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Relationship of resilience with occupational stress among nurses in coronavirus ward of Khatam Al-Anbia Hospital, Gonbad Kavous, 2020
Neuropsychiatria I Neuropsychologia ; 15(1-2):1-6, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-726022
ABSTRACT

Introduction:

Occupational stress is one of the predictors of psychological and physical complications among nurses. High working pressure, lack of pharmacotherapy and the rate of transmission of coronavirus are the major causes of stress in nurses in coronavirus wards. Resilience is the process of coping with stressful events. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between resilience and occupational stress among nurses in coronavirus wards. Material and

methods:

In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 150 nurses working in the coronavirus wards for at least one month were selected and examined using the available sampling method. The data collection instruments were the Demographic Questionnaire, the Connor and Davidson Resilience Questionnaire, and French's Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (ENSS).

Results:

The mean and standard deviation of occupational stress level of nurses were 147.12 +/- 27.19 and the mean and standard deviation of resilience rate of nurses were 67.43 +/- 10.25. Spearman's correlation coefficient test showed a significant and inverse relationship between occupational stress and resilience of nurses (r = -0.187, p = 0.022).

Conclusions:

The highest stressor for nurses in the coronavirus ward was the uncertainty about treatments, patients and their families. As nurses' resilience increases, so does their occupational stress. Resilience is a modifier of nursing occupational stress. To empower nurses against stress, it is recommended that resilience is taken into account in nursing education.

Full text: Available Collection: Databases of international organizations Database: WHO COVID Type of study: Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Journal: Neuropsychiatria I Neuropsychologia Year: 2020 Document Type: Article

Full text: Available Collection: Databases of international organizations Database: WHO COVID Type of study: Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Journal: Neuropsychiatria I Neuropsychologia Year: 2020 Document Type: Article