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1.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 19: 1534735420941605, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32686504

RESUMEN

Background: There is increasing interest in complementary approaches such as Tai Chi (TC) and Qi Gong (QG) in oncology settings. We explored the effects of TC/QG delivered in group classes at a comprehensive cancer center. Methods: Patients and caregivers who participated in TC or QG completed assessments before and after an in-person group class. Assessments included questions about expectancy/satisfaction and common cancer symptoms (Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale [ESAS]). ESAS distress subscales analyzed included global (GDS), physical (PHS), and psychosocial (PSS). Results: Three hundred four participants (184 patients, 120 caregivers) were included in the analysis. At baseline, caregivers had a greater expectancy for change in energy level as a result of class participation compared with patients (22.9% vs 9.9%). No significant difference was observed between baseline patient and caregiver PSS. Clinically significant improvement in well-being was observed among patients in TC classes (1.0) and caregivers in QG classes (1.2). For fatigue, patients (1.4) and caregivers (1.0) participating in QG experienced clinically significant improvement. Both TC and QG classes were associated with clinically significant improvements (ESAS GDS decrease ≥3) in global distress for patients (TC = 4.52, SD= 7.6; QG = 6.05, SD = 7.9) and caregivers (TC = 3.73, SD = 6.3; QG = 4.02, SD = 7.8). Eighty-nine percent of participants responded that their expectations were met. Conclusions: Patients and caregivers participating in TC or QG group classes were satisfied overall and experienced significant improvement in global distress. Additional research is warranted to explore the integration of TC and QG in the delivery of supportive cancer care.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias , Qigong , Taichi Chuan , Cuidadores , Humanos , Neoplasias/terapia , Calidad de Vida , Autoinforme
2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(12): e1916910, 2019 12 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31808921

RESUMEN

Importance: Radiation-induced xerostomia (RIX) is a common, often debilitating, adverse effect of radiation therapy among patients with head and neck cancer. Quality of life can be severely affected, and current treatments have limited benefit. Objective: To determine if acupuncture can prevent RIX in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiation therapy. Design, Setting, and Participants: This 2-center, phase 3, randomized clinical trial compared a standard care control (SCC) with true acupuncture (TA) and sham acupuncture (SA) among patients with oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal carcinoma who were undergoing radiation therapy in comprehensive cancer centers in the United States and China. Patients were enrolled between December 16, 2011, and July 7, 2015. Final follow-up was August 15, 2016. Analyses were conducted February 1 through 28, 2019. Intervention: Either TA or SA using a validated acupuncture placebo device was performed 3 times per week during a 6- to 7-week course of radiation therapy. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was RIX, as determined by the Xerostomia Questionnaire in which a higher score indicates worse RIX, for combined institutions 1 year after radiation therapy ended. Secondary outcomes included incidence of clinically significant xerostomia (score >30), salivary flow, quality of life, salivary constituents, and role of baseline expectancy related to acupuncture on outcomes. Results: Of 399 patients randomized, 339 were included in the final analysis (mean [SD] age, 51.3 [11.7] years; age range, 21-79 years; 258 [77.6%] men), including 112 patients in the TA group, 115 patients in the SA group, and 112 patients in the SCC group. For the primary aim, the adjusted least square mean (SD) xerostomia score in the TA group (26.6 [17.7]) was significantly lower than in the SCC group (34.8 [18.7]) (P = .001; effect size = -0.44) and marginally lower but not statistically significant different from the SA group (31.3 [18.6]) (P = .06; effect size = -0.26). Incidence of clinically significant xerostomia 1 year after radiation therapy ended followed a similar pattern, with 38 patients in the TA group (34.6%), 54 patients in the SA group (47.8%), and 60 patients in the SCC group (55.1%) experiencing clinically significant xerostomia (P = .009). Post hoc comparisons revealed a significant difference between the TA and SCC groups at both institutions, but TA was significantly different from SA only at Fudan University Cancer Center, Shanghai, China (estimated difference [SE]: TA vs SCC, -9.9 [2.5]; P < .001; SA vs SCC, -1.7 [2.5]; P = .50; TA vs SA, -8.2 [2.5]; P = .001), and SA was significantly different from SCC only at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (estimated difference [SE]: TA vs SCC, -8.1 [3.4]; P = .016; SA vs SCC, -10.5 [3.3]; P = .002; TA vs SA, 2.4 [3.2]; P = .45). Conclusions and Relevance: This randomized clinical trial found that TA resulted in significantly fewer and less severe RIX symptoms 1 year after treatment vs SCC. However, further studies are needed to confirm clinical relevance and generalizability of this finding and to evaluate inconsistencies in response to sham acupuncture between patients in the United States and China. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01266044.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura/métodos , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/radioterapia , Traumatismos por Radiación/terapia , Xerostomía/terapia , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Calidad de Vida , Traumatismos por Radiación/etiología , Resultado del Tratamiento , Xerostomía/etiología , Adulto Joven
3.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 18: 1534735419848494, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31046489

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Acupuncture is a recognized integrative modality for managing hot flashes. However, data regarding predictors for response to acupuncture in cancer patients experiencing hot flashes are limited. We explored associations between patient characteristics, including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) diagnosis, and treatment response among cancer patients who received acupuncture for management of hot flashes. METHODS: We reviewed acupuncture records of cancer outpatients with the primary reason for referral listed as hot flashes who were treated from March 2016 to April 2018. Treatment response was assessed using the hot flashes score within a modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (0-10 scale) administered immediately before and after each acupuncture treatment. Correlations between TCM diagnosis, individual patient characteristics, and treatment response were analyzed. RESULTS: The final analysis included 558 acupuncture records (151 patients). The majority of patients were female (90%), and 66% had breast cancer. The median treatment response was a 25% reduction in the hot flashes score. The most frequent TCM diagnosis was qi stagnation (80%) followed by blood stagnation (57%). Older age ( P = .018), patient self-reported anxiety level ( P = .056), and presence of damp accumulation in TCM diagnosis ( P = .047) were correlated with greater hot flashes score reduction. CONCLUSIONS: TCM diagnosis and other patient characteristics were predictors of treatment response to acupuncture for hot flashes in cancer patients. Future research is needed to further explore predictors that could help tailor acupuncture treatments for these patients.


Asunto(s)
Sofocos/etiología , Sofocos/terapia , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Acupuntura/métodos , Terapia por Acupuntura/métodos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional China/métodos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Retrospectivos
4.
J Cancer ; 9(19): 3613-3619, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30310519

RESUMEN

Background: Increased access to complementary therapies such as acupuncture at academic medical centers has created new opportunities for management of cancer and cancer treatment related symptoms. Methods: Patients presenting for acupuncture treatment during calendar year 2016 at an outpatient integrative medicine clinic in a comprehensive cancer center were asked to complete a modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS; 16 symptoms, score 0-10, 10 worst possible) before and after each visit. ESAS subscales analyzed included global (GDS; score 0-90), physical (PHS, 0-60) and psychological distress (PSS, 0-20). ESAS symptom score change pre/post acupuncture treatment & from baseline visit to first follow up were evaluated by paired t-test. Results: Of 375 participants [mean age 55.6, 68.3% female, 73.9% white, most common cancer diagnosis of breast (32.8%) and thoracic/head & neck (25.9%)], 73.3% had at least one follow up acupuncture treatment [mean 4.6 (SD 5.1) treatments]. Highest/worst symptoms at baseline were poor sleep (3.92), fatigue (3.43), well-being (3.31), and pain (3.29). Statistically significant reduction/improvement (pre/post) was observed for all ESAS symptoms and subscales for the initial acupuncture treatment (p <0.001). Hot flashes had the highest mean reduction (-1.93), followed by fatigue (-1.72), numbness/tingling (-1.70), and nausea (-1.67). Clinically significant reductions were also observed for ESAS subscales of GDS (-12.2), PHS (-8.5), and PSS (-2.6). For symptom change from initial acupuncture treatment to first follow up (pre/pre), statistically and clinically significant improvement was observed for spiritual pain (-1.10; p<0.001) and ESAS subscale of GDS (-6.09; p=0.048). Clinical response rates (reduction ≥1) on follow up were highest for symptoms of spiritual pain (58.9%), dry mouth (57.8%) and nausea (57.3%). Conclusions: Outpatient acupuncture was associated with immediate & longitudinal significant improvement across a range of symptoms commonly experienced by individuals during cancer care. Further research is needed to better understand frequency of treatments needed in clinical practice to help maintain benefit.

5.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 17(1): 148-152, 2018 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28050924

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Use of complementary and integrative therapies is increasing among cancer patients, but data regarding the impact treatments such as acupuncture have in an inpatient oncology setting are limited. METHODS: Patients who received acupuncture in an inpatient hospital environment between December 2014 and December 2015 were asked to complete a modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS; 0-10 scale) before and after each visit. Pre- and post-treatment scores were examined for each symptom using paired t tests. RESULTS: A total of 172 inpatients were treated with acupuncture in their hospital beds (257 visits). Thirty percent (n = 51) received at least one additional follow-up treatment (mean visits/patient = 1.5). Completion rate of the modified ESAS after acupuncture was 42%. The most common reasons for not completing the post-treatment ESAS were "patient too drowsy" or "patient fell asleep" (72%). For patients who reported a baseline symptom score ≥1, the greatest improvements (mean change ± SD) after acupuncture on the initial visit were found for pain (-1.8 ± 2.2; n = 69; P < .0001), nausea (-1.2 ± 1.9; n = 30; P < .001), anxiety (-0.8 ± 1.8; n = 36; P = .01), drowsiness (-0.6 ± 1.8; n = 57; P = .02), and fatigue (-0.4 ± 1.1; n = 67; P = .008). For patients who received at least one follow-up visit, significant improvement from baseline was found for sleep disturbance (-2.5 ± 4.4; n = 17; P = .03), anxiety (-2.4 ± 1.7; n = 9; P = .002), pain (-2.3 ± 2.7; n = 20; P = .001), and drowsiness (-2.0 ± 2.6; n = 16; P = .008). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who received inpatient acupuncture at a major cancer center experienced significant improvement after treatment for pain, sleep disturbance, anxiety, drowsiness, nausea, and fatigue.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Neoplasias/terapia , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Hospitalización , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven
6.
Cancer ; 121(22): 3948-58, 2015 Nov 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26281028

RESUMEN

Hot flashes (HFs) are a common side effect of cancer treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate evidence related to the use of acupuncture for HFs in cancer patients. EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane (all databases), PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Scopus were searched from their inception through December 2014. Included studies had to be randomized controlled trials with a usual-care and/or placebo comparison group that investigated acupuncture to treat HFs in cancer patients. No language limits were applied. The risk of bias (ROB) was rated as low, high, or unclear according to Cochrane criteria. Both within-group and between-group changes were evaluated. Four hundred two items were identified, and 192 duplicates were omitted; this left 210 publications to be screened. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria, and all involved women with breast cancer. All studies showed significant within-group improvement from the baseline for true acupuncture (TA). One study showed significant improvement in favor of TA over sham acupuncture (SA; P < .001), 1 study found in favor of TA over SA for nighttime HFs only (P = .03), and 1 study found in favor of TA over SA or untreated controls (P < .01 and P < .001, respectively). Between-group (TA vs SA) effect size (ES) estimates for daytime and nighttime HFs were calculated (ES range, 0.04-0.9) whenever possible. No studies were rated with a low ROB. In conclusion, the current level of evidence is insufficient to either support or refute the benefits of acupuncture for the management of HFs in cancer patients. Future studies should provide within-group and between-group ES estimates in addition to P values.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Sofocos/terapia , Femenino , Humanos , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto
7.
Cancer ; 121(1): 84-92, 2015 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25204437

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Greater than 70% of patients with cancer experience chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. In the current study, the authors examined the effects of electrostimulation of the K1 acupoint located on the sole of the foot because it is believed to have the potential to control chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. METHODS: In this trial, 103 patients diagnosed with primary or metastatic liver cancer were recruited before transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) of cisplatin or oxaliplatin and randomized to either group A (51 patients who were treated with the antiemetic tropisetron and acustimulation at the K1 acupoint for 20 minutes approximately 1 to 2 hours before TAI on the first day and then daily for the subsequent 5 days) or group B (52 patients who were treated with tropisetron and electrostimulation at a placebo point on the heel). The rate, intensity, and duration of nausea and vomiting were collected at baseline and then daily for 5 days after TAI. Quality of life was assessed daily using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory and the EuroQoL scale. RESULTS: No differences were found between groups A and B with regard to the incidence and degree of nausea or vomiting on day 1 or the following 5 days. Patients in group A had better EuroQoL scores compared with patients in group B (72.83 in group A vs 65.94 in group B; P =.04) on day 4 but not on the other days. No group differences were noted at any time point for MD Anderson Symptom Inventory scores. CONCLUSIONS: Electrostimulation of K1 combined with antiemetics did not result in initial prevention of cisplatin-induced or oxaliplatin-induced nausea or vomiting.


Asunto(s)
Antieméticos/administración & dosificación , Antineoplásicos/efectos adversos , Electroacupuntura/métodos , Indoles/administración & dosificación , Náusea/prevención & control , Vómitos/prevención & control , Puntos de Acupuntura , Cisplatino/efectos adversos , Terapia Combinada , Talón/fisiología , Humanos , Neoplasias Hepáticas/tratamiento farmacológico , Neoplasias Hepáticas/patología , Náusea/inducido químicamente , Compuestos Organoplatinos/efectos adversos , Oxaliplatino , Tropisetrón , Vómitos/inducido químicamente
8.
Curr Oncol Rep ; 16(12): 418, 2014 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25325937

RESUMEN

In a previous systematic review of the worldwide literature of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving needle insertion into acupuncture points for symptom management in cancer patients, we identified only one high-quality RCT that was deemed to have a low risk of bias. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane (all databases), Scopus, and PubMed were searched from inception through December 2011 with no language limits applied. A total of 41 RCTs met all inclusion criteria and were rated. In the current review, we examined 18 trials published since our last report. The purpose of this update was to emphasize important recent findings and discuss how concerns such as blinding, separating non-specific placebo effects from specific needling effects, determining biologic mechanisms and dosing parameters, evaluating determinants of response such as expectation, controlling for sources of bias, and the lack of standardization in treatment and study methods may affect the interpretation of study results.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura , Antineoplásicos/efectos adversos , Artralgia/terapia , Fatiga/terapia , Sofocos/terapia , Náusea/terapia , Neoplasias/terapia , Xerostomía/terapia , Antineoplásicos/administración & dosificación , Artralgia/inducido químicamente , Medicina Basada en la Evidencia , Fatiga/etiología , Sofocos/etiología , Humanos , Náusea/etiología , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Resultado del Tratamiento , Xerostomía/inducido químicamente
9.
J Hematol Oncol ; 7: 41, 2014 May 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24886772

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This single-arm study evaluated feasibility, safety, and initial efficacy of electroacupuncture for thalidomide/bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy (PN) in cancer patients with multiple myeloma. METHODS: Patients with neuropathy ≥ grade 2 received 20 acupuncture treatments over 9 weeks. RESULTS: For the 19 evaluable patients, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecological Oncology Group-Neurotoxicity (FACT/GOG/NTX) mean (SD) scores improved significantly between baseline and week 13 (20.8 [9.6] vs 13.2 [8.5], p = 0.0002). Moderate effect size differences began on week 4, with the largest effect size differences found at week 9 for FACT/GOG/NTX scores, worst pain in the last 24 hours, and pain severity (Cohen's d = 1.43, 1.19, and 1.08, respectively) and continuing through week 13 (Cohen's d = 0.86, 0.88, and 0.90, respectively). From baseline to week 13, additional significant improvements were seen as follows: postural stability (1.0 [0.6] vs 0.8 [0.4], p = 0.02); coin test (10.0 [7.4] vs 5.6 [1.9], p < 0.0001); button test (96.1 [144.4] vs 54.9 [47.3], p < 0.0001); and walking test (21.6 [10.0] vs 17.2 [7.7], p = 0.0003). No significant changes were seen with NCS. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture may help patients experiencing thalidomide- or bortezomib-induced PN. Larger, randomized, clinical trials are needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00891618.


Asunto(s)
Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/efectos adversos , Electroacupuntura/métodos , Mieloma Múltiple/tratamiento farmacológico , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/inducido químicamente , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/terapia , Anciano , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/uso terapéutico , Ácidos Borónicos/administración & dosificación , Ácidos Borónicos/efectos adversos , Bortezomib , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Dimensión del Dolor/métodos , Pirazinas/administración & dosificación , Pirazinas/efectos adversos , Talidomida/administración & dosificación , Talidomida/efectos adversos , Factores de Tiempo , Resultado del Tratamiento
10.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 13(2): 133-40, 2014 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24282103

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Pain control is an ongoing challenge in the oncology setting. Prior to implementing a large randomized trial at our institution, we investigated the feasibility, safety, and initial efficacy of acupuncture for uncontrolled pain among cancer patients. HYPOTHESES: Our hypotheses were that the acupuncture treatments provided would be ( : ) feasible, ( : ) safe, and ( : ) a beneficial adjunct to pain management. STUDY DESIGN: This was a single arm, nonrandomized pragmatic pilot study. METHODS: Participants experiencing pain ≥4 on a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale received a maximum of 10 treatments on an individualized basis. Recruitment, attrition, compliance, and adverse events (AEs) were assessed. Pain (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form), quality of life (MD Anderson Symptom Inventory [MDASI]), and patient satisfaction were assessed at baseline and at the end of treatment. RESULTS: Of 115 patients screened, 52 (45%) were eligible and agreed to participate. Eleven (21%) were lost to follow-up, leaving 41 who completed all study procedures. No AEs were reported. Mean pain SEVERIT: was 6.0 ± 1.3 at baseline and 3.8 ± 2.0 at follow-up ( : < .0001). Pain INTERFERENC: was 6.2 ± 2.3 at baseline and 4.3 ± 2.8 at follow-up ( : < .0011). On the MDASI, the mean symptom SEVERIT: was 4.6 ± 1.8 at baseline and 3.2 ± 1.9 at follow-up ( : < .0001), and mean symptom INTERFERENC: was 5.8 ± 2.4 at baseline and 4.1 ± 2.9 at follow-up ( : < .002). Prescribed pain medications decreased across the course of the study. Patient satisfaction was high: 87% reported that their expectations were met "very well" or "extremely well"; 90% said they were likely to participate again; 95% said they were likely to recommend acupuncture to others; and 90% reported they found the service to be "useful" or "very useful." CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture was feasible, safe, and a helpful treatment adjunct for cancer patients experiencing uncontrolled pain in this study. Randomized placebo-controlled trials are needed to confirm these results.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura/métodos , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Manejo del Dolor/métodos , Dolor/fisiopatología , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Proyectos Piloto
11.
J Clin Oncol ; 31(7): 952-60, 2013 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23341529

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Many cancer centers offer acupuncture services. To date, a comprehensive systematic review of acupuncture in cancer care has not been conducted. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for symptom management in patients with cancer. METHODS: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane (all databases), Scopus, and PubMed were searched from inception through December 2011 for prospective randomized clinical trials (RCT) evaluating acupuncture for symptom management in cancer care. Only studies involving needle insertion into acupuncture points were included. No language limitations were applied. Studies were assessed for risk of bias (ROB) according to Cochrane criteria. Outcomes by symptom were designated as positive, negative, or unclear. RESULTS: A total of 2,151 publications were screened. Of those, 41 RCTs involving eight symptoms (pain, nausea, hot flashes, fatigue, radiation-induced xerostomia, prolonged postoperative ileus, anxiety/mood disorders, and sleep disturbance) met all inclusion criteria. One positive trial of acupuncture for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting had low ROB. Of the remaining studies, eight had unclear ROB (four positive, three negative, and one with unclear outcomes). Thirty-three studies had high ROB (19 positive, 11 negative, and three with both positive and negative outcomes depending on the symptom). CONCLUSION: Acupuncture is an appropriate adjunctive treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, but additional studies are needed. For other symptoms, efficacy remains undetermined owing to high ROB among studies. Future research should focus on standardizing comparison groups and treatment methods, be at least single-blinded, assess biologic mechanisms, have adequate statistical power, and involve multiple acupuncturists.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Neoplasias/terapia , Manejo del Dolor/métodos , Antineoplásicos/administración & dosificación , Antineoplásicos/efectos adversos , Ansiedad/etiología , Ansiedad/terapia , Medicina Basada en la Evidencia , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Sofocos/etiología , Sofocos/terapia , Humanos , Seudoobstrucción Intestinal/etiología , Seudoobstrucción Intestinal/terapia , Trastornos del Humor/etiología , Trastornos del Humor/terapia , Náusea/etiología , Náusea/terapia , Variaciones Dependientes del Observador , Dolor/etiología , Radioterapia/efectos adversos , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/etiología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/terapia , Resultado del Tratamiento , Xerostomía/etiología , Xerostomía/terapia
12.
Cancer ; 118(13): 3337-44, 2012 Jul 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22072272

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Xerostomia (dry mouth) after head/neck radiation is a common problem among cancer patients, and available treatments are of little benefit. The objective of this trial was to determine whether acupuncture can prevent xerostomia among head/neck patients undergoing radiotherapy. METHODS: A randomized, controlled trial among patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma was conducted comparing acupuncture to standard care. Participants were treated at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China. Forty patients were randomized to acupuncture treatment and 46 to standard care. Patients were treated 3×/wk on the same days they received radiotherapy. Subjective measures included the Xerostomia Questionnaire and MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN). Objective measures were unstimulated and stimulated whole salivary flow rates. Patients were followed for 6 months after the end of radiotherapy. RESULTS: Xerostomia Questionnaire scores for acupuncture were statistically significantly lower than for controls starting in week 3 through the 6 months (P = .003 at week 3, all other P < .0001), with clinically significant differences as follows: week 11, relative risk (RR) 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.87); 6 months, RR 0.38 (95% CI, 0.19-0.76). Similar findings were seen for MDASI-HN scores. Group differences emerged as early as 3 weeks into treatment for saliva (unstimulated whole salivary flow rate, P = .0004), with greater saliva flow in the acupuncture group at week 7 (unstimulated whole salivary flow rate, P < .0001; stimulated whole salivary flow rate, P = .002) and 11 (unstimulated whole salivary flow rate, P < .02; stimulated whole salivary flow rate, P < .03) and at 6 months (stimulated whole salivary flow rate, P < .003). CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture given concurrently with radiotherapy significantly reduced xerostomia and improved quality of life.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura/métodos , Neoplasias Nasofaríngeas/radioterapia , Traumatismos por Radiación/prevención & control , Radioterapia/efectos adversos , Xerostomía/prevención & control , Adulto , Carcinoma , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Carcinoma Nasofaríngeo , Calidad de Vida , Radioterapia/métodos , Adulto Joven
13.
World J Gastroenterol ; 16(1): 104-11, 2010 Jan 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20039456

RESUMEN

AIM: To examine whether acupuncture can prevent prolonged postoperative ileus (PPOI) after intraperitoneal surgery for colon cancer. METHODS: Ninety patients were recruited from the Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai, China. After surgery, patients were randomized to receive acupuncture (once daily, starting on postoperative day 1, for up to six consecutive days) or usual care. PPOI was defined as an inability to pass flatus or have a bowel movement by 96 h after surgery. The main outcomes were time to first flatus, time to first bowel movement, and electrogastroenterography. Secondary outcomes were quality of life (QOL) measures, including pain, nausea, insomnia, abdominal distension/fullness, and sense of well-being. RESULTS: No significant differences in PPOI on day 4 (P = 0.71) or QOL measures were found between the groups. There were also no group differences when the data were analyzed by examining those whose PPOI had resolved by day 5 (P = 0.69) or day 6 (P = 0.88). No adverse events related to acupuncture were reported. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture did not prevent PPOI and was not useful for treating PPOI once it had developed in this population.


Asunto(s)
Colectomía/efectos adversos , Neoplasias del Colon/cirugía , Electroacupuntura , Ileus/prevención & control , Adulto , Anciano , Defecación , Femenino , Motilidad Gastrointestinal , Humanos , Ileus/etiología , Ileus/fisiopatología , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Dolor Postoperatorio/etiología , Dolor Postoperatorio/prevención & control , Náusea y Vómito Posoperatorios/etiología , Náusea y Vómito Posoperatorios/prevención & control , Estudios Prospectivos , Calidad de Vida , Recuperación de la Función , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/etiología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/prevención & control , Factores de Tiempo , Insuficiencia del Tratamiento
14.
Am J Clin Oncol ; 32(3): 319-25, 2009 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19887992

RESUMEN

Thalidomide and bortezomib are remarkably efficacious in the treatment of multiple myeloma. Unfortunately, their use can cause sensory neuropathy, a common and serious adverse event that frequently limits dose and duration of treatment. Although the relationship between peripheral neuropathy and therapeutic dose is controversial, many authors have demonstrated a positive correlation between neuropathy and cumulative dose, dose intensity, and length of therapy. Peripheral neuropathic pain is the most troublesome symptom of neuropathy. Spontaneous pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and hyperpathia are often associated with decreased physical activity, increased fatigue, mood, and sleep problems. Symptoms are often difficult to manage, and available treatment options rarely provide total relief. Moreover, the adverse effects of these treatments often limit their use. Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy of acupuncture, with fewer adverse effects than analgesic drugs, in the treatment of painful diabetic and human immunodeficiency virus-related neuropathy. However, the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating toxic neuropathy has not been assessed. Although its putative mechanisms remain elusive, acupuncture has strong potential as an adjunctive therapy in thalidomide- or bortezomib-induced painful neuropathy, and a better understanding might guide its use in the management of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Well-designed clinical trials with adequate sample size and power are warranted.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura , Antineoplásicos/uso terapéutico , Mieloma Múltiple/tratamiento farmacológico , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/inducido químicamente , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/terapia , Animales , Antineoplásicos/efectos adversos , Ácidos Borónicos/uso terapéutico , Bortezomib , Humanos , Dolor/inducido químicamente , Manejo del Dolor , Pirazinas/uso terapéutico , Talidomida/uso terapéutico
15.
Head Neck ; 31(10): 1360-8, 2009 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19378325

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This pilot study evaluated if acupuncture can alleviate radiation-induced xerostomia among patients with cancer. Secondary objectives were to assess the effects of acupuncture on salivary flow and quality of life (QOL). METHODS: Nineteen patients received acupuncture twice a week for 4 weeks. RESULTS: Xerostomia inventory (XI) and patient benefit questionnaire (PBQ) scores were significantly better after acupuncture on weeks 4 and 8 than at baseline (XI: p = .0004 and .0001; PBQ: p = .0004 and .0011, respectively). For QOL at weeks 4 and 8, there was a significant difference for questions related to head/neck cancer (p = .04 and .006, respectively). At week 8, there was a significant difference in physical well-being (p = .04). At weeks 5 and 8, there were significant differences in the total score (p = .04 and .03, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture was effective for radiation-induced xerostomia in this small pilot study. Further research is needed.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/radioterapia , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/radioterapia , Neoplasias de la Lengua/radioterapia , Xerostomía/terapia , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias Nasofaríngeas/radioterapia , Proyectos Piloto , Calidad de Vida , Radioterapia/efectos adversos , Dosificación Radioterapéutica , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Xerostomía/etiología
16.
J Rehabil Res Dev ; 44(2): 195-222, 2007.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-17551873

RESUMEN

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of diverse medical and healthcare systems, therapies, and products that are not presently considered part of conventional medicine. This article provides an up-to-date review of the efficacy of selected CAM modalities in the management of chronic pain. Findings are presented according to the classification system developed by the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (formerly Office of Alternative Medicine) and are grouped into four domains: biologically based medicine, energy medicine, manipulative and body-based medicine, and mind-body medicine. Homeopathy and acupuncture are discussed separately as "whole or professionalized CAM practices." Based on the guidelines of the Clinical Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association, findings indicate that some CAM modalities have a solid track record of efficacy, whereas others are promising but require additional research. The article concludes with recommendations to pain practitioners.


Asunto(s)
Terapias Complementarias , Medicina Basada en la Evidencia , Manejo del Dolor , Enfermedad Crónica , Humanos
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