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1.
Integr Med Res ; 11(1): 100755, 2022 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34354922

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This study examined changes in spirituality and psychosocial outcomes among African American and rural adults participating in a culturally-adapted mind-body intervention. METHODS: African American (n = 22) and rural (n = 38) adults in Harmony & Health attended mind-body sessions twice a week for eight weeks and completed questionnaires on spirituality and psychosocial distress at baseline and post-intervention. Linear regression and repeated measures analyses were used to examine associations between intervention attendance and spirituality. RESULTS: Attendance was significantly associated with increased spirituality (ß=0.168, p = 013). Repeated measures analyses revealed a significant three-way interaction between attendance, spirituality, and study site (F(9,31)=2.891, p = 013). Urban African American participants who attended ≥75% of sessions reported greater increases in spirituality. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that mind-body practices may foster spirituality in urban African American adults. Additional adaptations are needed to strengthen spirituality in rural residents and to improve psychosocial health and wellbeing in this underserved population.

2.
Transl Behav Med ; 10(3): 546-554, 2020 08 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32766867

RESUMEN

Churches are well positioned to promote better mental health outcomes in underserved populations, including rural adults. Mind-body (MB) practices improve psychological well-being yet are not widely adopted among faith-based groups due to conflicting religious or practice beliefs. Thus, "Harmony & Health" (HH) was developed as a culturally adapted MB intervention to improve psychosocial health in urban churchgoers and was adapted and implemented in a rural church. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of HH to reduce psychosocial distress in rural churchgoers. HH capitalized on an existing church partnership to recruit overweight or obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥25.0 kg/m2) and insufficiently active adults (≥18 years old). Eligible adults participated in an 8 week MB intervention and completed self-reported measures of perceived stress, depressive symptoms, anxiety, and positive and negative affect at baseline and postintervention. Participants (mean [M] age = 49.1 ± 14.0 years) were mostly women (84.8%), non-Hispanic white (47.8%) or African American (45.7%), high socioeconomic status (65.2% completed ≥bachelor degree and 37.2% reported an annual household income ≥$80,000), and obese (M BMI = 32.6 ± 5.8 kg/m2). Participants reported lower perceived stress (t = -2.399, p = .022), fewer depressive symptoms (t = -3.547, p = .001), and lower negative affect (t = -2.440, p = .020) at postintervention. Findings suggest that HH was feasible, acceptable, and effective at reducing psychosocial distress in rural churchgoers in the short-term. HH reflects an innovative approach to intertwining spirituality and MB practices to improve physical and psychological health in rural adults, and findings lend to our understanding of community-based approaches to improve mental health outcomes in underserved populations.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Población Rural , Adolescente , Adulto , Índice de Masa Corporal , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Obesidad/prevención & control , Sobrepeso
3.
Transl Behav Med ; 10(4): 928-937, 2020 10 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30476343

RESUMEN

Physical activity reduces cancer risk, yet African American adults remain insufficiently active, contributing to cancer health disparities. Harmony & Health (HH) was developed as a culturally adapted mind-body intervention to promote physical activity, psychosocial well-being, and quality of life among a church-based sample of overweight/obese, insufficiently active African American adults. Men and women were recruited to the study through an existing church partnership. Eligible participants (N = 50) were randomized to a movement-based mind-body intervention (n = 26) or waitlist control (n = 24). Participants in the intervention attended 16 mind-body sessions over 8 weeks and completed a physical assessment, questionnaires on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and psychosocial factors, and accelerometry at baseline (T1), post-intervention (T2), and 6 week follow-up (T3). Eighty percent of participants (94% women, M age = 49.7 ± 9.4 years, M body mass index = 32.8 ± 5.2 kg/m2) completed the study, and 61.5% of intervention participants attended ≥10 mind-body sessions. Participants self-reported doing 78.8 ± 102.9 (median = 40.7, range: 0-470.7) min/day of MVPA and did 27.1 ± 20.7 (median = 22.0, range: 0-100.5) min/day of accelerometer-measured MVPA at baseline. Trends suggest that mind-body participants self-reported greater improvements in physical activity and psychosocial well-being from baseline to post-intervention than waitlist control participants. HH is feasible and acceptable among African American adults. Trends suggest that the mind-body intervention led to improvements in physical activity and psychosocial outcomes. This study extends the literature on the use of mind-body practices to promote physical and psychological health and reduce cancer disparities in African American adults.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano , Calidad de Vida , Acelerometría , Adulto , Ejercicio Físico , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad
4.
Complement Ther Med ; 40: 215-221, 2018 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30219453

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this qualitative study was twofold: (1) to better understand how yoga practitioners perceive intra- and interpersonal outcomes of their yoga practice, and (2) to develop a conceptual model of yoga effects on intra- and interpersonal outcomes that may underlie the "relational" influences of yoga. DESIGN: As part of a larger study, 107 community-dwelling yoga practitioners (age M=41.2±15.9years) completed open-ended questions which asked questions focusing on whether yoga influences one's relationship to oneself and to others. A subsample (n=12) completed in-depth interviews. The open-ended responses were analyzed using content analysis, and verbatim interview transcripts were analyzed for emergent themes using a constant comparison approach. RESULTS: Four emerging themes were identified such that practitioners talked about the ability of yoga to generate calm states, mindfulness, (self-)compassion, and a sense of connectedness. Throughout the themes, a common pattern emerged such that yoga practice first led to positive intrapersonal changes, which then influenced one's interpersonal relationships. Based on these results, a conceptual model was developed depicting potential pathways of how yoga works to enhance relational outcomes. CONCLUSION: Findings demonstrate the promise yoga holds to improve one's relationship to oneself (intrapersonal) through mindfulness and self-compassion, and to others (interpersonal), through the enhancement of compassion and social connectedness, which may potentially lead to enhanced health and wellbeing outcomes. Further empirical testing of the model is warranted.


Asunto(s)
Relaciones Interpersonales , Yoga/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Atención Plena , Investigación Cualitativa
5.
J Aging Phys Act ; 25(3): 351-359, 2017 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27834574

RESUMEN

Culturally appropriate, innovative strategies to increase physical activity (PA) in women of color are needed. This study examined whether participation in SALSA, an 8-week randomized, crossover pilot study to promote PA, led to improved psychosocial outcomes and whether these changes were associated with changes in PA over time. Women of color (N = 50) completed Internet-based questionnaires on PA, exercise self-efficacy, motivational readiness, stress, and social support at three time points. Women reported high socioeconomic status, decreases in exercise self-efficacy, and increases in motivational readiness for exercise and a number of stressful events (p < .05); changes in motivational readiness for exercise varied by group (p = .043). Changes in psychosocial factors were associated with increases in PA. Latin dance improved motivational readiness for PA. Future studies are needed to determine whether Latin dance improves other psychological measures and quality of life in women of color in an effort to increase PA and reduce health disparities.


Asunto(s)
Asistencia Sanitaria Culturalmente Competente/métodos , Danzaterapia/métodos , Ejercicio Físico/fisiología , Grupos Minoritarios/psicología , Salud de las Minorías/etnología , Adulto , Estudios Cruzados , Baile/psicología , Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Femenino , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Motivación , Proyectos Piloto , Psicología , Calidad de Vida , Apoyo Social , Resultado del Tratamiento
6.
Eat Behav ; 13(2): 179-82, 2012 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22365808

RESUMEN

African American (AA) and Hispanic or Latina (HL) women have the highest rates of overweight and obesity of any gender and ethnic groups. Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder in the United States and is linked to overweight and obesity. Traditional treatments for BED may not be appropriate or viable for AA and HL women, because they are less likely than whites to seek treatment for psychological conditions and may have less access to healthcare. Improving dietary habits in those with BED or subthreshold BED may reduce binge eating symptoms. The current study investigated the association of fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption to binge eating symptoms in AA and HL women. AA and HL women in the Health Is Power (HIP) study (N=283) reported fruit and vegetable intake, fat intake, and binge eating symptoms. Women were middle aged (M=45.8 years, SD=9.2) and obese (M BMI=34.5 kg/m(2), SD=7.5). Greater fat consumption was correlated with lower fruit and vegetable consumption (r(s)=-0.159, p<0.01). Higher BMI (r(s)=0.209, p<0.01), and greater fat consumption (r(s)=0.227, p<0.05) were correlated with increased binge eating symptoms. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that for HL women (ß=0.130, p=0.024), higher BMI (ß=0.148, p=0.012), and greater fat consumption (ß=0.196, p=0.001) were associated with increased binge eating symptoms (R(2)=0.086, F(3,278)=8.715, p<0.001). Findings suggest there may be a relationship between fat consumption and binge eating symptoms, warranting further study to determine whether improving dietary habits may serve as a treatment for BED in AA and HL women.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano/psicología , Bulimia/etnología , Grasas de la Dieta , Conducta Alimentaria/psicología , Frutas , Hispánicos o Latinos/psicología , Verduras , Índice de Masa Corporal , Bulimia/etiología , Bulimia/psicología , Dieta/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
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