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1.
JMIR Cancer ; 8(2): e31815, 2022 Apr 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35486425

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Survivors of breast cancer can face internal barriers to physical activity, such as uncertainty and frustration stemming from physical limitations, decreased physical functioning, fatigue, and pain. Interventions that draw from the principles of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may help survivors of breast cancer overcome some of the internal barriers associated with physical activity. OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the acceptability of an electronically delivered physical activity intervention for survivors of breast cancer, centered on ACT processes. METHODS: This study used a 1-group pretest-posttest design. We recruited 80 insufficiently active female survivors of breast cancer using a web-based recruitment strategy. The 8-week intervention consisted of weekly modules that featured didactic lessons and experiential exercises targeting key ACT processes in the context of physical activity promotion (namely, values, committed action, acceptance, defusion, and contacting the present moment). We determined intervention acceptability according to study retention (≥70%), adherence rates (≥75% of the participants completing ≥50% of the modules), and posttest survey scores reflecting the perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and interest and enjoyment of the intervention (≥5 on a 7-point Likert-type scale). We also evaluated changes in self-reported aerobic and muscle strengthening-physical activity, physical activity acceptance, physical activity regulation, and health-related outcomes. RESULTS: The retention rate (61/80, 76%), adherence rate (60/80, 75%), average perceived ease of use (6.17, SD 1.17), perceived usefulness (5.59, SD 1.40), and interest and enjoyment scores (5.43, SD 1.40) met the acceptability criteria. Participants increased their self-reported aerobic physical activity (Cohen d=1.04), muscle strengthening-physical activity (Cohen d=1.02), physical activity acceptance (cognitive acceptance: Cohen d=0.35; behavioral commitment: Cohen d=0.51), physical activity regulation (identified regulation: Cohen d=0.37; integrated regulation: Cohen d=0.66), increased their ability to participate in social roles and activities (Cohen d=0.18), and reported less fatigue (Cohen d=0.33) and sleep disturbance (Cohen d=0.53). CONCLUSIONS: Electronically delivered acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions may be useful for promoting physical activity in survivors of breast cancer. Further research is needed to refine these approaches and evaluate their effectiveness.

2.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(1): 465-473, 2022 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34313858

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize the relevance and potential utility of an electronically delivered acceptance- and mindfulness-based approaches to physical activity promotion for insufficiently active breast cancer survivors. METHODS: The acceptance- and mindfulness-based physical activity intervention was delivered to participants electronically over the course of 4-8 weeks. It consisted of didactic videos, experiential exercises, and workbook-type activities that targeted principles from acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with participants after they completed the intervention. Three coders conducted qualitative data analysis on interview transcripts to identify overarching themes and subthemes. RESULTS: We recruited 30 participants. Of those, 16 engaged in an individual interview. The mean age of the sample was 58.4 years (SD = 13.8). The sample was relatively well educated (50.0% college graduates) and mostly overweight or obese (58.8%). We identified two overarching themes from interviews. They were centered on (1) internal and external barriers to physical activity adherence and (2) the utility of targeting core ACT processes (acceptance and defusion, mindfulness, and values clarification) for physical activity promotion. CONCLUSION: Intervention content was perceived to be acceptable, relevant, and to fulfill important needs related to healthy living. Findings suggest that this approach to physical activity promotion can be delivered effectively online. Electronically delivered acceptance- and mindfulness-based approaches hold promise for helping insufficiently active breast cancer survivors increase physical activity.


Asunto(s)
Terapia de Aceptación y Compromiso , Neoplasias de la Mama , Supervivientes de Cáncer , Atención Plena , Ejercicio Físico , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad
3.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 20: 1534735420986615, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33870744

RESUMEN

Loss of skeletal muscle and inferior muscle quality are associated with poor prognosis in patients undergoing preoperative treatment for pancreatic cancer, so maintaining skeletal muscle health before surgery may help accelerate patients' functional recovery and improve their quality of life following surgery. While exercise helps maintain or increase skeletal muscle in individuals undergoing cancer treatment, its efficacy during pancreatic cancer treatment is unclear. Accordingly, in this study we compared changes in skeletal muscle quantity (skeletal muscle index [SMI]) and quality (skeletal muscle density [SMD]) during preoperative pancreatic cancer treatment in participants in a home-based exercise program (EP) and a historical cohort of patients who received the usual care (UC) with no formal exercise programming. Recommendations for the EP cohort included both aerobic and resistance exercise. We assessed changes in SMI and SMD using computed tomography scans administered at treatment planning (T0, prior to EP enrollment) and preoperative restaging (T1) for 33 EP and 64 UC patients and compared changes between groups. The UC patients had statistically significant SMI decreases from T0 to T1 (-1.4 ± 3.8 cm2/m2; p = .005), while the EP patients did not (0.2 ± 3.2 cm2/m2; p = .7). The SMI loss was significantly worse for the UC than for the EP patients (p = .03). Neither group demonstrated statistically significant changes in SMD from T0 to T1, nor did the groups differ in the amount of change in SMD. An adjusted linear regression model demonstrated that EP participation was significantly associated with better SMI maintenance (p = .02). These results suggest that participation in a home-based EP during preoperative treatment may help improve skeletal muscle health and clinical and quality of life outcomes for pancreatic cancer survivors.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias Pancreáticas , Calidad de Vida , Ejercicio Físico , Humanos , Músculo Esquelético , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/terapia
4.
Support Care Cancer ; 28(12): 5821-5832, 2020 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32249355

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Weight gain is common among breast cancer patients and may contribute to poorer treatment outcomes. Most programs target breast cancer survivors after the completion of therapy and focus on weight reduction. This study examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an intervention designed to prevent primary weight gain among women receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. METHODS: Thirty-eight newly diagnosed stage II or III breast cancer patients were randomized to the BALANCE intervention or usual care within 3 weeks of starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The intervention used a size acceptance-based approach and encouraged home-based resistance and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise as well as a low energy-dense diet to prevent weight gain. Assessments were conducted at baseline, mid-chemotherapy (3 months), and post-chemotherapy (6 months). Intervention feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects on anthropometric, quality of life, and circulating biomarker measures were evaluated. RESULTS: Intervention participant retention (100%) and in-person session attendance (80%) were high during the intervention period, although attendance dropped to 43% for telephone-delivered sessions. The majority of participants reported being satisfied with the intervention during chemotherapy (88%). Participants in the intervention group had greater reductions in waist circumference (p = .03) and greater improvements in self-reported vitality scores (p = .03) than the control group at the end of chemotherapy. Significant effects on biomarkers were not observed. CONCLUSIONS: A size acceptance weight management program is feasible during neoadjuvant chemotherapy among breast cancer patients and may have beneficial effects on waist circumference and patient vitality. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study was registered as a clinical trial at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00533338).


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama/tratamiento farmacológico , Terapia Neoadyuvante/métodos , Aumento de Peso/fisiología , Pérdida de Peso/fisiología , Programas de Reducción de Peso/métodos , Ejercicio Físico , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estadificación de Neoplasias , Terapia Nutricional , Proyectos Piloto , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Proyectos de Investigación , Teléfono
5.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 18: 1534735419894061, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31858837

RESUMEN

Purpose: To investigate relationships among physical activity, changes in physical function, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma enrolled in a home-based exercise prehabilitation program. Methods: Patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma receiving preoperative chemotherapy and/or chemoradiation were enrolled on this prospective, single-arm trial and were advised to perform ≥60 minutes each of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and strengthening exercise weekly. Activity was measured via self-report and accelerometers, including moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light physical activity (LPA), and sedentary activity (SA). Physical function measures at baseline and restaging follow-up included 6-minute walk test (6MWT), 5 times sit-to-stand (5×STS), handgrip strength (HGS), 3-m walk for gait speed (GS), and the PROMIS Physical Function Short Form. HRQOL was measured via the FACT-Hep questionnaire. Results: Fifty participants with mean age 66 years (standard deviation = 8 years) were enrolled. The 6MWT, 5×STS, and GS significantly improved from baseline to restaging follow-up (P=.001, P=.049, and P=.009, respectively). Increases in self-reported aerobic exercise, weekly MVPA, and LPA were associated with improvement in 6MWT (ß=.19, P=.048; ß=.18, P=.03; and ß=.08, P=.03, respectively) and self-reported physical functioning (ß=.02, P=.03; ß=.03, P=.005; and ß=.01, P=.02, respectively). Increased weekly LPA was associated with increased HRQOL (ß=.03, P=.02). Increased SA was associated with decreased HRQOL (ß=-.02,P=.01). Conclusions: Patients with potentially resectable pancreatic cancer exhibit meaningful improvement in physical function with prehabilitation; physical activity was associated with improved physical function and HRQOL. These data highlight the importance of physical activity during treatment for pancreatic cancer.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico/fisiología , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/fisiopatología , Recuperación de la Función/fisiología , Adenocarcinoma/fisiopatología , Anciano , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Femenino , Fuerza de la Mano/fisiología , Humanos , Masculino , Estudios Prospectivos , Calidad de Vida , Autoinforme , Caminata/fisiología , Neoplasias Pancreáticas
6.
PLoS One ; 14(8): e0220814, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31369653

RESUMEN

Physical activity (PA) is a known behavior to reduce cancer risk and improve cancer survivorship, yet adherence to PA guidelines is poor among the general population and cancer survivors. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which patients referred for exercise consultation within a clinical cancer prevention setting were meeting aerobic and resistance physical activity (PA) guidelines and to identify factors associated with guideline adherence. Between 2013 and 2015, cancer prevention patients and cancer survivors were interviewed by an exercise physiologist within an Integrative Health Program at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Prevention Center. PA adherence was defined as at least 150-minutes of moderate-intensity or 75-minutes of vigorous-intensity PA per week, along with resistance training at least 2 days per week. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with meeting or not meeting PA guidelines for aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, and aerobic and resistance exercise combined. Among 1,024 cancer prevention patients and survivors, 9% of patients adhered to guideline-based PA. Adherence to aerobic and resistance guidelines were 20% and 12%, respectively. Overweight or obesity was associated with not meeting guideline-based PA in both cancer prevention patients and cancer survivors. Among breast cancer survivors, combination treatment with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy ('multimodal therapy') was robustly associated with not meeting aerobic guidelines (OR 2.20, 95% CI: 1.17 to 4.16). BMI and breast cancer treatment history are key determinants of PA behavior among cancer prevention patients and survivors. Poor adherence to PA guidelines is a key issue for cancer prevention patients and survivors, particularly obese patients and women who receive multimodal therapy for breast cancer. Identifying and connecting patients at highest risk of poor PA adherence with exercise programs is needed to improve PA, a key modifiable cancer risk factor.


Asunto(s)
Supervivientes de Cáncer/psicología , Ejercicio Físico , Neoplasias/prevención & control , Cooperación del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Entrenamiento de Fuerza , Adulto , Anciano , Neoplasias de la Mama/prevención & control , Neoplasias de la Mama/psicología , Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias/psicología , Cooperación del Paciente/psicología , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Entrenamiento de Fuerza/estadística & datos numéricos
7.
Fam Cancer ; 18(4): 399-420, 2019 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31236808

RESUMEN

Lifestyle factors related to energy balance, such as excess body weight, poor diet, and physical inactivity, are associated with risk of sporadic endometrial cancer (EC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). There are limited data on energy balance-related lifestyle factors and EC or CRC risk among individuals with lynch syndrome, who are at extraordinarily higher risk of developing EC or CRC. We conducted a systematic review of evidence related to weight status, weight change, dietary habits, and physical activity on EC and CRC risk among individuals with lynch syndrome. Findings are reported narratively. We searched Medline, EMBASE, CENTRAL, PubMed, and clinicaltrials.gov up to June 14th, 2018. In total, 1060 studies were identified and 16 were included. Three studies were related to EC and 13 to CRC. Overall, evidence suggests that weight status/weight change may not be associated with EC risk and multivitamin and folic-acid supplementation may be associated with decreased EC risk. Early-adulthood overweight/obese weight-status and adulthood weight-gain may be associated with increased CRC risk, whereas multivitamin supplementation, tea and high fruit intake, and physical activity may be associated with decreased CRC risk. Current evidence proposes that recommendations related to weight, some dietary habits, and physical activity recommended for the general public are also relevant to individuals with lynch syndrome. More research is needed, specifically prospective cohorts and randomized controlled trials, to determine if tailored recommendations are needed among individuals with lynch syndrome.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias Colorrectales Hereditarias sin Poliposis/complicaciones , Neoplasias Colorrectales/etiología , Neoplasias Endometriales/etiología , Ingestión de Energía , Estilo de Vida , Peso Corporal , Neoplasias Endometriales/prevención & control , Metabolismo Energético , Ejercicio Físico , Conducta Alimentaria , Femenino , Ácido Fólico/farmacología , Humanos , Masculino , Vitaminas/farmacología
8.
Cancer ; 124(1): 36-45, 2018 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28940301

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The current randomized trial examined the effects of a Tibetan yoga program (TYP) versus a stretching program (STP) and usual care (UC) on sleep and fatigue in women with breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy. METHODS: Women with stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM) I to III breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy were randomized to TYP (74 women), STP (68 women), or UC (85 women). Participants in the TYP and STP groups participated in 4 sessions during chemotherapy, followed by 3 booster sessions over the subsequent 6 months, and were encouraged to practice at home. Self-report measures of sleep disturbances (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Brief Fatigue Inventory), and actigraphy were collected at baseline; 1 week after treatment; and at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: There were no group differences noted in total sleep disturbances or fatigue levels over time. However, patients in the TYP group reported fewer daily disturbances 1 week after treatment compared with those in the STP (difference, -0.43; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], -0.82 to -0.04 [P = .03]) and UC (difference, -0.41; 95% CI, -0.77 to -0.05 [P = .02]) groups. Group differences at the other time points were maintained for TYP versus STP. Actigraphy data revealed greater minutes awake after sleep onset for patients in the STP group 1 week after treatment versus those in the TYP (difference, 15.36; 95% CI, 7.25-23.48 [P = .0003]) and UC (difference, 14.48; 95% CI, 7.09-21.87 [P = .0002]) groups. Patients in the TYP group who practiced at least 2 times a week during follow-up reported better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and actigraphy outcomes at 3 months and 6 months after treatment compared with those who did not and better outcomes compared with those in the UC group. CONCLUSIONS: Participating in TYP during chemotherapy resulted in modest short-term benefits in sleep quality, with long-term benefits emerging over time for those who practiced TYP at least 2 times a week. Cancer 2018;124:36-45. © 2017 American Cancer Society.


Asunto(s)
Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/efectos adversos , Neoplasias de la Mama/rehabilitación , Fatiga/rehabilitación , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/rehabilitación , Yoga , Actigrafía , Adulto , Antineoplásicos/efectos adversos , Antineoplásicos/uso terapéutico , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/uso terapéutico , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Neoplasias de la Mama/tratamiento farmacológico , Neoplasias de la Mama/patología , Quimioterapia Adyuvante , Ciclofosfamida/administración & dosificación , Docetaxel , Doxorrubicina/administración & dosificación , Epirrubicina/administración & dosificación , Fatiga/inducido químicamente , Fatiga/etiología , Femenino , Fluorouracilo/administración & dosificación , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Ejercicios de Estiramiento Muscular , Terapia Neoadyuvante , Estadificación de Neoplasias , Sueño , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/inducido químicamente , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/etiología , Taxoides/uso terapéutico , Resultado del Tratamiento
9.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 16(1): 3-20, 2017 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27903842

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although epidemiological research demonstrates that there is an association between lifestyle factors and risk of breast cancer recurrence, progression of disease, and mortality, no comprehensive lifestyle change clinical trials have been conducted to determine if changing multiple risk factors leads to changes in biobehavioral processes and clinical outcomes in women with breast cancer. This article describes the design, feasibility, adherence to the intervention and data collection, and patient experience of a comprehensive lifestyle change clinical trial (CompLife). METHODS: CompLife is a randomized, controlled trial of a multiple-behavior intervention focusing on diet, exercise, and mind-body practice along with behavioral counseling to support change. The initial exposure to the intervention takes place during the 4 to 6 weeks of radiotherapy (XRT) for women with stage III breast cancer and then across the subsequent 12 months. The intervention group will have 42 hours of in-person lifestyle counseling during XRT (7-10 hours a week) followed by up to 30 hours of counseling via video connection for the subsequent 12 months (weekly sessions for 6 months and then monthly for 6 months). The primary outcome is disease-free survival. Multiple secondary outcomes are being evaluated, including: (1) biological pathways; (2) overall survival; (3) patient-reported outcomes; (4) dietary patterns/fitness levels, anthropometrics, and body composition; and (5) economic outcomes. Qualitative data of the patient experience in the trial is collected from exit interviews, concluding remarks, direct email correspondences, and web postings from patients. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients have been recruited and randomized to the trial to date. Accrual of eligible patients is high (72%) and dropout rates extremely low (5%). Attendance to the in-person sessions is high (95% attending greater than 80% of sessions) as well as to the 30 hours of video counseling (88% attending more than 70% of sessions). Adherence to components of the behavior change intervention is high and compliance with the intensive amount of data collection is exceptional. Qualitative data collected from the participants reveals testimonials supporting the importance of the comprehensive nature of intervention, especially the mind-body/mindfulness component and social support, and meaningful lifestyle transformations. CONCLUSION: Conducting a comprehensive, multicomponent, lifestyle change clinical trial for women with breast was feasible and collection of biobehavioral outcomes successful. Adherence to behavior change was high and patient experience was overwhelmingly positive.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama/psicología , Consejo/métodos , Dieta/psicología , Supervivencia sin Enfermedad , Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Persona de Mediana Edad , Recurrencia Local de Neoplasia/psicología , Cooperación del Paciente/psicología
10.
Psychooncology ; 26(11): 1936-1943, 2017 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27548839

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Sleep disturbances and fatigue are common in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Prior research suggests mind-body techniques may improve these outcomes. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of qigong/tai chi (QGTC) in men with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy. METHODS: Men with prostate cancer starting definitive radiation were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: (1) QGTC; (2) light exercise (LE); or (3) waiting list control. Sleep disturbances (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and fatigue (Brief Fatigue Inventory) were assessed at baseline, midway through radiotherapy (T2), during the last week of radiotherapy (T3), and at 1 (T4) and 3 months (T5) after the end of radiotherapy. Patients in the QGTC and LE groups attended three 40-minute classes per week throughout radiotherapy. RESULTS: Ninety patients were randomized to the 3 groups (QGTC = 26; LE = 26; waiting list control = 24). The QGTC group reported longer sleep duration midway through radiotherapy (QGTC = 7.01 h; LE = 6.42; WL = 6.50; P = .05), but this difference did not persist over time. There were no group differences in other domains of sleep or fatigue. Exploratory analyses conducted to examine the effect of health-related quality of life (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite and American Urological Association Symptom score) on sleep and fatigue showed significant correlations across multiple domains. CONCLUSIONS: Qigong/tai chi during radiation for prostate cancer resulted in superior sleep duration midway through radiation, but this effect was not durable, and there were no differences in other domains of sleep or fatigue. Exploratory analysis demonstrated that both sleep and fatigue were highly correlated with prostate cancer-related physical symptoms. Future mind-body intervention studies should incorporate multimodal therapy focused on improving physical symptoms in this population.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico , Fatiga/terapia , Neoplasias de la Próstata/radioterapia , Qigong , Calidad de Vida , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/terapia , Taichi Chuan , Listas de Espera , Anciano , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud , Neoplasias de la Próstata/psicología , Sueño , Texas
11.
Int J Cancer ; 128(5): 1151-68, 2011 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20830707

RESUMEN

Testing emerging technologies involves the evaluation of biologic plausibility, technical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, patient satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study was to select an effective classification algorithm for optical spectroscopy as an adjunct to colposcopy and obtain preliminary estimates of its accuracy for the detection of CIN 2 or worse. We recruited 1,000 patients from screening and prevention clinics and 850 patients from colposcopy clinics at two comprehensive cancer centers and a community hospital. Optical spectroscopy was performed, and 4,864 biopsies were obtained from the sites measured, including abnormal and normal colposcopic areas. The gold standard was the histologic report of biopsies, read 2 to 3 times by histopathologists blinded to the cytologic, histopathologic, and spectroscopic results. We calculated sensitivities, specificities, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and areas under the ROC curves. We identified a cutpoint for an algorithm based on optical spectroscopy that yielded an estimated sensitivity of 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.92-1.00] and an estimated specificity of 0.71 [95% CI = 0.62-0.79] in a combined screening and diagnostic population. The positive and negative predictive values were 0.58 and 1.00, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.85 (95% CI = 0.81-0.89). The per-patient and per-site performance were similar in the diagnostic and poorer in the screening settings. Like colposcopy, the device performs best in a diagnostic population. Alternative statistical approaches demonstrate that the analysis is robust and that spectroscopy works as well as or slightly better than colposcopy for the detection of CIN 2 to cancer.


Asunto(s)
Colposcopía , Análisis Espectral/métodos , Displasia del Cuello del Útero/diagnóstico , Algoritmos , Alphapapillomavirus/aislamiento & purificación , Femenino , Humanos , Curva ROC , Sensibilidad y Especificidad , Displasia del Cuello del Útero/virología
12.
Med Decis Making ; 26(3): 265-72, 2006.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16751325

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Data on direct non-health care and time costs are rarely collected, though the incorporation of such data is essential for performing cost-effectiveness analyses according to established guidelines. OBJECTIVES: To explore the challenges involved in collecting and analyzing these data from patients enrolled in a clinical trial. METHODS: Through the use of a pilot study, the authors designed a questionnaire to collect these costs. They used this questionnaire in a clinical trial conducted at a comprehensive cancer center and a public community hospital. Patients in the trial were undergoing screening or diagnostic procedures through a clinical protocol designed to measure the effectiveness of fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy for detecting cervical precancers. Direct non-health care costs were adjusted to 2003 constant dollars. RESULTS: The authors successfully collected direct non-health care and time cost data, thus demonstrating the feasibility of acquiring such data. Compared to patients receiving diagnostic services for cervical cancer, those receiving screening services for the same condition in both settings incurred lower direct non-health care costs and time costs, as defined in the questionnaire. Compared to patients receiving either service at the comprehensive cancer center, those seeking either service at the public community hospital incurred lower direct non-health care costs and time costs. When outliers were removed, total direct non-health care costs and time costs substantially decreased for diagnostic patients in the comprehensive cancer center; total direct non-health care costs and time costs for other subgroups remained essentially unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Direct non-health care and time cost data can be collected within a large-scale clinical trial. The setting (community v. specialty hospital) and population (patients receiving screening v. diagnostic examination) makes a difference regarding the cost totals. The order of magnitude of the final result depends on the context in which the non-health care and time cost data will be used.


Asunto(s)
Recolección de Datos , Tamizaje Masivo/estadística & datos numéricos , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/diagnóstico , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/prevención & control , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Tamizaje Masivo/economía , Persona de Mediana Edad , Proyectos Piloto , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
13.
Gynecol Oncol ; 101(1): 102-7, 2006 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16256181

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the role of religion/spirituality (R/S) and coping in quality of life (QOL) in 129 women immediately prior to a course of adjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. METHODS: Participants completed the COPE, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Ovarian (FACT-O), and the Systems of Belief Inventory-15R (SBI-15R). Women averaged 58.9 years of age (SD = 11.5) and were primarily Caucasian (86%), married (74%), and had received at least some college education (67%). Eighty-five percent of the participants had stage III or IV ovarian cancer at study entry. RESULTS: Correlational analyses revealed that R/S was associated with active coping (r = 0.23, P = 0.022), overall QOL (r = 0.25, P = 0.012), emotional and functional well-being (r = 0.24, P = 0.014 and r = 0.28, P = 0.004), and fewer ovarian cancer-specific concerns (r = 0.27, P = 0.006). In addition, active coping was related to overall QOL (r = 0.22, P = 0.029) and social and functional well-being (r = 0.20, P = 0.042 and r = 0.33, P = 0.001). Tests of mediation between these variables suggested that the positive associations between R/S and functional well-being and R/S and overall QOL were mediated through the use of active coping. CONCLUSION: Future studies are needed to better understand the complex relationships between R/S, coping, and QOL throughout the ovarian cancer treatment experience.


Asunto(s)
Adaptación Psicológica , Neoplasias Ováricas/psicología , Espiritualidad , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Quimioterapia Adyuvante , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias Ováricas/tratamiento farmacológico , Calidad de Vida , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Resultado del Tratamiento
15.
J Clin Oncol ; 22(4): 671-7, 2004 Feb 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-14966090

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To describe and assess the current utilization of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) in women with a diagnosis of either gynecologic or breast cancer and evaluate their reasons for use. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study included 250 female patients from the Multidisciplinary Breast Center and 250 patients from the Gynecologic Oncology Center of The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX). Patients were selected by having an odd-numbered medical record number, and they were contacted before their clinic visit. The goals of the study were explained, and verbal consent was obtained. Patients who agreed to participate were asked to bring a written list and the medication bottles of all over-the-counter prescriptions and CAMs with them to clinic. In clinic, the investigator obtained a written informed consent and administered the survey. All patients and surveys were assessable. RESULTS: The most frequently used herbal products and megavitamins/minerals were identified from the patient medication histories. Overall, we found the proportion of patients using CAM to be 48% (95% CI, 44% to 53%; 241 of 500 patients). CAM use was related to patients' educational status: 62% had postgraduate degrees, 50% had college degrees, 56% had some college, and 33% had a high school education or less. Also, among patients using CAMs, only 53.5% had spoken to a healthcare provider regarding CAM therapy. CONCLUSION: The use of CAM is common among women with cancer. Studies need to be conducted to establish if there are any potential drug interactions and/or therapeutic benefit of CAM products. Moreover, there is a need to educate patients and healthcare providers on appropriate and safe use of CAM products.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama/tratamiento farmacológico , Neoplasias de los Genitales Femeninos/tratamiento farmacológico , Fitoterapia , Preparaciones de Plantas/uso terapéutico , Vitaminas/uso terapéutico , Adulto , Distribución por Edad , Estudios de Cohortes , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Análisis Multivariante , Factores Socioeconómicos , Texas
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