Your browser doesn't support javascript.
The early influence of COVID-19 pandemic-associated restrictions on pain, mood, and everyday life of patients with painful polyneuropathy.
Kersebaum, Dilara; Fabig, Sophie-Charlotte; Sendel, Manon; Sachau, Juliane; Lassen, Josephine; Rehm, Stefanie; Hüllemann, Philipp; Baron, Ralf; Gierthmühlen, Janne.
  • Kersebaum D; Division of Neurological Pain Research and Therapy, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany.
  • Fabig SC; Division of Neurological Pain Research and Therapy, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany.
  • Sendel M; Division of Neurological Pain Research and Therapy, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany.
  • Sachau J; Division of Neurological Pain Research and Therapy, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany.
  • Lassen J; Division of Neurological Pain Research and Therapy, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany.
  • Rehm S; Division of Neurological Pain Research and Therapy, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany.
  • Hüllemann P; Division of Neurological Pain Research and Therapy, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany.
  • Baron R; Division of Neurological Pain Research and Therapy, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany.
  • Gierthmühlen J; Division of Neurological Pain Research and Therapy, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany.
Pain Rep ; 5(6): e858, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794976
ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION:

The SARS-Cov-2 pandemic requires special attention on its psychological effects and the impact on patients with chronic pain.

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed at examining the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic-associated regulations initiated by the German government on pain intensity and characteristics, emotional well-being, and everyday life of patients with painful polyneuropathy.

METHODS:

Forty-three patients (well assessed with questionnaires before the pandemic and without change of their health status between baseline and current assessment) were investigated with validated, self-reported questionnaires and COVID-19-specific items 2 weeks after the regulations came into effect.

RESULTS:

Pain intensity remained stable or even improved like the neuropathic pain symptom inventory total score (t0 33.54 ± 20.48 vs t1 27.38 ± 16.16, P = 0.008). Only 11.6% reported a pandemic-associated pain worsening. Rumination scores of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale were lower during t1 compared to before the pandemic regulations (t0 7.81 ± 4.70, t1 6.49 ± 4.39; P = 0.030). Interestingly, pain ratings for the last 7 days were higher in patients with a changed social life compared to those without (-1.63 ± 1.60 vs 0.31 ± 1.83; P = 0.01). Quality of life was decreased and helplessness increased in those with higher pain ratings.

CONCLUSION:

Results suggest a shift of attention from the chronic pain condition towards the imminent threat of a global pandemic. As the impacts of the pandemic are persistent and evolving, the development of the measured parameters in the forthcoming weeks will be of great interest.
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Risk factors Language: English Journal: Pain Rep Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: PR9.0000000000000858

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Risk factors Language: English Journal: Pain Rep Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: PR9.0000000000000858