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1.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38447621

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Concurrent chemoradiation to treat head and neck cancer (HNC) may result in debilitating toxicities. Targeted exercise such as yoga therapy may buffer against treatment-related sequelae; thus, this pilot RCT examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a yoga intervention. Because family caregivers report low caregiving efficacy and elevated levels of distress, we included them in this trial as active study participants. METHODS: HNC patients and their caregivers were randomized to a 15-session dyadic yoga program or a waitlist control (WLC) group. Prior to randomization, patients completed standard symptom (MDASI-HN) and patients and caregivers completed quality of life (SF-36) assessments. The 15-session program was delivered parallel to patients' treatment schedules. Participants were re-assessed at patients' last day of chemoradiation and again 30 days later. Patients' emergency department visits, unplanned hospital admissions and gastric feeding tube placements were recorded over the treatment course and up to 30 days later. RESULTS: With a consent rate of 76%, 37 dyads were randomized. Participants in the yoga group completed a mean of 12.5 sessions and rated the program as "beneficial." Patients in the yoga group had clinically significantly less symptom interference and HNC symptom severity and better QOL than those in the WLC group. They were also less likely to have a hospital admission (OR = 3.00), emergency department visit (OR = 2.14), and/or a feeding tube placement (OR = 1.78). CONCLUSION: Yoga therapy appears to be a feasible, acceptable, and possibly efficacious behavioral supportive care strategy for HNC patients undergoing chemoradiation. A larger efficacy trial is warranted.

2.
Cancer Med ; 12(6): 7567-7579, 2023 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36468605

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Despite their significant distress, supportive care interventions for caregivers of glioma patients are generally lacking. And, whether caregivers are more likely to benefit from interventions targeting patient-caregiver dyads or caregivers individually is unknown. This pilot randomized controlled trial compared the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a dyadic yoga (DY) versus an individual caregiver yoga (CY) intervention as a supportive care strategy for family caregivers. METHODS: Patient-caregiver dyads were randomized to a DY, CY or usual care (UC) arm. DY and CY interventions were delivered over 15 sessions. Caregivers completed assessments of their depressive symptoms, quality of life (QOL), and caregiving reactions at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks, and a subset completed qualitative interviews at 12 weeks. RESULTS: With a consent rate of 63%, 67 dyads were randomized. Attendance in the DY was higher than in the CY group (session means, DY = 12.23, CY = 9.00; p = 0.06). Caregivers (79% female; 78% non-Hispanic White; mean age, 53 years) reported significantly more subjective benefit in the CY arm than in the DY arm (d = 2.1; p < .01), which was consistent with the qualitative assessment. There were medium effect sizes for improved mental QOL (d = 0.46) and financial burden (d = 0.53) in favor of the CY over the UC group. Caregivers in the CY group reported more caregiving esteem (d = 0.56) and less health decline (d = 0.60) than those in the DY group. CONCLUSION: Individual rather than dyadic delivery may be a superior supportive care approach for this vulnerable caregiver population. A larger, adequately powered efficacy trial is warranted.


Asunto(s)
Glioma , Yoga , Humanos , Femenino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Masculino , Cuidadores , Calidad de Vida , Glioma/radioterapia
3.
Psychooncology ; 31(9): 1581-1588, 2022 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35726392

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Lung cancer patients, particularly women, are vulnerable to experience disease-related stigma, which is linked to greater psychological distress and worse treatment outcomes. To inform future stigma-resilience interventions, we examined if mindfulness, self-compassion, and social support might buffer the associations between perceived lung cancer stigma and psychological and cancer-related symptoms. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, women with recently diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer undergoing cancer treatment completed measures of Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale, depressive (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), stress (Impact of Events Scale) and cancer-related (MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Lung Cancer) symptoms, mindfulness (Mindful Attention Awareness Scale), self-compassion (Self-Compassion Scale), and social support (Social Provisions Scale). RESULTS: The sample included 56 women (mean age = 65 years; 71% non-Hispanic White; 50% college educated; 74% advanced stage) who had consented to participate in an online support group study. Most (70%) had a smoking history and reported moderate levels of stigma (M = 36.28, SD = 10.51). Based on general linear modeling, mindfulness moderated the associations between stigma and depressive symptoms (F = 5.78, p = 0.02), cancer-related stress (F = 12.21, p = 0.002), and cancer-related symptom severity (F = 4.61, p = 0.04), such that, only for women scoring low in mindfulness, the associations between stigma and symptoms were significant. For those scoring high in mindfulness, the associations between stigma and symptoms were not significant supporting a buffering effect. Self-compassion and social support did not significantly moderate the stigma and symptom associations. CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of mindfulness may protect women from psychological and cancer-related symptoms typically associated with the stigmatizing experience of a lung cancer diagnosis. Yet, longitudinal studies and randomized controlled designs are needed to identify mindfulness as a causal protective factor.


Asunto(s)
Carcinoma de Pulmón de Células no Pequeñas , Neoplasias Pulmonares , Atención Plena , Anciano , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/psicología , Neoplasias Pulmonares/terapia , Estigma Social
4.
Oncol Nurs Forum ; 49(2): 151-157, 2022 03 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35191902

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To describe the experience of caregivers who have lost a partner to a central nervous system (CNS) tumor. PARTICIPANTS & SETTING: 8 bereaved partners of patients with CNS tumors enrolled in a dyadic, behavioral randomized controlled trial at a comprehensive cancer center in the southern United States. METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: Participants took part in a semistructured qualitative interview to describe the experience of their partner's death. Descriptive exploratory analysis was used to identify themes emerging from the interviews. FINDINGS: Themes identified from bereaved participants' experiences were related to caring for their partner, separating from their partner on patient death, and continuing without their partner following patient death. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Bereaved partners of patients with CNS tumors described how difficult it was to experience the patient's health decline and feeling unprepared for the patient's death, regardless of advance notice. Interventions targeting caregiver distress to improve their experience prior to and following the patient's death are needed.


Asunto(s)
Aflicción , Neoplasias del Sistema Nervioso Central , Cuidadores , Pesar , Humanos , Investigación Cualitativa
5.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 20: 15347354211052520, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34663123

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The goal of this pilot randomized controlled trial was to examine the feasibility and acceptability of delivering group-based psychosocial care via videoconference (ie, Zoom) to women with lung cancer undergoing treatment. METHODS: At baseline, women indicated their typical computer and internet use and were then randomized to a group-based intervention that either focused on mindfulness training or psychoeducation. Participants completed 1 Zoom "practice run" prior to starting the 5 group sessions (1 per week). After the last session, they evaluated their experiences with the intervention and its delivery. RESULTS: With a consent rate of 68%, 54 women (mean age = 66 years; 69% non-Hispanic White; 48% with stage IV disease) were equally randomized. Attendance was high in both arms (session mean, mindfulness = 4.38; education = 4.75; 85% attended all sessions). Across arms, all women rated the program as useful; most preferred group-based delivery (67%) and remote delivery (50%) or had no preference. Although the sample's typical computer use was relatively low (eg, 19% said that they rarely or never use a computer), most women (76%) indicated that Zoom was "very easy" or "easy" to use. After only 0 to 1 attempts, 56% felt comfortable but 26% stated that they never felt comfortable with the technology. CONCLUSIONS: It seems to be feasible to deliver group-based psychosocial interventions via videoconference in women with lung cancer undergoing treatment. Challenges regarding scheduling the group sessions and familiarizing older rather than infrequent computer users with the technology were encountered but resolved over the course of the trial.


Asunto(s)
Carcinoma de Pulmón de Células no Pequeñas , Neoplasias Pulmonares , Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica , Anciano , Carcinoma de Pulmón de Células no Pequeñas/terapia , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/terapia , Proyectos Piloto , Comunicación por Videoconferencia
6.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 20: 15347354211019111, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34036820

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The acceptability of videoconferencing delivery of yoga interventions in the advanced cancer setting is relatively unexplored. The current report summarizes the challenges and solutions of the transition from an in-person (ie, face-to-face) to a videoconference intervention delivery approach in response to the Coronavirus Disease pandemic. METHOD: Participants included patient-family caregiver dyads who were enrolled in ongoing yoga trials and 2 certified yoga therapists who delivered the yoga sessions. We summarized their experiences using recordings of the yoga sessions and interventionists' progress notes. RESULTS: Out of 7 dyads participating in the parent trial, 1 declined the videoconferenced sessions. Participants were between the ages of 55 and 76 and mostly non-Hispanic White (83%). Patients were mainly male (83%), all had stage III or IV cancer and were undergoing radiotherapy. Caregivers were all female. Despite challenges in the areas of technology, location, and setting, instruction and personal connection, the overall acceptability was high among patients, caregivers, and instructors. Through this transition process, solutions to these challenges were found, which are described here. CONCLUSION: Although in-person interventions are favored by both the study participants and the interventionists, videoconference sessions were deemed acceptable. All participants had the benefit of a previous in-person experience, which was helpful and perhaps necessary for older and advanced cancer patients requiring practice modifications. In a remote setting, the assistance of caregivers seems particularly beneficial to ensure practice safety. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT03948100; NCT02481349.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/epidemiología , Cuidadores , Neoplasias/terapia , Comunicación por Videoconferencia , Yoga , Adulto , Anciano , Actitud del Personal de Salud , COVID-19/psicología , Cuidadores/psicología , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Meditación/métodos , Meditación/psicología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias/psicología , Pandemias , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/psicología , Percepción , Telemedicina/métodos , Telemedicina/organización & administración , Resultado del Tratamiento , Yoga/psicología
7.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 61(5): 898-908.e1, 2021 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33039605

RESUMEN

CONTEXT: Patients with metastatic lung cancer and their spousal caregivers are at high risk of psychological symptoms. Mindfulness may improve psychological symptoms via spiritual well-being (SW); yet, this mediation model has not been examined in a dyadic context. OBJECTIVES: We examined the mediating role of two dimensions of SW (meaning/peace and faith) in the mindfulness-symptoms link in Stage IV lung cancer patients and their spousal caregivers. METHODS: We examined the actor-partner interdependence model of mediation using multivariate multilevel modeling with 78 couples. Four actor-partner interdependence model of mediation analyses were conducted to examine one predictor (mindfulness) × two mediators (meaning/peace and faith) × two psychological symptoms (depressive symptoms and cancer distress). We also tested four alternative models in which mindfulness mediates the associations between SW and psychological symptoms. RESULTS: The alternative model (SW → mindfulness → psychological symptoms) was preferred than the original model (mindfulness → SW → psychological symptoms). For patients, meaning/peace was directly associated with their own psychological symptoms, whereas faith was only indirectly associated with their own psychological symptoms via mindfulness. For spouses, meaning/peace was both directly and indirectly associated with their own psychological symptoms, whereas faith was only directly associated with their own depressive symptoms (but not cancer distress). Moreover, spouses' faith was indirectly associated with patients' psychological symptoms through patients' mindfulness. CONCLUSION: SW is associated with patients' and spouses' psychological symptoms both directly and indirectly through mindfulness. Thus, interventions that target SW, particularly meaning and peace, along with mindfulness may be beneficial to the psychological management of patients facing a terminal disease and their spousal caregivers.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias Pulmonares , Atención Plena , Adaptación Psicológica , Cuidadores , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/terapia , Calidad de Vida , Espiritualidad , Esposos
8.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 19: 1534735420945769, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32830556

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cancer patients frequently use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and spirituality has been associated with CAM use among patients. We evaluated how oncologists' spirituality and religiosity are associated with personal use and patient recommendations for CAM. METHODS: A survey was mailed to 1000 medical oncologists in the United States. The questionnaire asked about oncologists' approaches to CAM use by patients, focusing on the use of herbs and supplement (HS), and about religiosity and spirituality. RESULTS: Of 937 deliverable questionnaires, 392 were returned (response rate 42%). Respondents were mostly men (71%) and Caucasian (76%), with a median age of 48. Approximately 16% reported no religion, 19% Jewish, 24% Catholic, 28% Christian, and 13% other religions. Eighteen percent reported attending religious services at least once a week, including 15% who attend several times per week. Twenty-eight percent reported high theological pluralism (skepticism regarding whether one religion is comprehensively and uniquely true); 58% described themselves as moderately or very spiritual. Self-reported spirituality and religious service attendance were associated with using CAM personally and recommending HS to patients. In multivariate analyses, moderate-high spirituality and attending religious services less than monthly was positively associated with personal use of CAM: odds ratio (OR) = 3.10 (confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-6.5) and OR = 3.04 (CI = 1.5-6.6), respectively. Physicians with moderate to high spirituality were more likely to report recommending CAM in general (OR = 3.07, CI = 1.3-7.1), but less likely to report recommending HS (OR = 0.33, CI = 0.14-0.75). CONCLUSION: Self-reported spirituality is a significant factor among US oncologists' decision to use CAM and recommend CAM to patients.


Asunto(s)
Terapias Complementarias , Oncólogos , Médicos , Humanos , Masculino , Religión , Religión y Medicina , Espiritualidad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
9.
Oncologist ; 25(11): e1794-e1802, 2020 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32621630

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although mindfulness-based interventions have been widely examined in patients with nonmetastatic cancer, the feasibility and efficacy of these types of programs are largely unknown for those with advanced disease. We pilot-tested a couple-based meditation (CBM) relative to a supportive-expressive (SE) and a usual care (UC) arm targeting psychospiritual distress in patients with metastatic lung cancer and their spousal caregivers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventy-five patient-caregiver dyads completed baseline self-report measures and were then randomized to one of the three arms. Couples in the CBM and SE groups attended four 60-minute sessions that were delivered via videoconference. All dyads were reassessed 1 and 3 months later. RESULTS: A priori feasibility benchmarks were met. Although attendance was high in both groups, dyads in the CBM group indicated greater benefit of the sessions than those in the SE group (patients, CBM mean = 2.63, SE mean = 2.20, p = .003; spouses, CBM mean = 2.71, SE mean = 2.00, p = .005). Compared with the UC group, patients in the CBM group reported significantly lower depressive symptoms (p = .05; d = 0.53) and marginally reduced cancer-related stress (p = .07; d = 0.68). Medium effect sizes in favor of the CBM compared with the SE group for depressive symptoms (d = 0.59) and cancer-related stress (d = 0.54) were found. Spouses in the CBM group reported significantly lower depressive symptoms (p < .01; d = 0.74) compared with those in the UC group. CONCLUSION: It seems feasible and possibly efficacious to deliver dyadic interventions via videoconference to couples coping with metastatic lung cancer. Mindfulness-based interventions may be of value to managing psychological symptoms in the palliative care setting. Clinical trial identification number. NCT02596490 IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The current randomized controlled trial has established that a mindfulness approach to the management of patients' and spouses' psychospiritual concerns is acceptable and subjectively deemed more beneficial than a supportive-expressive treatment for patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We also revealed that videoconference delivery, here FaceTime, is an acceptable approach even for geriatric patients with metastatic NSCLC and that patients and their spousal caregivers prefer a dyadic delivery of this type of supportive care strategy. Lastly, this trial has laid the foundation for the role of mindfulness-based interventions in the palliative care setting supporting patients with advanced NSCLC and their spousal caregivers.


Asunto(s)
Carcinoma de Pulmón de Células no Pequeñas , Neoplasias Pulmonares , Atención Plena , Anciano , Carcinoma de Pulmón de Células no Pequeñas/terapia , Cuidadores , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/terapia , Proyectos Piloto , Calidad de Vida , Esposos
10.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 60(4): 737-745.e3, 2020 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32387140

RESUMEN

CONTEXT: Past religiosity/spirituality (R/S) research has mainly relied on self-report instruments, which may result in self-presentation and defensive biases. OBJECTIVES: To address these limitations, we reviewed the writing samples that were generated as part of an expressive writing (EW) trial, coded the samples for R/S content, and examined cross-sectional and prospective associations between R/S content and symptom and psychosocial outcomes. METHODS: Participants diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma who were randomized to the EW arm completed a standard writing protocol. Before randomization, they completed validated measures of R/S, depressive symptoms, social support, fatigue, and sleep disturbances and one, four, and 10 months after completing the intervention. Writing samples were coded for positive and negative religious coping (RC), and personal (e.g., private prayer) and collective (e.g., church attendance) religious engagement (RE). RESULTS: Of the 138 patients, 117 provided at least one writing sample, and 89% of participants made at least one R/S reference with 70% including at least one positive RC statement, and 45.3% revealed personal and 42.3% collective RE. Negative RC was rare (8%). Although positive RC and RE were significantly associated with the R/S Index (P < 0.01), negative RC was not. In prospective analyses, RE was associated with reduced cancer-related symptoms over time (P = 0.04), and negative RC was associated with increased psychological distress over time (P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Behavioral coding of EW samples supported the literature suggesting that positive RC is common among patients with cancer. Although negative RC may be relatively rare, it may be associated with psychological distress.


Asunto(s)
Carcinoma de Células Renales , Neoplasias Renales , Adaptación Psicológica , Carcinoma de Células Renales/terapia , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Neoplasias Renales/terapia , Estudios Prospectivos , Espiritualidad , Escritura
11.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 59(6): 1260-1267, 2020 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32061834

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Although patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors and their partners are at risk of experiencing high symptom burden, they are often excluded from psychosocial intervention studies. Thus, we sought to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a couple-based meditation (CBM) program targeting symptom and well-being outcomes. METHODS: Couples completed baseline measures assessing symptom and well-being outcomes and were randomized to the CBM or a usual care control group. Couples in the CBM groups attended four weekly (60 minutes each) therapist-led sessions that were delivered via FaceTime (Apple Inc, Cupertino, CA). The CBM program focused on cultivating mindfulness, compassion, gratitude and purpose, and integrated emotional disclosure exercises. Both groups were reassessed six and 12 weeks after baseline. RESULTS: We approached 60 eligible dyads, of which 37 (62%) consented, 35 (95%) were randomized, and 22 (63%) completed all assessments. Couples in the CBM group attended a mean of 3.33 sessions (SD 1.09). For patients, significant group differences in favor of the CBM group were found for cognitive (d = 1.05) and general disease symptoms (d = 0.93), and relationship well-being (d = 0.68) and compassion (d = 0.96). No significant group differences were revealed for partners. CONCLUSION: It seems to be feasible, acceptable, and possibly efficacious to deliver a dyadic intervention via FaceTime to brain tumor couples. Although both patients and partners in the CBM group rated the intervention as beneficial, significant group differences with medium-to-large effect sizes were only found for patients.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias Encefálicas , Meditación , Atención Plena , Neoplasias Encefálicas/terapia , Empatía , Humanos , Proyectos Piloto
12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31367462

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although the diagnosis and treatment of a primary brain tumor present unique challenges to patients and their family caregivers, evidence-based supportive care interventions are generally lacking. The primary aim of this research protocol is to determine the feasibility of implementing a dyadic yoga (DY) versus a caregiver yoga (CY) intervention or a wait-list control (WLC) group using a randomized controlled trial design. METHODS: Seventy-five glioma patients undergoing radiotherapy and their family caregivers are randomized to the DY, CY, or a WLC group. Patient-caregiver dyads in the DY group and caregivers in the CY group receive 15 sessions (45 min each) over the course of patients' standard radiotherapy (6 weeks). Patients and caregivers in all groups complete baseline assessments of symptoms, quality of life (QOL), and health utilization outcomes prior to randomization. Follow-up assessments are performed 6 weeks and then again 3 months later. The primary outcome is feasibility (i.e., ≥ 50% of eligible dyads consent, ≥ 70% of enrolled dyads complete all assessments, and ≥ 50% of all practice sessions are attended). We will also perform primarily descriptive analyses of the self-reported outcomes (e.g., fatigue, overall QOL) and explore potential intervention moderators (e.g., performance status) to inform a larger future trial. CONCLUSION: This trial will provide important information regarding the feasibility of a dyadic versus a caregiver yoga intervention regarding symptom, QOL, and health utilization outcomes in glioma patients and their caregivers. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02481349.

13.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 18: 1534735419866923, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31364416

RESUMEN

Background: This small qualitative study reports on the experiences of patients and family caregivers who participated in a dyadic yoga pilot trial while undergoing cancer treatment in the midst of Hurricane Harvey. Our primary purpose was to determine if participants implemented components of the program to cope with the stressors associated with Hurricane Harvey and if they perceived benefits from the yoga practices. Methods: We administered brief semistructured interviews to the dyads participating in a dyadic yoga pilot trial. Participants (n = 5 dyads) were asked to discuss their experience with Hurricane Harvey, including factors that helped them cope with the event while receiving treatment. Result: Patients had a mean age of 55.6 years, were mostly non-Hispanic White, male, and had advance stage head and neck cancer. Caregivers had a mean age of 58 years and were mainly non-Hispanic White and female. Analyses of the interviews revealed 2 overarching themes: (1) the storm's negative impact and (2) the use of yoga to cope with the hurricane-related stressors. Conclusions: Patient-caregiver dyads experienced psychological distress during the storm and/or its aftermath. Dyads used yoga techniques to cope with these psychological stressors. Yoga served as a means of social support as dyads either participated in these activities together or with other family members.


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores/psicología , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/psicología , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Yoga/psicología , Adaptación Psicológica/fisiología , Adulto , Anciano , Tormentas Ciclónicas , Manejo de la Enfermedad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Meditación/psicología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Desastres Naturales , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Apoyo Social , Adulto Joven
14.
Psychooncology ; 28(3): 615-621, 2019 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30659739

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) may result in toxicities that are associated with performance declines and poor quality of life (QOL) for patients and their family caregivers. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to establish feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a dyadic yoga (DY) intervention as a supportive care strategy. METHODS: Patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung or esophageal cancer undergoing TRT and their caregivers (N = 26 dyads) were randomized to a 15-session DY or a waitlist control (WLC) group. Prior to TRT and randomization, both groups completed measures of QOL (SF-36) and depressive symptoms (CES-D). Patients also completed the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Dyads were reassessed on the last day of TRT and 3 months later. RESULTS: A priori feasibility criteria were met regarding consent (68%), adherence (80%), and retention (81%) rates. Controlling for relevant covariates, multilevel modeling analyses revealed significant clinical improvements for patients in the DY group compared with the WLC group for the 6MWT (means: DY = 473 m vs WLC = 397 m, d = 1.19) and SF-36 physical function (means: DY = 38.77 vs WLC = 30.88; d = .66) and social function (means: DY = 45.24 vs WLC = 39.09; d = .44) across the follow-up period. Caregivers in the DY group reported marginally clinically significant improvements in SF-36 vitality (means: DY = 53.05 vs WLC = 48.84; d = .39) and role performance (means: DY = 52.78 vs WLC = 48.59; d = .51) relative to those in the WLC group. CONCLUSIONS: This novel supportive care program appears to be feasible and beneficial for patients undergoing TRT and their caregivers. A larger efficacy trial with a more stringent control group is warranted.


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores/psicología , Depresión/psicología , Neoplasias Esofágicas/psicología , Neoplasias Pulmonares/psicología , Yoga/psicología , Adaptación Psicológica , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Proyectos Piloto , Calidad de Vida , Ajuste Social
15.
Support Care Cancer ; 27(1): 139-145, 2019 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29948392

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The literature suggests that psychological distress and quality of life are interdependent in couples coping with cancer. The current study seeks to extend these findings to physical symptom burden, examining differences in symptom self-rating and perception of partner symptoms. METHODS: Couples were approached while waiting for an integrative oncology service. Fifty patients and their partners completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS-FS; twelve symptoms, scores 0-10, 10 worst possible) and a Global Health measure (PROMIS10). Patient and partner each also completed the ESAS-FS as it related to their perception of the other's symptoms. ESAS distress subscales analyzed included Global (GDS), Psychosocial (PSS), and Physical (PHS). Analyses included paired t tests to examine all measures. RESULTS: Fifty-eight percent of patients were female with most common cancer diagnoses of breast (22%), gastrointestinal (16%), and thoracic/H&N (16%). For ESAS-FS self-ratings, patients had significantly higher physical distress than partners, with a no significant difference in psychosocial distress. For PROMIS10 self-ratings, patients reported significantly lower global health and physical health, (p's < 0.001); no differences were found for mental health between patients and caregivers. Patient rating of partner physical distress (PHS, p = 0.01) was significantly higher than partner self-rating, with no significant difference observed in ratings for psychosocial distress. Partner rating of patient psychosocial distress (PSS, p < 0.001) and physical distress (PHS, p = 0.001) was significantly higher than that of patient self-rating. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that both patients and partners perceive physical distress of the other higher than self; however, patients may be more sensitive to psychosocial distress in their partners.


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores/psicología , Neoplasias/psicología , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Parejas Sexuales/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Medición de Resultados Informados por el Paciente , Percepción
16.
J Altern Complement Med ; 24(12): 1204-1213, 2018 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29883196

RESUMEN

Objectives: Few studies have examined the use of complementary health practices (e.g., mind/body practices and dietary supplements) among African Americans, particularly those who identify as being spiritual and/or religious. Furthermore, research on the health and health behavior profiles of such complementary health users is scant. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of complementary health practices and their lifestyle and health indicator correlates in a large, church-based African American population. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of 1467 African American adults drawn from a church-based cohort study. Participants reported use of complementary health practices, lifestyle behaviors (e.g., diet and smoking status), and health indicators (e.g., physical health and medical problems). Multiple logistic regressions were conducted to examine associations between lifestyle variables, health indicators, and use of complementary health practices. Outcome measures: Outcomes included prevalence of mind/body practices (e.g., meditation and Reiki) and dietary supplements (multivitamins) along with health indicator and lifestyle correlates of use. Results: Use of complementary health practices was high; 40% reported using any mind/body practice and 50% reported using dietary supplements. Poorer physical health was associated with use of mind/body practices, while likelihood of meeting fruit and vegetable recommendations was significantly associated with dietary supplement use. Conclusions: Complementary health practices were used heavily in a church-based sample of African American adults. Poorer physical health was associated with use of complementary health practices, yet users also displayed health conscious behaviors. Given the high engagement in complementary health practices, it may be prudent to consider adapting complementary health approaches for use in wellness interventions targeting African Americans in faith-based settings.


Asunto(s)
Negro o Afroamericano/educación , Negro o Afroamericano/psicología , Terapias Complementarias/educación , Terapias Complementarias/psicología , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Enfermeras Parroquiales/métodos , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios de Cohortes , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estados Unidos
17.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 55(3): 953-961, 2018 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29208478

RESUMEN

CONTEXT: Given the generally incurable nature of metastatic lung cancer, patients and their spouses/partners are at risk for psychological and spiritual distress. To address this concern, we developed a couple-based mind-body (CBMB) intervention. OBJECTIVES: This formative research aimed at examining the intervention's acceptability and initial efficacy in patients with metastatic lung cancer undergoing treatment and their spouses. METHODS: Intervention content evaluation sessions and an ensuing single-arm trial were conducted. To evaluate intervention content, participants performed intervention exercises and then participated in semistructured interviews and completed written evaluations. In the single-arm trial, four intervention sessions were delivered over two weeks, focusing on cultivating mindfulness, interpersonal connection, gratitude, and purpose. Newly recruited couples completed measures of depressive symptoms, cancer distress, spiritual well-being, and sleep disturbances before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Content evaluations by seven dyads of patients and their partners revealed high acceptability ratings for the CBMB intervention (e.g., all participants would recommend the intervention). Consent and adherence rates (54% and 67%, respectively) were acceptable in the single-arm trial. All patients (n = 7 dyads; 67% male; mean age, 55 years) and partners (33% male; mean age, 59 years) rated the intervention as useful. Paired t-test analyses revealed large effect sizes for reduced sleep disturbances (d = 1.83) and medium effect sizes for cancer-specific distress (d = 0.61) for patients and large effect sizes for depressive symptoms (d = 0.90) for partners. CONCLUSION: Based on these results, the CBMB intervention appears to be acceptable and subjectively useful. In addition, we observed preliminary evidence of quality of life gains in both patients and their partners.


Asunto(s)
Carcinoma de Pulmón de Células no Pequeñas/psicología , Carcinoma de Pulmón de Células no Pequeñas/terapia , Terapias Mente-Cuerpo , Esposos/psicología , Anciano , Carcinoma de Pulmón de Células no Pequeñas/patología , Depresión/etiología , Depresión/terapia , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Metástasis de la Neoplasia/terapia , Proyectos Piloto , Calidad de Vida , Parejas Sexuales/psicología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/terapia , Espiritualidad , Estrés Psicológico/etiología , Estrés Psicológico/terapia , Resultado del Tratamiento
18.
Cancer ; 124(1): 36-45, 2018 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28940301

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The current randomized trial examined the effects of a Tibetan yoga program (TYP) versus a stretching program (STP) and usual care (UC) on sleep and fatigue in women with breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy. METHODS: Women with stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM) I to III breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy were randomized to TYP (74 women), STP (68 women), or UC (85 women). Participants in the TYP and STP groups participated in 4 sessions during chemotherapy, followed by 3 booster sessions over the subsequent 6 months, and were encouraged to practice at home. Self-report measures of sleep disturbances (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Brief Fatigue Inventory), and actigraphy were collected at baseline; 1 week after treatment; and at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: There were no group differences noted in total sleep disturbances or fatigue levels over time. However, patients in the TYP group reported fewer daily disturbances 1 week after treatment compared with those in the STP (difference, -0.43; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], -0.82 to -0.04 [P = .03]) and UC (difference, -0.41; 95% CI, -0.77 to -0.05 [P = .02]) groups. Group differences at the other time points were maintained for TYP versus STP. Actigraphy data revealed greater minutes awake after sleep onset for patients in the STP group 1 week after treatment versus those in the TYP (difference, 15.36; 95% CI, 7.25-23.48 [P = .0003]) and UC (difference, 14.48; 95% CI, 7.09-21.87 [P = .0002]) groups. Patients in the TYP group who practiced at least 2 times a week during follow-up reported better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and actigraphy outcomes at 3 months and 6 months after treatment compared with those who did not and better outcomes compared with those in the UC group. CONCLUSIONS: Participating in TYP during chemotherapy resulted in modest short-term benefits in sleep quality, with long-term benefits emerging over time for those who practiced TYP at least 2 times a week. Cancer 2018;124:36-45. © 2017 American Cancer Society.


Asunto(s)
Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/efectos adversos , Neoplasias de la Mama/rehabilitación , Fatiga/rehabilitación , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/rehabilitación , Yoga , Actigrafía , Adulto , Antineoplásicos/efectos adversos , Antineoplásicos/uso terapéutico , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/uso terapéutico , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Neoplasias de la Mama/tratamiento farmacológico , Neoplasias de la Mama/patología , Quimioterapia Adyuvante , Ciclofosfamida/administración & dosificación , Docetaxel , Doxorrubicina/administración & dosificación , Epirrubicina/administración & dosificación , Fatiga/inducido químicamente , Fatiga/etiología , Femenino , Fluorouracilo/administración & dosificación , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Ejercicios de Estiramiento Muscular , Terapia Neoadyuvante , Estadificación de Neoplasias , Sueño , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/inducido químicamente , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/etiología , Taxoides/uso terapéutico , Resultado del Tratamiento
19.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 17(2): 332-336, 2018 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28150503

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Despite their high symptom burden and poor prognosis, evidence-based supportive care interventions for adults with high-grade glioma (HGG) and their caregivers are lacking. Thus, we aimed to establish feasibility of a patient-caregiver dyadic yoga program (DYP) for newly diagnosed HGG patients and their family caregivers targeting quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes. METHOD: In this single-arm pilot trial, dyads participated in a 12-session DYP program across the course of patients' radiotherapy. The intervention focused on breathing exercises, gentle movements, and guided meditations. We tracked feasibility data and assessed levels of cancer-related symptoms (MD Anderson Symptom Inventory [MDASI]), depressive symptoms (Centers for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale), fatigue (Brief Fatigue Inventory), sleep disturbances (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), and overall mental and physical QOL (36-item Short-Form Survey [SF-36]) at baseline and post-DYP, which was at the end of radiotherapy. RESULTS: We approached 6 dyads of which 5 dyads (86%) consented and completed all 12 sessions and pre/post assessments. All patients (mean age: 52 years, 80% female, 80% grade IV) and caregivers (mean age: 58 years, 80% female, 60% spouses) perceived benefit from the program. Paired t tests revealed a marginally significant, yet clinically meaningful, decrease in patient's cancer symptoms ( t = 2.32, P = .08; MDASI mean; pre = 1.75, post = 1.04). There were clinically significant reductions in patient sleep disturbances (PSQI mean: pre = 10.75, post = 8.00) and improvements in patient and caregiver mental QOL (MCS of SF-36 mean: pre = 42.35, post = 52.34, and pre = 45.14, post = 51.43, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This novel supportive care program appears to be safe, feasible, acceptable, and subjectively useful for HGG patients and their caregivers. There was also preliminary evidence regarding QOL treatment gains for both patients and caregivers.


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores/psicología , Glioma/psicología , Glioma/radioterapia , Yoga/psicología , Adaptación Psicológica/fisiología , Adulto , Anciano , Depresión/psicología , Fatiga/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Meditación/psicología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
20.
Support Care Cancer ; 25(12): 3645-3650, 2017 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28660350

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Massage has shown benefit for symptomatic relief in cancer patients and their caregivers. We explored the effects of a single massage session on self-reported symptoms in an outpatient clinic at a comprehensive cancer center. METHODS: Patients and caregivers receiving oncology massage treatments (30 or 60-min duration) at our Integrative Medicine Center outpatient clinic from September 2012 to January 2015 completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS; 0-10 scale, 10 most severe) pre and post massage. ESAS individual items and subscales of physical distress (PHS), psychological distress (PSS), and global distress (GDS) were analyzed. We used paired t tests with a p value correction (i.e., p < .001) to examine symptoms pre/post massage. RESULTS: Initial massage visits for 343 patients and 87 caregivers were analyzed. The highest symptom burdens (means) at baseline for patients were sleep 4.22, fatigue 3.57, and pain 2.94; for caregivers, sleep 3.77, well-being 3.01, and pain 2.59. Although patients reported significantly greater global distress and physical symptoms (p < .0001) compared to caregivers at baseline, groups did not differ in regard to psychological symptom burden (p = .66) and individual symptom scores (e.g., pain, sleep, spiritual pain). Massage therapy was associated with statistically (p < .0001) and clinically significant improvements in symptoms of pain, fatigue, anxiety, well-being, and sleep and ESAS subscales for both patients and caregivers. Greater massage duration (30 vs 60 min) did not lead to greater symptom reduction. CONCLUSIONS: Patients and caregivers reported a moderately high symptom burden. A single massage treatment resulted in acute relief of self-reported symptoms in both groups. Further study is warranted regarding optimal massage dose and frequency.


Asunto(s)
Masaje/psicología , Neoplasias/psicología , Cuidadores , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Masaje/métodos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias/terapia , Medición de Resultados Informados por el Paciente , Autoinforme
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