Antigen tests for SARS-CoV-2 use immunoassays to detect the presence of a specific viral antigen in respiratory specimens, and include point-of-care, laboratory-based, and self-tests. A negative antigen test in persons with signs or symptoms of COVID-19 should be confirmed by NAAT. For more information, see the Antigen Test Algorithm. ;;Specific recommendations on testing strategies in various clinical situations and information on SARS-CoV-2 molecular and antigen assays (including COVID-19 self-tests) that have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) are available, see: FDA’s COVID-19 In Vitro Diagnostics EUAs, CDC’s Overview of Testing for SARS-CoV-2, CDC’s Interim Guidance for Antigen Testing for SARS-CoV-2, and the NIH’s Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Infection which describes testing recommendations, including guidance on the use of Ct values.

3.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754858

RESUMO

There is medicine you can take if you get very sick from COVID-19. ;Taking medicine can help you stay out of the hospital. ;Call your doctor right away if you get sick with COVID-19. ;It is important to take the medicine right away. ;;Who Should Take Medicine for COVID-19? ;A woman is covering her nose with a tissue and checking her temperature on a thermometer. ;Most people with COVID-19 have mild symptoms. ;You can buy medicines from the drug store if you feel bad. ;These medicines include Tylenol, Motrin, and Advil. ;;Some people may get very sick from COVID-19. ;Medicines from the drug store are not enough. ;A doctor can prescribe COVID-19 medicine for these people. ;Medicine helps keep these people from going to the hospital. ;These medicines include Paxlovid and Lagevrio. ;;Who May Get Very Sick from COVID-19? ;A group of people are shown who have different reasons they may get very sick from COVID-19. The people who are older, group includes people with disabilities, people who have weak immune systems, people who have serious health problems, people who are pregnant, and people who have not gotten the COVID-19 shot. ;People who are 50 years old or older may get very sick. ;People with disabilities may get very sick. ;People with weak immune systems may get very sick. ;People with serious health problems may get very sick. ;Pregnant people may get very sick. ;People who have not gotten a COVID-19 shot may get very sick. ;If this sounds like you and you get COVID-19, call your doctor right away. ;;How Can I Get Medicine? ;A woman is at her doctor’s office wearing a mask and is talking to her doctor who is also masked. The woman is holding a brochure about COVID-19 medicine. ;If you test positive for COVID-19, ask your doctor about medicine. ;Tell your doctor if you are taking any other medicines. ;Your doctor will help decide if COVID-19 medicine is right for you. ;;You can also visit a “Test to Treat” location. ;These locations offer testing and medicine all in one place. ;If treatment is right for you, you can get medicine right then. ;Call 1-800-232-0233 (TTY 888-720-7489) to find a location near you. ;;When Should I Get Medicine? ;A woman is at home and calling her doctor over the phone. ;Call your doctor right away if you get sick with COVID-19. ;Start the medicine within a few days of getting sick. ;The medicine works best if you start it right away.

4.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754857

RESUMO

Added COVID-19 vaccination for eligible populations. ;Updated Quarantine and Isolation Guidelines link. ;Added disclaimer regarding the CDC quarantine, isolation, and testing guidance. ; ;;View Previous Updates ;;Key Points ;Adapt immunization strategies to the vaccine-preventable disease risks and COVID-19 situation in your country. ;Engage with communities and implement communication strategies to make people aware that routine vaccines are available. ;Use the immunization information systems in your country to monitor who missed routine vaccines and to inform your catch-up vaccination strategies. ;On This Page ;Background ;Implementation of routine immunization services during COVID-19 ;Background ;Routine immunization services have been disrupted significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, threatening achievements in the fight against major vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) like polio, yellow fever, and measles. According to new data, 60 lifesaving immunization campaigns are currently postponed in 50 countries, putting around 228 million people – mostly children – at risk for preventable infectious diseases. Over half of the 50 countries affected by these interruptions are in Africa, highlighting protracted inequities in access to critical immunization services [1]. ;;Routine immunization is the sustainable, reliable, and timely interaction between the vaccine, those who deliver it, and those who receive it to ensure every person is fully immunized against VPDs. Examples of routine immunizations are childhood vaccination against diphtheria, measles, polio, tetanus, meningitis, pertussis, and adulthood vaccination against flu and tetanus. ;;In many countries, routine immunization services have been disrupted due to: ;;Unavailability of healthcare workers because of their deployment to the COVID-19 response. ;Lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) to conduct immunization activities. ;Healthcare workers’ fear about contracting COVID-19. ;Interrupted supply of vaccines due to COVID-19 related closure of country borders. ;Unwillingness or inability of parents to leave their homes due to fear of COVID-19. ;The following guidance is meant to supplement but not replace any local health and safety laws, rules, and regulations. It is intended for CDC country offices, immunization program managers, and staff from partner immunization programs.

5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754856

RESUMO

Combines and replaces previous CDC guidance documents for COVID-19 in homeless service sites and correctional and detention facilities. ;Describes tailored everyday and enhanced COVID-19 prevention strategies. ;Recommends adding enhanced COVID-19 prevention strategies when the COVID-19 Community Levels are high (previously medium) or when there are facility-specific risks. ;No longer routinely recommends quarantine after someone is exposed to a person with COVID-19. Continues to provide considerations for facilities that prefer to continue implementing quarantine protocols. ;Includes an option to end isolation for people with COVID-19 after 7 days with a negative viral test. ;Emphasizes the importance of maximizing access to in-person visitation to promote correctional and detention facility residents’ mental health and well-being. ;Because of the congregate living arrangements in homeless shelters and correctional and detention facilities, the risk of COVID-19 transmission is higher in these settings compared with the general population. In addition, there is a high prevalence of certain medical conditions associated with severe COVID-19 among people experiencing homelessness and among people who are incarcerated, increasing the risk for severe outcomes from COVID-19 in these populations. ;;This guidance can be used to inform COVID-19 prevention actions in homeless service sites and correctional and detention facilities and replaces previous CDC guidance documents for these settings. ;; For Healthcare Professionals: This guidance does not apply to dedicated patient care areas within these settings. Any healthcare workers who provide care in these settings should follow Infection Control Recommendations for Healthcare Personnel. ;;On This Page ;Assessing a Facility's Risk ;COVID-19 Prevention Strategies ;Quarantine ;Personal Protective Equipment and Source Control ;Identifying Exposures ;Additional Considerations ;Assessing a Facility’s Risk ;CDC recommends that homeless service sites and correctional and detention facilities use a combination of COVID-19 Community Levels and facility-specific risks to guide decisions about when to apply specific COVID-19 prevention actions. Assessing the following factors can help decide if additional layers of protection are needed because of facility-specific risks: ;;Facility structural and operational characteristics: Assess whether facility characteristics or operations contribute to COVID-19 spread. For example, facilities may have a higher risk of transmission if they have frequent resident or staff turnover, a high volume of outside visitors, poor ventilation, or areas where many people sleep close together. ;Risk of severe health outcomes: Assess what portion of people in the facility are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19, for example, due to underlying health conditions, older age, pregnancy, or poor access to medical care. ;COVID-19 transmission in the facility: Assess the extent to which transmission is occurring within the facility. Transmission can be assessed through diagnostic testing of people with COVID-19 symptoms and their close contacts, through routine screening testing (not routinely recommended, but some facilities might use it in consultation with their health department to facilitate early identification of infections in populations with especially high risk for severe illness from COVID-19), or other surveillance testing that the facility uses (such as wastewater testing). Results of testing at intake are not recommended as an indicator of transmission inside the facility, since infections identified at intake most likely occurred elsewhere.

6.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754855

RESUMO

What You Need to Know ;Facilities that serve unrelated people who live in close proximity and share at least one common room (e.g., group or personal care homes and assisted living facilities) should apply prevention strategies based on COVID-19 Community Levels for their general operations. ;Healthcare services delivered in these settings should be informed by CDC’s Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations. ;Facilities can also assess the unique risks of their setting and the populations they serve and use enhanced COVID-19 prevention strategies, described below, to help reduce the impact of COVID-19. ;Facility operators should balance the need for COVID-19 prevention with the impact from reducing access to daily services and programming. Facilities may not be able to apply all enhanced COVID-19 prevention strategies due to local resources, facility and population characteristics, and/or other factors. Therefore, they can add combinations of these enhanced prevention strategies as feasible for a layered approach to increase the level of protection.

7.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754854

RESUMO

What You Need to Know ;When testing for current COVID-19, the CDC recommends that clinicians use viral tests that detect SARS-CoV-2, not a serologic test, which detects antibodies. ;Testing is important to identify and help reduce the spread of COVID-19 (see diagnostic tests for COVID-19). Viral tests, including NAAT and antigen tests, are used to diagnose COVID-19. Antibody tests (serology) are not indicated to diagnose a current infection. NAATs that use reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology to detect SARS-CoV-2 ribonucleic acid (RNA) are highly sensitive and specific and detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in respiratory specimens. Clinical RT-PCR tests for SARS-CoV-2 that determine the cycle threshold (Ct) value are not validated to estimate viral load, and the NIH recommends that Ct values may be considered only in consultation with an infectious disease expert. ;;SARS-CoV-2 antigen tests typically provide rapid results and are less expensive than NAATs, but they are generally less sensitive than NAATs. Antigen tests for SARS-CoV-2 use immunoassays to detect the presence of a specific viral antigen in respiratory specimens, and include point-of-care, laboratory-based, and self-tests. A negative antigen test in persons with signs or symptoms of COVID-19 should be confirmed by NAAT. For more information, see the Antigen Test Algorithm. ;;Specific recommendations on testing strategies in various clinical situations and information on SARS-CoV-2 molecular and antigen assays (including COVID-19 self-tests) that have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) are available, see: FDA’s COVID-19 In Vitro Diagnostics EUAs, CDC’s Overview of Testing for SARS-CoV-2, CDC’s Interim Guidance for Antigen Testing for SARS-CoV-2, and the NIH’s Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Infection which describes testing recommendations, including guidance on the use of Ct values.

8.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754659

RESUMO

Summary of recent changes (last updated September 2, 2022) Updated guidance for observation periods following COVID-19 vaccination Key Points Anaphylaxis, an acute and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, has been reported rarely following COVID-19 vaccination. Under the Emergency Use Authorizations for COVID-19 vaccines, appropriate medical treatment for severe allergic reactions must be immediately available at any site administering the vaccine in the event that an acute anaphylactic reaction occurs following administration of a COVID-19 vaccine. These interim considerations provide information on preparing for the initial assessment and potential management of anaphylaxis following COVID-19 vaccination. On This Page Personnel, medications, and supplies for assessing and managing anaphylaxis Post-vaccination observation periods Early recognition of anaphylaxis Management of anaphylaxis at a COVID-19 vaccination location Considerations for anaphylaxis management in special populations Patient counseling Reporting anaphylaxis Additional resources References Appendix Previous Updates Overview Anaphylaxis, an acute and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, has been reported rarely following COVID-19 vaccination. These interim considerations provide recommendations on assessment and potential management of anaphylaxis following COVID-19 vaccination. Detailed information on CDC recommendations for vaccination, including contraindications and precautions to vaccination, can be found in the Clinical Considerations for Use of COVID-19 Vaccines Currently Authorized in the United States. Patients should be screened prior to receipt of each vaccine dose, and those with a contraindication should not be vaccinated. A COVID-19 prevaccination questionnaire [6 pages] is available to assist with screening.

9.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754658

RESUMO

CDC’s COVID-19 Community Levels recommendations do not apply in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes. Instead, healthcare settings should continue to use community transmission rates and continue to follow CDC’s infection prevention and control recommendations for healthcare settings. This page is intended for use by healthcare professionals who are caring for people in the community setting under isolation with COVID-19. For more information for the general population in the community, please see Isolation and Precautions for People with COVID-19. These recommendations do not apply to healthcare personnel in the healthcare setting, and do not supersede state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations. For healthcare settings, please see Managing Healthcare Personnel with SARS-CoV-2 Infection or Exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and Interim Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations for Healthcare Personnel. For more details, including details on certain non-healthcare settings, please review Setting-Specific Guidance. Summary of Recent Changes Updated guidance reflects new recommendations for isolation and precautions for people with COVID-19. Removed Assessment for Duration of Isolation and Key Findings From Transmission Literature sections so page provides most current information. View Previous Updates Key Points People who are infected but asymptomatic or people with mild COVID-19 should isolate through at least day 5 (day 0 is the day symptoms appeared or the date the specimen was collected for the positive test for people who are asymptomatic). They should wear a mask through day 10. A test-based strategy may be used to remove a mask sooner. People with moderate or severe COVID-19 should isolate through at least day 10. Those with severe COVID-19 may remain infectious beyond 10 days and may need to extend isolation for up to 20 days. People who are moderately or severely immunocompromised should isolate through at least day 20. Use of serial testing and consultation with an infectious disease specialist is recommended in these patients prior to ending isolation.

10.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754234

RESUMO

Added new language on ordering swabs and media, assessing specimens obtained through self-collection, and transporting specimens through pneumatic tube systems. View Previous Updates Key Points The type of specimen collected when testing for current or past infection with SARS-CoV-2 is based on the test being performed and its manufacturer’s instructions. Some of the specimen types listed below will not be appropriate for all tests. For initial diagnostic testing for current SARS-CoV-2 infections, CDC recommends collecting and testing an upper respiratory specimen. This guidance is intended for healthcare providers or health department staff who are collecting specimens from others in a healthcare setting or at the point-of-care. Guidance for self-collection of specimens can be found here. CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about who should be tested are at the discretion of State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial (STLT) health departments and/or healthcare providers. Testing for other pathogens by the provider should be done as part of the initial evaluation, as indicated, but should not delay testing for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. On This Page Collecting and Handling Specimens Safely Respiratory Specimen Collection Assessing Validity of Specimens Obtained Through Self-Collection Handling Bulk-Packaged Sterile Swabs Properly for Upper Respiratory Specimen Collection Storing and Shipping Respiratory Specimens Capillary Fingerstick Specimen Collection Additional Resources Collecting and Handling Specimens Safely For healthcare providers collecting specimens or working within 6 feet of patients suspected to be infected with SARS-CoV-2, maintain proper infection control and use recommended personal protective equipment (PPE), which includes an N95 or higher-level respirator (or face mask if a respirator is not available), eye protection, gloves, and a gown. For healthcare providers who are handling specimens, but are not directly involved in collection (e.g. handling self-collected specimens) and not working within 6 feet of the patient, follow Standard Precautions. Healthcare providers should wear a form of source control (face mask) at all times while in the healthcare facility. Healthcare providers can minimize PPE use if patients collect their own specimens while maintaining at least 6 feet of separation. For example, the provider should wear a face mask, gloves, and a gown.

11.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2022.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-754224

RESUMO

Guiding Principles Reduce health disparities. Use data-driven approaches. Foster meaningful engagement with community institutions and diverse leaders. Lead culturally responsive outreach. Reduce stigma, including stigma associated with race and ethnicity. Vision All people have the opportunity to attain the highest level of health possible. Charge To reduce the disproportionate burden of COVID-19 among populations at increased risk for infection, severe illness, and death. To broadly address health disparities and inequities related to COVID-19 with a holistic, all-of-response approach. To develop a strategic plan to help us realize these goals. Overview Achieving health equity requires valuing everyone equally with focused and ongoing efforts to address avoidable inequities, historical and contemporary injustices, and the elimination of health and healthcare disparities. The population health impact of COVID-19 has exposed longstanding inequities that have systematically undermined the physical, social, economic, and emotional health of racial and ethnic minority populations and other population groups that are bearing a disproportionate burden of COVID-19. Persistent health disparities combined with historic housing patterns, work circumstances, and other factors have put members of some racial and ethnic minority populations at higher risk for COVID-19 infection, severe illness, and death. As we continue to learn more about the impact of COVID-19 on the health of different populations, immediate action is critical to reduce growing COVID-19 disparities among the populations known to be at disproportionate risk. CDC’s COVID-19 Response Health Equity Strategy broadly seeks to improve the health outcomes of populations disproportionately affected by focusing on four priorities: Expanding the evidence base. Expanding programs and practices for testing, contact tracing, isolation, healthcare, and recovery from the impact of unintended negative consequences of mitigation strategies in order to reach populations that have been put at increased risk. Examples of potential unintended negative consequences include loss of health insurance;food, housing, and income insecurity;mental health concerns;substance use;and violence resulting from factors like social isolation, financial stress, and anxiety. Expanding program and practice activities to support essential and frontline workers to prevent transmission of COVID-19. Examples of essential and frontline workers include healthcare, food industry, and correctional facility workers. Expanding an inclusive workforce equipped to assess and address the needs of an increasingly diverse U.S. population.

12.
ClinicalTrials.gov; 28/03/2022; TrialID: NCT05313646
Clinical Trial Register | ICTRP | ID: ictrp-NCT05313646

RESUMO

Condition:

COVID-19

Intervention:

Biological: batch 1 of Ad5-nCoV;Biological: batch 2 of Ad5-nCoV;Biological: batch 3 of Ad5-nCoV

Primary outcome:

GMTs of SARS-CoV-2 RBD-specific binding IgG on day 28 after vaccination.

Criteria:


Inclusion Criteria:

1. healthy participants aged 18 years and above who have not received COVID-19 vaccine.

2. The subjects can provide with informed consent and sign informed consent form (ICF).

4. The subjects are able to and willing to comply with the requirements of the clinical
trial program and could complete the follow-up of the study.

5. Axillary temperature = 37.0?. 6. negative IgM and IgG against SARS-CoV-2 7. with BMI
between18.5 to 30.0 8. No history of epidemiological contact with COVID-2019 9. have not
been to medium or high risk areas in the past 21 days and have no history of departure.

10. be determined to be healthy by medical history, physical examination and clinical
examination and meet the requirements for immunization of this product.

Exclusion criteria:

1. Medical history or family history of convulsion, epilepsy, encephalopathy and
psychosis.

2. Allergic to any component of the research vaccines, or a history of hypersensitivity
or serious reactions to vaccination.

3. Women with positive urine pregnancy test, pregnant or breast-feeding, or have a
pregnancy plan in this study.

4. Suffering from acute febrile disease, infectious disease, or SARS infection history

5. Serious cardiovascular disease, such as arrhythmia, conduction block, myocardial
infarction, severe hypertension, which cannot be controlled by medication (systolic
blood pressure =180mmHg, diastolic blood pressure =110mmHg)

6. Have severe chronic diseases or unstable condition ( Grade 3 or higher as defined in
the guidelines for the classification of adverse events in clinical trials for
prophylactic vaccines), Such as diabetes, thyroid disease and so on.

7. Congenital or acquired angioedema / neuroedema.

8. had urticaria one year before this vaccination.

9. Asplenia or functional asplenia.

10. Thrombocytopenia or other clotting disorder (this may contraindicate intramuscular
injection).

11. Faintng during acupuncture treatment

12. Received immunosuppressant therapy, antiallergic therapy, cytotoxic therapy, high dose
inhaled corticosteroid over the past 6 months (excluding corticosteroid spray for
allergic rhinitis, surface corticosteroid for acute non-complicated dermatitis, and
corticosteroid with dose less than 20mg/ day)

13. Received blood products within 4 months before vaccination.

14. Received other investigational drugs within 1 month prior to receiving the
investigational vaccines.

15. Received other live attenuated vaccines within 1 month prior to receiving the
investigational vaccines.

16. Received subunit or inactivated vaccine within 14 days prior to receiving
investigational vaccine.

17. Be receiving anti-tuberculosis treatment

18. Have the history of SARS-CoV-2 infection or COVID-19

19. Any medical, psychological, social or other conditions that, in the investigator's
judgment, are inconsistent with the study protocol or affect the subjects' informed
consent


13.
14.
ClinicalTrials.gov; 18/03/2022; TrialID: NCT05298800
Clinical Trial Register | ICTRP | ID: ictrp-NCT05298800

RESUMO

Condition:

Safety;Immunogenicity, Vaccine;COVID-19 Vaccines;Influenza Vaccines;Pneumococcal Vaccines

Intervention:

Biological: Vaccine

Primary outcome:

Seroconversion rate of neutralizing antibody

Criteria:


Inclusion Criteria:

- Healthy adults 18 years old and older

- Over 6 months after primary immunization with COVID-19 vaccines

- Can understand and sign the consent

- Can provide effective personal identification

Exclusion Criteria:

- Has a history of COVID-19 infection

- Less than 6 months after primary immunization with COVID-19 vaccines

- Already vaccinated with influenza vaccines of that year

- Vaccinated with pneumococcal vaccines within 5 years

- Has a history of severe hypersensitivity reaction to vaccines

- Has uncontrolled seizure or other severe neural system illnesses

- Has a fever, chronic disease, or acute disease during immunization

- Gestation period, lactation period, or planning to get pregnant within 3 months

- Administrated with other drugs under research within 30 days before vaccination

- Received attenuated vaccines within 14 days before vaccination

- Received subunit vaccines or inactivated vaccines within 7 days before vaccination

- Other conditions based on researcher's judgement


15.
ClinicalTrials.gov; 21/01/2022; TrialID: NCT05204589
Clinical Trial Register | ICTRP | ID: ictrp-NCT05204589

RESUMO

Condition:

COVID-19

Intervention:

Biological: Aerosolized Ad5-nCoV;Biological: Inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine

Primary outcome:

Incidence of adverse reactions within 28 days after the booster dose.;GMT of neutralizing antibodies against live SARS-CoV-2 virus on day 28 after the booster dose in immunogenicity cohort.

Criteria:


Inclusion Criteria:

- Health subjects aged =18 years.

- Have received two-dose inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine before 6 months or more.

- The subject can provide with informed consent and sign informed consent form (ICF).

- The subjects are able to and willing to comply with the requirements of the clinical
trial program and could complete the 6-month follow-up of the study.

Exclusion Criteria:

- Have the medical history or family history of convulsion, epilepsy, encephalopathy and
psychosis.

- Be allergic to any component of the research vaccines, or used to have a history of
hypersensitivity or serious reactions to vaccination.

- Women with positive urine pregnancy test.

- Have acute febrile diseases and infectious diseases.

- Axillary temperature>37.0?.

- Have serious cardiovascular disease, such as arrhythmia, conduction block, myocardial
infarction, severe hypertension that cannot be controlled by medication (systolic
blood pressure =180mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure =110mmHg when measured in the
field).

- Have severe chronic diseases or condition in progress cannot be smoothly controlled,
such as asthma, diabetes, thyroid disease.

- Congenital or acquired angioedema / neuroedema.

- Have the history of urticaria 1 year before receiving the investigational vaccine.

- Have asplenia or functional asplenia.

- Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary fibrosis and other
pulmonary abnormalities.

- Have history of SARS-CoV-2 infection or COVID-19.

- Have symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection.

- Have traveled to medium or high risk areas or traveled abroad in the past 21 days, and
epidemiologically contacted with SARS-CoV-2.

- Any medical, psychological, social, or other conditions that, in the investigator's
judgment, are inconsistent with the protocol or affect the subject's informed consent.


16.
ClinicalTrials.gov; 03/12/2021; TrialID: NCT05148949
Clinical Trial Register | ICTRP | ID: ictrp-NCT05148949
17.
ClinicalTrials.gov; 19/10/2021; TrialID: NCT05087277
Clinical Trial Register | ICTRP | ID: ictrp-NCT05087277

RESUMO

Condition:

COVID-19

Primary outcome:

Neutralizing capabilities to variant COVID-19 after primary and booster vaccination;Titer of Subclass of IgG after primary and booster vaccination

Criteria:


Inclusion Criteria:

- Between the ages of 18 and 59

- Healthy

- No vaccination with COVID-19 before become participant

- Agreed to take a blood sample

Exclusion Criteria:

- who cannot take the COVID-19 vaccine due to some personal reasons

- history of SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, or Middle East respiratory syndrome infection

- high-risk epidemiology history within 14 days before enrolment (eg, travel or
residence history in communities with case reports, or contact history with someone
infected with SARS-CoV-2)

- axillary temperature of more than 37·0?

- history of allergy to any vaccine component.


18.
ClinicalTrials.gov; 29/09/2021; TrialID: NCT05072496
Clinical Trial Register | ICTRP | ID: ictrp-NCT05072496

RESUMO

Condition:

COVID-19

Primary outcome:

Durability of humoral and cellular immune responses

Criteria:


Inclusion Criteria:

- Working at the CDC

- Between the ages of 18 and 59

- Healthy

- Not vaccinated with COVID-19 vaccine

- Agreed to take a blood sample

Exclusion Criteria:

- who cannot take the COVID-19 vaccine due to some personal reasons

- history of SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, or Middle East respiratory syndrome infection

- high-risk epidemiology history within 14 days before enrolment (eg, travel or
residence history in communities with case reports, or contact history with someone
infected with SARS-CoV-2)

- axillary temperature of more than 37·0?

- history of allergy to any vaccine component.


19.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: covidwho-1426761

RESUMO

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined that vaccination is an important tool to help stop the COVID-19 pandemic and up until now the ACIP recommendations for phased allocation have provided guidance for federal, state, and local jurisdictions while vaccine supply was limited. However, given substantial increases in the supply of vaccines, it is appropriate to transition beyond priority groups and allow broad eligibility for receipt of COVID-19 vaccines consistent with applicable Emergency Use Authorizations. The following information provides eligibility guidance for federal, state, and local jurisdictions as well as those enrolled in the federal pharmacy program. people icon Eligibility Guidance HHS Directive on Eligibility to Receive COVID-19 Vaccinespdf icon CDC COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force Position on Citizenship and Residency Federal Retail Pharmacy Program Information Key Operational Considerations for Jurisdictions Planning to Operate COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics To meet vaccination goals, jurisdictions are planning for and operating multiple, temporary, large- and small-scale vaccination sites, both fixed location and mobile, as strategies to vaccinate more of the population rapidly. This guidance provides information that informs the planning and operations of all types and sizes of vaccination clinics, including key considerations to maximize throughput at vaccination sites in large venues, drive-through vaccination clinics, and smaller-scale mobile vaccination venues. Jurisdictions can use this printable PDF to begin planning for, optimizing, and maximizing vaccinations in a variety of temporary vaccination sites.

20.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2021.
Não convencional em Inglês | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | ID: grc-747563

RESUMO

As part of the COVID-19 vaccination planning process, jurisdictions are responsible for conducting outreach to providers to enroll them in the COVID-19 Vaccination Program. When enrolling providers, jurisdictions must: Ensure providers sign CDC’s COVID-19 Vaccination Program Provider Agreement (Section A) and complete the Provider Profile (Section B). Ensure providers are enrolled in the immunization information system (IIS). Ensure each provider location is entered into CDC’s Vaccine Tracking System (VTrckS). Provide training or access to training for COVID-19 vaccination providers and track completion of that training to ensure providers are ready to vaccinate as soon as vaccine becomes available. Guidance to support jurisdictions in enrolling COVID-19 vaccination providers and reporting enrollment information to CDC is provided below. This guidance does not apply to federal agencies or federal pharmacy partners. CDC has established a separate process and agreement for these entities.

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