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1.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34571865

RESUMO

Leprosy reactional episodes are acute inflammatory events that may occur during the clinical course of the disease. Type 1 reaction (T1R) is associated with an increase in neural damage, and the understanding of the molecular pathways related to T1R onset is pivotal for the development of strategies that may effectively control the reaction. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a key cytokine associated with T1R onset and is also associated with autophagy induction. Here, we evaluated the modulation of the autophagy pathway in Mycobacterium leprae-stimulated cells in the presence or absence of IFN-γ. We observed that IFN-γ treatment promoted autophagy activation and increased the expression of genes related to the formation of phagosomes, autophagy regulation and function, or lysosomal pathways in M. leprae-stimulated cells. IFN-γ increased interleukin (IL)-15 secretion in M. leprae-stimulated THP-1 cells in a process associated with autophagy activation. We also observed higher IL15 gene expression in multibacillary (MB) patients who later developed T1R during clinical follow-up when compared to MB patients who did not develop the episode. By overlapping gene expression patterns, we observed 13 common elements shared between T1R skin lesion cells and THP-1 cells stimulated with both M. leprae and IFN-γ. Among these genes, the autophagy regulator Translocated Promoter Region, Nuclear Basket Protein (TPR) was significantly increased in T1R cells when compared with non-reactional MB cells. Overall, our results indicate that IFN-γ may induce a TPR-mediated autophagy transcriptional program in M. leprae-stimulated cells similar to that observed in skin cells during T1R by a pathway that involves IL-15 production, suggesting the involvement of this cytokine in the pathogenesis of T1R.


Assuntos
Autofagia/genética , Interleucina-15/genética , Hanseníase/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Células Cultivadas , Criança , Citocinas/genética , Feminino , Expressão Gênica/genética , Humanos , Interferon gama/genética , Hanseníase/microbiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mycobacterium leprae/patogenicidade , Pele/metabolismo , Pele/microbiologia , Células THP-1/metabolismo , Adulto Jovem
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 662307, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34354699

RESUMO

The treatment of multibacillary cases of leprosy with multidrug therapy (MDT) comprises 12 doses of a combination of rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine. Previous studies have described the immunological phenotypic pattern in skin lesions in multibacillary patients. Here, we evaluated the effect of MDT on skin cell phenotype and on the Mycobacterium leprae-specific immune response. An analysis of skin cell phenotype demonstrated a significant decrease in MRS1 (SR-A), CXCL10 (IP-10) and IFNG (IFN-γ) gene and protein expression after MDT release. Patients were randomized according to whether they experienced a reduction in bacillary load after MDT. A reduction in CXCL10 (IP-10) in sera was associated with the absence of a reduction in the bacillary load at release. Although IFN-γ production in response to M. leprae was not affected by MDT, CXCL10 (IP-10) levels in response to M. leprae increased in cells from patients who experienced a reduction in bacillary load after treatment. Together, our results suggest that CXCL10 (IP-10) may be a good marker for monitoring treatment efficacy in multibacillary patients.


Assuntos
Quimiocina CXCL10/sangue , Hansenostáticos/uso terapêutico , Hanseníase/tratamento farmacológico , Pele/imunologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Carga Bacteriana/efeitos dos fármacos , Biomarcadores/sangue , Quimiocina CXCL10/imunologia , Quimioterapia Combinada , Feminino , Humanos , Hansenostáticos/administração & dosagem , Hanseníase/imunologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mycobacterium leprae/imunologia , Pele/microbiologia , Pele/patologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
3.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(8): e0009654, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34424909

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Since ancient times leprosy has had a negative perception, resulting in stigmatization. To improve the lives of persons affected by leprosy, these negative perceptions need to change. The aim of this study is to evaluate interventions to change perceptions and improve knowledge of leprosy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a pre-post intervention study in Fatehpur and Chandauli districts, Uttar Pradesh, India. Based on six steps of quality intervention development (6SQuID) two interventions were designed: (1) posters that provided information about leprosy and challenged misconceptions, and (2) meetings with persons affected by leprosy, community members and influential people in the community. The effect of the interventions was evaluated in a mixed-methods design; in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, and questionnaires containing a knowledge measure (KAP), two perception measures (EMIC-CSS, SDS) and an intervention evaluation tool. 1067 participants were included in Survey 1 and 843 in Survey 2. The interventions were effective in increasing knowledge of all participant groups, and in changing community and personal attitudes of close contacts and community members (changes of 19%, 24% and 13% on the maximum KAP, EMIC-CSS and SDS scores respectively, p<0.05). In Survey 1, 13% of participants had adequate knowledge of leprosy versus 53% in Survey 2. Responses showed stigmatizing community attitudes in 86% (Survey 1) and 61% (Survey 2) of participants and negative personal attitudes in 37% (Survey 1) and 19% (Survey 2). The number of posters seen was associated with KAP, EMIC-CSS and SDS scores in Survey 2 (p<0.001). In addition, during eight post-intervention focus group discussions and 48 interviews many participants indicated that the perception of leprosy in the community had changed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Contextualized posters and community meetings were effective in changing the perception of leprosy and in increasing leprosy-related knowledge. We recommend studying the long-term effect of the interventions, also on behavior.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Hanseníase/epidemiologia , Hanseníase/psicologia , Percepção Social , Adulto , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Índia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Análise de Regressão , Estigma Social , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
4.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(8): e0009434, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34449765

RESUMO

Pyruvate kinase (PK), encoded by the PKLR gene, is a key player in glycolysis controlling the integrity of erythrocytes. Due to Plasmodium selection, mutations for PK deficiency, which leads to hemolytic anemia, are associated with resistance to malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and with susceptibility to intracellular pathogens in experimental models. In this case-control study, we enrolled 4,555 individuals and investigated whether PKLR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) putatively selected for malaria resistance are associated with susceptibility to leprosy across Brazil (Manaus-North; Salvador-Northeast; Rondonópolis-Midwest and Rio de Janeiro-Southeast) and with tuberculosis in Mozambique. Haplotype T/G/G (rs1052176/rs4971072/rs11264359) was associated with leprosy susceptibility in Rio de Janeiro (OR = 2.46, p = 0.00001) and Salvador (OR = 1.57, p = 0.04), and with tuberculosis in Mozambique (OR = 1.52, p = 0.07). This haplotype downregulates PKLR expression in nerve and skin, accordingly to GTEx, and might subtly modulate ferritin and haptoglobin levels in serum. Furthermore, we observed genetic signatures of positive selection in the HCN3 gene (xpEHH>2 -recent selection) in Europe but not in Africa, involving 6 SNPs which are PKLR/HCN3 eQTLs. However, this evidence was not corroborated by the other tests (FST, Tajima's D and iHS). Altogether, we provide evidence that a common PKLR locus in Africans contribute to mycobacterial susceptibility in African descent populations and also highlight, for first, PKLR as a susceptibility gene for leprosy and TB.


Assuntos
Malária/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Piruvato Quinase/genética , Adulto , Brasil , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Frequência do Gene , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Haplótipos , Humanos , Desequilíbrio de Ligação , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Moçambique , Piruvato Quinase/deficiência , Adulto Jovem
5.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(1): 31-36, 2021 07 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34232909

RESUMO

Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. China was once one of the countries with severe leprosy epidemics, but its incidence has remained low in recent years. Despite this, there has been no decrease in its incidence more recently, and it is still a public health problem which needs to be controlled. In this study, we analyzed the epidemiological characteristics and trends in the detection rate of new cases of leprosy in China between 2004 and 2016. There were 4,519 cases of leprosy in 28 provinces, municipalities, and autonomous regions between 2004 and 2016, and the total incidence was 0.02815 (per 100,000 individuals) and 21 deaths. The overall incidence of leprosy showed an inverted "V" distribution (i.e., an increase followed by a decrease). Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangdong, Guizhou, and Guangxi were the top five regions with the highest incidence rates, and they accounted for 68.7% of the total cases. There were more male patients than female patients, and peasants accounted for 71.7% of the leprosy cases. The patients with leprosy in China were mainly concentrated in the age-group 15-44 years, as this group accounted for 57.2% of the total cases. The purpose of this study is to explore the epidemiology of leprosy in China. This analysis will be useful for future monitoring of leprosy and establishment of public health measures in China, in keeping with the "Programme for the Elimination of Leprosy in China 2011-2020."


Assuntos
Hanseníase/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Pré-Escolar , China/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mycobacterium leprae/isolamento & purificação , Estudos Retrospectivos , Adulto Jovem
6.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(11): 1590-1597, 2021 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34237262

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Trials of BCG vaccination to prevent or reduce severity of COVID-19 are taking place in adults, some of whom have been previously vaccinated, but evidence of the beneficial, non-specific effects of BCG come largely from data on mortality in infants and young children, and from in-vitro and animal studies, after a first BCG vaccination. We assess all-cause mortality following a large BCG revaccination trial in Malawi. METHODS: The Karonga Prevention trial was a population-based, double-blind, randomised controlled in Karonga District, northern Malawi, that enrolled participants between January, 1986, and November, 1989. The trial compared BCG (Glaxo-strain) revaccination versus placebo to prevent tuberculosis and leprosy. 46 889 individuals aged 3 months to 75 years were randomly assigned to receive BCG revaccination (n=23 528) or placebo (n=23 361). Here we report mortality since vaccination as recorded during active follow-up in northern areas of the district in 1991-94, and in a demographic surveillance follow-up in the southern area in 2002-18. 7389 individuals who received BCG (n=3746) or placebo (n=3643) lived in the northern follow-up areas, and 5616 individuals who received BCG (n=2798) or placebo (n=2818) lived in the southern area. Year of death or leaving the area were recorded for those not found. We used survival analysis to estimate all-cause mortality. FINDINGS: Follow-up information was available for 3709 (99·0%) BCG recipients and 3612 (99·1%) placebo recipients in the northern areas, and 2449 (87·5%) BCG recipients and 2413 (85·6%) placebo recipients in the southern area. There was no difference in mortality between the BCG and placebo groups in either area, overall or by age group or sex. In the northern area, there were 129 deaths per 19 694 person-years at risk in the BCG group (6·6 deaths per 1000 person-years at risk [95% CI 5·5-7·8]) versus 133 deaths per 19 111 person-years at risk in the placebo group (7·0 deaths per 1000 person-years at risk [95% CI 5·9-8·2]; HR 0·94 [95% CI 0·74-1·20]; p=0·62). In the southern area, there were 241 deaths per 38 399 person-years at risk in the BCG group (6·3 deaths per 1000 person-years at risk [95% CI 5·5-7·1]) versus 230 deaths per 38 676 person-years at risk in the placebo group (5·9 deaths per 1000 person-years at risk [95% CI 5·2-6·8]; HR 1·06 [95% CI 0·88-1·27]; p=0·54). INTERPRETATION: We found little evidence of any beneficial effect of BCG revaccination on all-cause mortality. The high proportion of deaths attributable to non-infectious causes beyond infancy, and the long time interval since BCG for most deaths, might obscure any benefits. FUNDING: British Leprosy Relief Association (LEPRA); Wellcome Trust.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Imunização Secundária/estatística & dados numéricos , Mortalidade , Vacinação/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Vacina BCG/imunologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/imunologia , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Imunogenicidade da Vacina , Hanseníase/imunologia , Hanseníase/mortalidade , Hanseníase/prevenção & controle , Malaui/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mycobacterium leprae/imunologia , SARS-CoV-2/imunologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Tuberculose/imunologia , Tuberculose/mortalidade , Tuberculose/prevenção & controle , Vacinação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
7.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(6): e0009456, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34166403

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Ethiopia has over 3,200 new cases of leprosy diagnosed every year. Prevention remains a challenge as transmission pathways are poorly understood. Susceptibility and disease manifestations are highly dependent on individual host-immune response. Nutritional deficiencies, such as protein-energy malnutrition, have been linked to reduced cell-mediated immunity, which in the case of leprosy, could lead to a higher chance of active leprosy and thus an increased reservoir of transmissible infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Between June and August 2018, recently diagnosed patients with leprosy and individuals without known contact with cases were enrolled as controls in North Gondar regional health centers. Participants answered survey questions on biometric data, demographics, socioeconomic situation, and dietary habits. Descriptive statistics, univariate, and multivariate logisitic regression examined associations between undernutrition, specifically body mass index (BMI), middle upper arm circumference (MUAC), and leprosy. Eighty-one participants (40 cases of leprosy, 41 controls) were enrolled (75% male) with an average age of 38.6 years (SD 18.3). The majority of cases were multibacillary (MB) (90%). There was a high prevalence of undernutrition with 24 (29.6%) participants underweight (BMI <18.5) and 17 (21%) having a low MUAC. On multivariate analysis, underweight was significantly associated with leprosy (aOR = 9.25, 95% CI 2.77, 30.81). Also found to be associated with leprosy was cutting the size of meals/skipping meals (OR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.0, 8.32) or not having enough money for food (OR = 10, 95% CI 3.44 29.06). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest a strong association between leprosy and undernutrition, while also supporting the framework that food insecurity may lead to undernutrition that then could increase susceptibility to leprosy. In conclusion, this study highlights the need to study the interplay of undernutrition, food insecurity, and the manifestations of leprosy.


Assuntos
Insegurança Alimentar/economia , Hanseníase/epidemiologia , Hanseníase/etiologia , Desnutrição/complicações , Desnutrição/epidemiologia , Pobreza , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Etiópia/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem
8.
Hum Reprod ; 36(9): 2576-2586, 2021 08 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34166497

RESUMO

STUDY QUESTION: Is the rate of fatherhood among men diagnosed with cancer in childhood and early adulthood different from men without cancer, and, if so, have the differences changed over time? SUMMARY ANSWER: Men diagnosed with cancer have had significantly reduced rates of fatherhood compared with undiagnosed men; however, the rates of fatherhood among the cancer survivors have increased markedly over time. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The number of children and young adolescents who survive cancer has steadily increased over recent decades, with a current 5-year survival rate of approximately 80%. Consequently, life circumstances after cancer have gained increasing importance, including the desire among survivors to have children and a family. ARTs to aid reproduction among cancer survivors have been developed, and fertility preservation is increasingly a topic being discussed before undergoing cancer treatment. But the potential for fertility preservation differs dependent on age at diagnosis and type of cancer. Earlier studies have shown a decreased fertility rate among survivors of child and adolescent cancer compared to those diagnosed in early adulthood. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This study is a national, register-based cohort study. Men diagnosed with cancer in childhood and early adulthood (<30 years of age) were registered in the Danish Cancer Register in 1978-2016 (n = 9353). According to the time of diagnosis, each cancer-diagnosed man was randomly matched with 150 undiagnosed men from the background population within the same birth year. The men were followed until having their first child, death, migration or the end of the study (31 December 2017) in medical registers and socio-demographic population registers. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Fatherhood among the boys and young men diagnosed with cancer were compared with the age-matched comparison group in all statistical analyses. Cancer diagnoses were categorised as central nervous system (CNS) cancers, haematological cancers or solid cancers. Analyses were stratified by age at diagnosis (0-9, 10-19, 20-29 years) and time of diagnosis (1978-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2009, 2010-2016). Death was incorporated as a competing risk in all analyses. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The study population consisted of 9353 boys and young men diagnosed with cancer between 1978 and 2016 and 1 386 493 men in the age-matched comparison group. Those surviving CNS cancer as young men had the lowest hazard ratio (HR) of fatherhood compared with the age-matched comparison group (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.57-0.79), followed by survivors of haematological cancers (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.81-1.01), while the highest chance of fatherhood was among survivors of solid cancers (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.12-1.20) with a slightly increased HR compared with undiagnosed males. The HR of becoming a father increased over time. From the first decade to the last decade 30 years later, the HR of becoming a father increased for solid tumours (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.73-0.83 to HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.95-1.22), haematological cancers (HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.53-0.79 to HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.73-1.30) and CNS cancers (HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.34-0.57 to HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.49-1.95) compared to the age-matched comparison group. Also, when compared with the age-matched comparison group, men diagnosed with cancer when aged 20-29 years were more likely became fathers over the time of the study (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.74-0.86 to HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The study was based on register data, and information was not available about the men's fertility potential, whether they had a desire to have children and whether it was possible for them to find a partner. Information about fertility preservation, e.g. sperm freezing, could also have provided additional insights. Furthermore, information about diagnosis and ART treatment would have been beneficial. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Information and education of male patients diagnosed with cancer about fertility preservation options and their chances to create their own family is crucial. Reassuringly, time trends showed more men with a previous cancer diagnosis becoming fathers in recent years than in earlier years, reflecting that survival and fertility preservation have improved over time. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): R.S. received a PhD grant from the Rosa Ebba Hansen Foundation and from the Health Foundation (J.nr. 15-B-0095). The funding for the establishment of the DANAC II Cohort was obtained from the Rosa Ebba Hansen Foundation. The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: N/A.


Assuntos
Sobreviventes de Câncer , Neoplasias , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Homens , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
9.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251631, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33984058

RESUMO

The number of new cases of leprosy reported worldwide has remained essentially unchanged for the last decade despite continued global use of free multidrug therapy (MDT) provided to any diagnosed leprosy patient. In order to more effectively interrupt the chain of transmission, new strategies will be required to detect those with latent disease who contribute to furthering transmission. To improve the ability to diagnose leprosy earlier in asymptomatic infected individuals, we examined the combined use of two well-known biomarkers of M. leprae infection, namely the presence of M. leprae DNA by PCR from earlobe slit skin smears (SSS) and positive antibody titers to the M. leprae-specific antigen, Phenolic Glycolipid I (anti-PGL-I) from leprosy patients and household contacts living in seven hyperendemic cities in the northern state of Pará, Brazilian Amazon. Combining both tests increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy over either test alone. A total of 466 individuals were evaluated, including 87 newly diagnosed leprosy patients, 52 post-treated patients, 296 household contacts and 31 healthy endemic controls. The highest frequency of double positives (PGL-I+/RLEP+) were detected in the new case group (40/87, 46%) with lower numbers for treated (12/52, 23.1%), household contacts (46/296, 15.5%) and healthy endemic controls (0/31, 0%). The frequencies in these groups were reversed for double negatives (PGL-I-/RLEP-) for new cases (6/87, 6.9%), treated leprosy cases (15/52, 28.8%) and the highest in household contacts (108/296, 36.5%) and healthy endemic controls (24/31, 77.4%). The data strongly suggest that household contacts that are double positive have latent disease, are likely contributing to shedding and transmission of disease to their close contacts and are at the highest risk of progressing to clinical disease. Proposed strategies to reduce leprosy transmission in highly endemic areas may include chemoprophylactic treatment of this group of individuals to stop the spread of bacilli to eventually lower new case detection rates in these areas.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Antibacterianos/imunologia , Antígenos de Bactérias/imunologia , Glicolipídeos/imunologia , Infecção Latente/diagnóstico , Hanseníase/diagnóstico , Mycobacterium leprae/isolamento & purificação , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , DNA Bacteriano/análise , Feminino , Humanos , Infecção Latente/imunologia , Hanseníase/imunologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mycobacterium leprae/imunologia , Adulto Jovem
10.
Mycoses ; 64(11): 1442-1447, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33966290

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Recurrent and clinically unresponsive dermatophytosis is being increasingly observed in India. However, there is little information regarding the extent of the problem and the factors responsible for these difficult to treat superficial fungal infections. AIM: To identify factors contributing to difficult to treat recurrent superficial fungal infections. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective cross-sectional study enrolled 105 patients of all age groups presenting with either recurrent or long-standing dermatophyte infection attending the outpatient department of Dermatology, Venerology and Leprosy of Bharati Hospital, Pune, India, between September 2018 and March 2020. Patients were clinically examined, clinical history was taken and questions were asked regarding their current complaints and recorded in a proforma. Data were analysed using the SPSS software package. RESULTS: The males outnumbered females (74.3% vs 25.7%). A strong association was observed between the presence of past history and duration of disease (p = .007). The association of use of topical steroids or keratolytic agents with the duration of disease was statistically significant (p = .022). There was a statistically significant inverse association of duration of disease with dermatologist consultation (p < .001). The association between consultation with non-dermatologist and the duration of disease was statistically significant (p = .035). CONCLUSION: Hyperhidrosis, obesity, positive family history, tight clothing and chronic diseases may be considered important factors in acquiring dermatophytic infection. However, when it comes to difficult to treat tinea infections, irrational usage of topical steroids, treatment from non-dermatologists and a past history of tinea appear to be more critical causative factors. Treatment of dermatophytosis by dermatologists/ trained physicians and increasing general awareness of the public regarding the current situation about tinea in the country would help to alleviate the current crisis.


Assuntos
Dermatomicoses/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Índia/epidemiologia , Lactente , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Centros de Atenção Terciária , Adulto Jovem
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 647832, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33936067

RESUMO

Leprosy is a disease with a clinical spectrum of presentations that is also manifested in diverse histological features. At one pole, lepromatous lesions (L-pole) have phagocytic foamy macrophages heavily parasitized with freely multiplying intracellular Mycobacterium leprae. At the other pole, the presence of epithelioid giant cells and granulomatous formation in tuberculoid lesions (T-pole) lead to the control of M. leprae replication and the containment of its spread. The mechanism that triggers this polarization is unknown, but macrophages are central in this process. Over the past few years, leprosy has been studied using large scale techniques to shed light on the basic pathways that, upon infection, rewire the host cellular metabolism and gene expression. M. leprae is particularly peculiar as it invades Schwann cells in the nerves, reprogramming their gene expression leading to a stem-like cell phenotype. This modulatory behavior exerted by M. leprae is also observed in skin macrophages. Here, we used live M. leprae to infect (10:1 multiplicity of infection) monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) for 48 h and analyzed the whole gene expression profile using microarrays. In this model, we observe an intense upregulation of genes consistent with a cellular immune response, with enriched pathways including peptide and protein secretion, leukocyte activation, inflammation, and cellular divalent inorganic cation homeostasis. Among the most differentially expressed genes (DEGs) are CCL5/RANTES and CYP27B1, and several members of the metallothionein and metalloproteinase families. This is consistent with a proinflammatory state that would resemble macrophage rewiring toward granulomatous formation observed at the T-pole. Furthermore, a comparison with a dataset retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus of M. leprae-infected Schwann cells (MOI 100:1) showed that the patterns among the DEGs are highly distinct, as the Schwann cells under these conditions had a scavenging and phagocytic gene profile similar to M2-like macrophages, with enriched pathways rearrangements in the cytoskeleton, lipid and cholesterol metabolism and upregulated genes including MVK, MSMO1, and LACC1/FAMIN. In summary, macrophages may have a central role in defining the paradigmatic cellular (T-pole) vs. humoral (L-pole) responses and it is likely that the multiplicity of infection and genetic polymorphisms in key genes are gearing this polarization.


Assuntos
Imunidade Celular/genética , Hanseníase Virchowiana/genética , Hanseníase Virchowiana/imunologia , Macrófagos/imunologia , Macrófagos/virologia , Mycobacterium leprae/imunologia , Transcriptoma , Adulto , Doadores de Sangue , Polaridade Celular/genética , Células Cultivadas , Feminino , Voluntários Saudáveis , Humanos , Hanseníase Virchowiana/microbiologia , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Células de Schwann/imunologia , Células de Schwann/virologia , Adulto Jovem
12.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(5): e0009382, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33939710

RESUMO

The World Health Organization has raised concerns about the increasing number of Hansen disease (HD) relapses worldwide, especially in Brazil, India, and Indonesia that report the highest number of recurrent cases. Relapses are an indicator of MDT effectiveness and can reflect Mycobacterium leprae persistence or re-infection. Relapse is also a potential marker for the development or progression of disability. In this research, we studied a large cohort of persons affected by HD treated with full fixed-dose multibacillary (MB) multidrug therapy (MDT) followed for up to 20 years and observed that relapses are a rare event. We estimated the incidence density of relapse in a cohort of patients classified to receive MB regime (bacillary index (BI) > 0), diagnosed between September 1997 and June 2017, and treated with twelve-dose MB-MDT at a HD reference center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We obtained the data from the data management system of the clinic routine service. We linked the selected cases to the dataset of relapses of the national HD data to confirm possible relapse cases diagnosed elsewhere. We diagnosed ten cases of relapse in a cohort of 713 patients followed-up for a mean of 12.1 years. This resulted in an incidence rate of 1.16 relapse cases per 1000 person-year (95% CI = 0.5915-2.076). The accumulated risk was 0.025 in 20 years. The very low risk observed in this cohort of twelve-dose-treated MB patients reinforces the success of the current MDT scheme.


Assuntos
Hansenostáticos/uso terapêutico , Hanseníase Virchowiana/tratamento farmacológico , Hanseníase Virchowiana/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Clofazimina/uso terapêutico , Dapsona/uso terapêutico , Quimioterapia Combinada , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mycobacterium leprae/efeitos dos fármacos , Recidiva , Estudos Retrospectivos , Rifampina/uso terapêutico , Pele/microbiologia , Pele/patologia , Adulto Jovem
13.
Front Immunol ; 12: 661135, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34017337

RESUMO

HLA-B*13:01 allele has been identified as the genetic determinant of dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) among leprosy and non-leprosy patients in several studies. Dapsone hydroxylamine (DDS-NHOH), an active metabolite of dapsone, has been believed to be responsible for DHS. However, studies have not highlighted the importance of other genetic polymorphisms in dapsone-induced severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR). We investigated the association of HLA alleles and cytochrome P450 (CYP) alleles with dapsone-induced SCAR in Thai non-leprosy patients. A prospective cohort study, 16 Thai patients of dapsone-induced SCARs (5 SJS-TEN and 11 DRESS) and 9 Taiwanese patients of dapsone-induced SCARs (2 SJS-TEN and 7 DRESS), 40 dapsone-tolerant controls, and 470 general Thai population were enrolled. HLA class I and II alleles were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotides (PCR-SSOs). CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 genotypes were determined by the TaqMan real-time PCR assay. We performed computational analyses of dapsone and DDS-NHOH interacting with HLA-B*13:01 and HLA-B*13:02 alleles by the molecular docking approach. Among all the HLA alleles, only HLA-B*13:01 allele was found to be significantly associated with dapsone-induced SCARs (OR = 39.00, 95% CI = 7.67-198.21, p = 5.3447 × 10-7), SJS-TEN (OR = 36.00, 95% CI = 3.19-405.89, p = 2.1657 × 10-3), and DRESS (OR = 40.50, 95% CI = 6.38-257.03, p = 1.0784 × 10-5) as compared to dapsone-tolerant controls. Also, HLA-B*13:01 allele was strongly associated with dapsone-induced SCARs in Asians (OR = 36.00, 95% CI = 8.67-149.52, p = 2.8068 × 10-7) and Taiwanese (OR = 31.50, 95% CI = 4.80-206.56, p = 2.5519 × 10-3). Furthermore, dapsone and DDS-NHOH fit within the extra-deep sub pocket of the antigen-binding site of the HLA-B*13:01 allele and change the antigen-recognition site. However, there was no significant association between genetic polymorphism of cytochrome P450 (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4) and dapsone-induced SCARs (SJS-TEN and DRESS). The results of this study support the specific genotyping of the HLA-B*13:01 allele to avoid dapsone-induced SCARs including SJS-TEN and DRESS before initiating dapsone therapy in the Asian population.


Assuntos
Alelos , Dapsona/efeitos adversos , Antígenos HLA-B/genética , Polimorfismo Genético , Pele/efeitos dos fármacos , Pele/patologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/estatística & dados numéricos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Sistema Enzimático do Citocromo P-450/genética , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Marcadores Genéticos , Genótipo , Antígenos HLA-B/classificação , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Simulação de Acoplamento Molecular , Estudos Prospectivos , Adulto Jovem
14.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol ; 87(3): 341-347, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33943064

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Lichen planus pigmentosus can have a negative impact on the quality of life; however, this has not been studied in detail. OBJECTIVES: To study the quality of life in patients with lichen planus pigmentosus and compare it with patients with vitiligo and melasma. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary-care center in north India from January 2018 to May 2019. Patients ≥ 18 years of age with lichen planus pigmentosus (n = 125), vitiligo (n = 113) and melasma (n = 121) completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire and answered a global question on the effect of disease on their lives. In addition, patients with vitiligo completed the Vitiligo Impact Scale (VIS)-22 questionnaire, while those with lichen planus pigmentosus and melasma filled a modified version of VIS-22. RESULTS: The mean DLQI scores in patients with lichen planus pigmentosus, vitiligo and melasma were 10.9 ± 5.95, 9.73 ± 6.51 and 8.39 ± 5.92, respectively, the difference being statistically significant only between lichen planus pigmentosus and melasma (P < 0.001). The corresponding mean modified VIS-22/VIS-22 scores were 26.82 ± 11.89, 25.82 ± 14.03 and 18.87 ± 11.84, respectively. This difference was statistically significant between lichen planus pigmentosus and melasma, and between vitiligo and melasma (P < 0.001 for both). As compared to vitiligo, patients with lichen planus pigmentosus had a significantly greater impact on "symptoms and feelings" domain (P < 0.001) on DLQI, and on "social interactions" (P = 0.02) and "depression" (P = 0.04) domains on VIS-22. As compared to melasma, patients with lichen planus pigmentosus had significantly higher scores for "symptoms and feelings," "daily activities," "leisure" and "work and school" domains of DLQI, and all domains of VIS-22. Female gender was more associated with impairment in quality of life in patients with lichen planus pigmentosus, while lower education, marriage, younger age and increasing disease duration showed a directional trend. LIMITATIONS: Use of DLQI and modified version of VIS-22 scales in the absence of a pigmentary disease-specific quality-of-life instrument. CONCLUSION: Patients with lichen planus pigmentosus have a significantly impaired quality of life. The psychosocial burden of lichen planus pigmentosus is quantitatively similar to that of vitiligo, but significantly greater than melasma.


Assuntos
Líquen Plano/psicologia , Melanose/psicologia , Transtornos da Pigmentação/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida , Vitiligo/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Escolaridade , Feminino , Humanos , Índia , Líquen Plano/complicações , Masculino , Estado Civil , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Transtornos da Pigmentação/etiologia , Fatores Sexuais , Centros de Atenção Terciária , Adulto Jovem
15.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 71(3): 838-842, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34057932

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the occurrence and characteristics of the two types of lepra reactions in new leprosy cases at initial diagnosis. Methods: The retrospective descriptive study was conducted at the Marie Adelaide Leprosy Centre, Karachi, and comprised all new leprosy cases registered from January 1, 2016, to June 30, 2018. Data was collected from the medical record database using a predesigned proforma. RESULTS: Of the 50 cases, 2(4%) were children and 48 (96%) were adults, with overall age ranging from 12 to 85 years. There were 41(82%) males and 9(18%) females.. Of the total, 30(60%) cases presented with type 1 reaction and 20(40%) with type 2. Further, 30(60%) cases were classified as borderline lepromatous. Among them, 17(57%) had type 2 reaction. Inflamed plaques were the main feature in 27(90%) cases of type 1. Crops of painful, erythematous nodules were seen in 19(95%) cases of type 2. Conclusion: Lepra reactions were found to be a presenting feature in a significant number of new leprosy cases at initial diagnosis.


Assuntos
Hanseníase , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Humanos , Hanseníase/diagnóstico , Hanseníase/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Paquistão/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Adulto Jovem
16.
Am J Case Rep ; 22: e931655, 2021 May 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34038399

RESUMO

BACKGROUND Leprosy is an infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae. An extensive literature search did not reveal many reports of melioidosis in association with leprosy. CASE REPORT A 22-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with multibacillary leprosy, developed dapsone-induced methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia, complicated by melioidosis. Methemoglobinemia was treated with methylene blue and vitamin C. Two weeks of ceftazidime was initiated to treat melioidosis, and the patient was discharged on amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and doxycycline as melioidosis eradication therapy. However, she developed drug-induced hypersensitivity. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, as an alternative treatment for melioidosis eradication, was commenced and was successfully completed for 12 weeks. During the fifth month of multidrug therapy, the patient developed type II lepra reaction with erythema nodosum leprosum reaction, which was treated with prednisolone. Leprosy treatment continued with clofazimine and ofloxacin, and complete resolution of skin lesions occurred after 12 months of therapy. CONCLUSIONS Our case highlighted the challenges posed in managing a patient with multibacillary leprosy with multiple complications. Clinicians should be aware that dapsone-induced methemoglobinemia and hemolysis might complicate the treatment of leprosy. Our case also highlighted the safety and efficacy of combining ofloxacin and clofazimine as a leprosy treatment regimen in addition to gradual steroid dose titration in the presence of type II lepra reaction.


Assuntos
Anemia Hemolítica , Hanseníase Virchowiana , Melioidose , Metemoglobinemia , Adulto , Anemia Hemolítica/induzido quimicamente , Anemia Hemolítica/tratamento farmacológico , Dapsona/efeitos adversos , Quimioterapia Combinada , Feminino , Humanos , Hansenostáticos/efeitos adversos , Hanseníase Virchowiana/complicações , Hanseníase Virchowiana/tratamento farmacológico , Metemoglobinemia/induzido quimicamente , Metemoglobinemia/tratamento farmacológico , Adulto Jovem
17.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(4): e0009329, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33798199

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Leprosy and leprosy-related stigma can have a major impact on psychosocial wellbeing of persons affected and their family members. Resilience is a process that incorporates many of the core skills and abilities which may enable people to address stigma and discrimination. The current study aimed to develop and pilot an intervention to strengthen individual and family resilience against leprosy-related discrimination. METHODOLOGY: We used a quasi-experimental, before-after study design with a mixed methods approach. The 10-week family-based intervention was designed to strengthen the resilience of individuals and families by enhancing their protective abilities and capacity to overcome adversity. The study was conducted in two sites, urban areas in Telangana state, and in rural areas in Odisha state, India. Persons affected and their family members were included using purposive sampling. Two questionnaires were used pre-and post-intervention: the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC, maximum score 100, with high scores reflecting greater resilience) and the WHOQOL-BREF (maximum score of 130, with higher scores reflecting higher quality of life). In addition, semi-structured interviews were conducted post-intervention. Data were collected at baseline, a few weeks after completion of the intervention, and in the Odisha cohort again at six months after completion. Paired t-tests measured differences pre- and post- intervention. Qualitative data were thematically analysed. FINDINGS: Eighty participants across 20 families were included in the study (23 persons affected and 57 family members). We found a significant increase in CD-RISC scores for persons affected and family members from Odisha state (baseline 46.5, first follow-up 77.0, second follow-up 70.0), this improvement was maintained at six-month follow-up. There was no increase in CD-RISC scores post-intervention among participants from Telangana state. WHOQOL-BREF scores were significantly higher at follow-up for persons affected in both states, and for family members in Odisha state. No families dropped out of the study. In the qualitative feedback, all participants described drawing benefit from the programme. Participants especially appreciated the social dimensions of the intervention. CONCLUSION: This pilot study showed that the 10-week family-based intervention to strengthen resilience among persons affected by leprosy and their family members was feasible, and has the potential to improve resilience and quality of life. A large-scale efficacy trial is necessary to determine the effectiveness and long-term sustainability of the intervention.


Assuntos
Saúde da Família , Família/psicologia , Hanseníase/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Resiliência Psicológica , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Índia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Projetos Piloto , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Estigma Social , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
18.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol ; 87(3): 357-363, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33871214

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Carotid intima-media thickness test is a surrogate marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Epicardial fat thickness is an early marker of coronary artery disease. Several studies have noted that psoriasis patients have an increased risk of coronary artery disease. In the present study, we attempted to see any variation in carotid intima-media thickness and epicardial fat thickness in psoriasis patients when compared to controls. AIMS: 1) To determine the carotid intima-media thickness and epicardial fat thickness in psoriatic patients and healthy controls. 2) To evaluate the association between carotid intima-media thickness and epicardial fat thickness in psoriasis patients. METHODS: A hospital-based study with 100 subjects (50 with psoriasis and 50 healthy controls) was conducted in the Dermatology Outpatient Department of Justice KS Hegde Charitable Hospital, a unit of KS Hegde Medical Academy affiliated to NITTE (Deemed to be University) Mangaluru. A detailed history and examination including body mass index, psoriasis area and severity index were done. Carotid ultrasound was done to measure carotid intima-media thickness and transthoracic echocardiography was done to assess epicardial fat thickness in both cases and controls. Independent sample t-test, Pearson rank correlation (r) coefficient were used for statistical analysis. P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22 Armonk, NY: IBM Corp was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Mean carotid intima-media thickness in the right carotid ([0.51 ± 0.1mm vs 0.47 ± 0.1 mm] [P = 0.038]) and left carotid ([0.53 ± 0.12 mm vs 0.48 ± 0.1 mm] [P = 0.041]) were significantly increased in psoriasis patients than in controls. Mean epicardial fat thickness was significantly increased ([1.76 ± 0.66 mm vs. 1.49 ± 0.47 mm] ([P = 0.020]) in patients with psoriasis when compared with the controls. Epicardial fat thickness was positively correlated with carotid intima-media thickness in patients with psoriasis. LIMITATIONS: The cross-sectional design of the study, smoking among study subjects, inter and intraobserver variability of measurement of epicardial fat thickness and carotid intima-media thickness. CONCLUSION: Carotid intima-media thickness and epicardial fat thickness were increased in psoriasis patients when compared with healthy controls. Epicardial fat thickness was positively correlated with carotid intima-media thickness in cases.


Assuntos
Tecido Adiposo/diagnóstico por imagem , Espessura Intima-Media Carotídea , Pericárdio/diagnóstico por imagem , Psoríase/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Pressão Sanguínea , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Doença da Artéria Coronariana/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Ecocardiografia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Síndrome Metabólica/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 647385, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33777045

RESUMO

Leprosy is an infectious disease that remains endemic in approximately 100 developing countries, where about 200,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. Moreover, multibacillary leprosy, the most contagious form of the disease, has been detected at continuously higher rates among Brazilian elderly people. Due to the so-called immunosenescence, characterized by several alterations in the quality of the immune response during aging, this group is more susceptible to infectious diseases. In view of such data, the purpose of our work was to investigate if age-related alterations in the immune response could influence the pathogenesis of leprosy. As such, we studied 87 individuals, 62 newly diagnosed and untreated leprosy patients distributed according to the age range and to the clinical forms of the disease and 25 healthy volunteers, who were studied as controls. The frequency of senescent and memory CD8+ leukocytes was assessed by immunofluorescence of biopsies from cutaneous lesions, while the serum levels of IgG anti-CMV antibodies were analyzed by chemiluminescence and the gene expression of T cell receptors' inhibitors by RT-qPCR. We noted an accumulation of memory CD8+ T lymphocytes, as well as reduced CD8+CD28+ cell expression in skin lesions from elderly patients, when compared to younger people. Alterations in LAG3 and PDCD1 gene expression in cutaneous lesions of young MB patients were also observed, when compared to elderly patients. Such data suggest that the age-related alterations of T lymphocyte subsets can facilitate the onset of leprosy in elderly patients, not to mention other chronic inflammatory diseases.


Assuntos
Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/imunologia , Senescência Celular/imunologia , Memória Imunológica , Imunossenescência/imunologia , Hanseníase/imunologia , Mycobacterium leprae , Dermatopatias/imunologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Anticorpos Antivirais/sangue , Antígenos CD/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Citomegalovirus/imunologia , Feminino , Expressão Gênica , Humanos , Imunoglobulina G/sangue , Hanseníase/sangue , Hanseníase/microbiologia , Hanseníase/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Receptor de Morte Celular Programada 1/genética , Pele/imunologia , Pele/patologia , Dermatopatias/sangue , Dermatopatias/microbiologia , Dermatopatias/patologia , Adulto Jovem
20.
J Manag Care Spec Pharm ; 27(4): 455-468, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33769850

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Oral semaglutide is the first oral formulation of a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist to be approved in the United States for glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). While oral semaglutide is not indicated for reduction of cardiovascular event risk, its label does include evidence of no increase in cardiovascular risk in people who received oral semaglutide. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incremental value of oral semaglutide added to existing antihyperglycemic treatment for people with T2DM with additional risk for cardiovascular disease. METHODS: We estimated the lifetime cost-effectiveness of oral semaglutide added to current antihyperglycemic treatment for T2DM using a microsimulation model based primarily on the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Outcomes Model 2 (OM2) equations. Oral semaglutide added to current antihyperglycemic treatment was separately compared with (a) ongoing background antihyperglycemic treatment, (b) sitagliptin, (c) empagliflozin, and (d) liraglutide. Comparators sitagliptin, empagliflozin, and liraglutide were added to ongoing antihyperglycemic treatment. We applied hazard ratios derived from a network meta-analysis for cardiovascular and renal outcomes to the UKPDS OM2 estimated baseline rates. Health state utilities and costs were derived from the published literature. We estimated total costs, life-years (LYs), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), clinical events, and cost per major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) avoided, over a lifetime time horizon using discount rates of 3% for costs and outcomes. RESULTS: The lifetime total cost for people treated with oral semaglutide was $311,300, with costs for the other comparators ranging from $262,800 (background treatment alone) to $287,800 (liraglutide). Oral semaglutide resulted in the fewest MACE, including the fewest cardiovascular deaths. Among the 5 modeled treatment strategies, oral semaglutide had the highest LYs gained (8.43 vs. 7.76 [background treatment alone] to 8.29 [empagliflozin and liraglutide]) and the highest QALYs gained (4.11 vs. 3.70 [background treatment alone] to 4.03 [empagliflozin]). Oral semaglutide would likely be considered cost-effective compared with liraglutide (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER] = $40,100), and moderately cost-effective versus background treatment alone ([ICER] = $117,500/QALY) and sitagliptin (ICER = $145,200/QALY). The ICER for oral semaglutide compared with empagliflozin was approximately $458,400 per QALY. CONCLUSIONS: As modeled, oral semaglutide as an add-on therapy to background antihyperglycemic treatment produced incremental benefits in MACE avoided, along with greater QALYs compared with background antihyperglycemic treatment alone. Oral semaglutide use resulted in better outcomes than background treatment alone or sitagliptin, and similar outcomes to liraglutide or empagliflozin with overlapping 95% confidence ranges for QALYs. Oral semaglutide was estimated to be cost-effective compared with liraglutide and to have incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between $100,000 and $150,000 per QALY versus sitagliptin and background therapy alone, but it did not meet these thresholds compared with empagliflozin. DISCLOSURES: Funding for this study was provided by the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, an independent organization that evaluates the evidence on the value of health care interventions. ICER reports grants from Laura and John Arnold Foundation, California Health Care Foundation, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, and Kaiser Foundation Health Plan. ICER's annual policy summit is supported by dues from AbbVie, Aetna, America's Health Insurance Plans, Anthem, Alnylam, AstraZeneca, Biogen, Blue Shield of CA, Cambia Health Services, CVS, Editas, Evolve Pharmacy, Express Scripts, Genentech/Roche, GlaxoSmithKline, Harvard Pilgrim, Health Care Service Corporation, Health Partners, Humana, Johnson & Johnson (Janssen), Kaiser Permanente, LEO Pharma, Mallinckrodt, Merck, Novartis, National Pharmaceutical Council, Premera, Prime Therapeutics, Regeneron, Sanofi, Spark Therapeutics, uniQure, and United Healthcare. Rind, Fazioli, Chapman, and Pearson are employed by ICER. Guzauskas and Hansen have nothing to disclose. Study results were presented at the New England Comparative Effectiveness Public Advisory Council (New England CEPAC), November 14, 2019, at Brown University, Providence, RI.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/tratamento farmacológico , Peptídeos Semelhantes ao Glucagon/uso terapêutico , Hipoglicemiantes/uso terapêutico , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Análise Custo-Benefício , Quimioterapia Combinada , Feminino , Peptídeos Semelhantes ao Glucagon/administração & dosagem , Peptídeos Semelhantes ao Glucagon/economia , Humanos , Hipoglicemiantes/administração & dosagem , Hipoglicemiantes/economia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos Econômicos , Anos de Vida Ajustados por Qualidade de Vida , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
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