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1.
Cancer ; 2024 Mar 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38520382

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, ADT causes loss of bone mineral density (BMD) and an increase in fracture risk; effective interventions for ADT-induced bone loss are limited. METHODS: A phase 2 randomized controlled trial investigated the feasibility, safety, and preliminary efficacy of high-dose weekly vitamin D (HDVD, 50,000 IU/week) versus placebo for 24 weeks in patients with prostate cancer receiving ADT, with all subjects receiving 600 IU/day vitamin D and 1000 mg/day calcium. Participants were ≥60 years (mean years, 67.7), had a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level <32 ng/mL, and initiated ADT within the previous 6 months. At baseline and after intervention, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to assess BMD, and levels of bone cell, bone formation, and resorption were measured. RESULTS: The HDVD group (N = 29) lost 1.5% BMD at the total hip vs. 4.1% for the low-dose group (N = 30; p = .03) and 1.7% BMD at the femoral neck vs. 4.4% in the low-dose group (p = .06). Stratified analyses showed that, for those with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D level <27 ng/mL, the HDVD group lost 2.3% BMD at the total hip vs 7.1% for the low-dose group (p < .01). Those in the HDVD arm showed significant changes in parathyroid hormone (p < .01), osteoprotegerin (p < 0.01), N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (p < 0.01) and C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (p < 0.01). No difference in adverse events or toxicity was noted between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: HDVD supplementation significantly reduced hip and femoral neck BMD loss, especially for patients with low baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, although demonstrating safety and feasibility in prostate cancer patients on ADT.

2.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw ; 21(2): 153-162.e2, 2023 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36791754

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) negatively affects survivors' walking, engagement in physical activity (PA), and quality of life (QoL). Yoga is an effective therapy for treating CRF; however, evidence from large clinical trials regarding how reducing CRF through yoga influences CRF's interference with survivors' walking, engagement in PA, and QoL is not available. We examined the effects of yoga and the mediational influence of CRF on CRF's interference with walking, PA, and QoL among cancer survivors in a multicenter phase III randomized controlled trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cancer survivors (n=410) with insomnia 2 to 24 months posttreatment were randomized to a 4-week yoga intervention-Yoga for Cancer Survivors (YOCAS)-or standard care. A symptom inventory was used to assess how much CRF interfered with survivors' walking, PA, and QoL. The Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form was used to assess CRF. Two-tailed t tests and analyses of covariance were used to examine within-group and between-group differences. Path analysis was used to evaluate mediational relationships between CRF and changes in CRF's interference with walking, PA, and QoL among survivors. RESULTS: Compared with standard care controls, YOCAS participants reported significant improvements in CRF's interference with walking, PA, and QoL at postintervention (all effect size = -0.33; all P≤.05). Improvements in CRF resulting from yoga accounted for significant proportions of the improvements in walking (44%), PA (53%), and QoL (45%; all P≤.05). CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion (44%-53%) of the YOCAS effect on CRF's interference with walking, PA, and QoL was due to improvements in CRF among cancer survivors. Yoga should be introduced and included as a treatment option for survivors experiencing fatigue. By reducing fatigue, survivors further improve their walking, engagement in PA, and QoL.


Asunto(s)
Supervivientes de Cáncer , Neoplasias , Yoga , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Ejercicio Físico , Caminata , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia
3.
Cancers (Basel) ; 14(17)2022 Aug 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36077737

RESUMEN

Cancer-related fatigue is a common, burdensome symptom of cancer and a side-effect of chemotherapy. While a Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) promotes energy metabolism and overall health, its effects on cancer-related fatigue remain unknown. In a randomized controlled trial, we evaluated a rigorous MedDiet intervention for feasibility and safety as well as preliminary effects on cancer-related fatigue and metabolism compared to usual care. Participants had stage I−III cancer and at least six weeks of chemotherapy scheduled. After baseline assessments, randomization occurred 2:1, MedDiet:usual care. Measures were collected at baseline, week 4, and week 8 including MedDiet adherence (score 0−14), dietary intake, and blood-based metabolic measures. Mitochondrial respiration from freshly isolated T cells was measured at baseline and four weeks. Participants (n = 33) were 51.0 ± 14.6 years old, 94% were female, and 91% were being treated for breast cancer. The study was feasible, with 100% completing the study and >70% increasing their MedDiet adherence at four and eight weeks compared to baseline. Overall, the MedDiet intervention vs. usual care had a small-moderate effect on change in fatigue at weeks 4 and 8 (ES = 0.31, 0.25, respectively). For those with a baseline MedDiet score <5 (n = 21), the MedDiet intervention had a moderate-large effect of 0.67 and 0.48 at weeks 4 and 8, respectively. The MedDiet did not affect blood-based lipids, though it had a beneficial effect on fructosamine (ES = −0.55). Fatigue was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction including lower basal respiration, maximal respiration, and spare capacity (p < 0.05 for FACIT-F fatigue subscale and BFI, usual fatigue). In conclusion, the MedDiet was feasible and attenuated cancer-related fatigue among patients undergoing chemotherapy, especially those with lower MedDiet scores at baseline.

4.
Nurs Res ; 71(5): 411-417, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35416182

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue is a prevalent, debilitating, and persistent condition. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a putative contributor to cancer-related fatigue, but relationships between mitochondrial function and cancer-related fatigue are not well understood. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relationships between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene expression and cancer-related fatigue, as well as the effects of fish and soybean oil supplementation on these relationships. METHODS: A secondary analysis was performed on data from a randomized controlled trial of breast cancer survivors 4-36 months posttreatment with moderate-severe cancer-related fatigue. Participants were randomized to take 6 g fish oil, 6 g soybean oil, or 3 g each daily for 6 weeks. At pre- and postintervention, participants completed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue questionnaire and provided whole blood for assessment of mtDNA gene expression. The expression of 12 protein-encoding genes was reduced to a single dimension using principal component analysis for use in regression analysis. Relationships between mtDNA expression and cancer-related fatigue were assessed using linear regression. RESULTS: Among 68 participants, cancer-related fatigue improved and expression of all mtDNA genes decreased over 6 weeks with no effect of treatment group on either outcome. Participants with lower baseline mtDNA gene expression had greater improvements in cancer-related fatigue. No significant associations were observed between mtDNA gene expression and cancer-related fatigue at baseline or changes in mtDNA gene expression and changes in cancer-related fatigue. DISCUSSION: Data from this exploratory study add to the growing literature that mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of cancer-related fatigue.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama , Supervivientes de Cáncer , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Neoplasias de la Mama/genética , Neoplasias de la Mama/terapia , ADN Mitocondrial/genética , Fatiga/genética , Fatiga/terapia , Femenino , Expresión Génica , Genes Mitocondriales , Humanos , Aceite de Soja
5.
Nutrients ; 14(1)2021 Dec 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35011059

RESUMEN

Cancer-related fatigue is a prevalent and debilitating condition that persists for years into survivorship. Studies evaluating both fish oil supplementation on fatigue and associations between fish oil consumption and fatigue have shown mixed effects; it is unknown what factors contribute to these differential effects. Herein, we investigate whether the nutritional status of cancer survivors was associated with serum omega-3 concentration or change in serum omega-3s throughout a fish oil supplementation study, and then if any of these factors were associated with fatigue. Breast cancer survivors 4-36 months post-treatment with moderate-severe fatigue were randomized to take 6 g fish oil, 6 g soybean oil, or 3 g of each daily for 6 weeks. Baseline nutritional status was calculated using the Controlling Nutritional Status tool (serum albumin, lymphocytes, cholesterol). At baseline and post-intervention, serum fatty acids were quantified and fatigue was assessed using the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory. Participants (n = 85) were 61.2 ± 9.7 years old with a body mass index of 31.9 ± 6.7 kg/m2; 69% had a good nutritional score and 31% had light-moderate malnutrition. Those with good nutritional status had greater total serum omega-3s at baseline (p = 0.013) and a greater increase in serum omega-3s with supplementation (p = 0.003). Among those who were supplemented with fish oil, greater increases in serum omega-3s were associated with greater improvements in fatigue. In conclusion, good nutritional status may increase uptake of fatty acid supplements, increasing their ability to improve fatigue.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Fatiga/tratamiento farmacológico , Ácidos Grasos/farmacocinética , Aceites de Pescado/administración & dosificación , Estado Nutricional/fisiología , Aceite de Soja/administración & dosificación , Anciano , Índice de Masa Corporal , Neoplasias de la Mama/fisiopatología , Suplementos Dietéticos , Fatiga/etiología , Ácidos Grasos/sangre , Ácidos Grasos Omega-3/sangre , Femenino , Aceites de Pescado/química , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Aceite de Soja/química
6.
Nutr Cancer ; 73(10): 1882-1889, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32911988

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is commonly used to treat patients with advanced prostate cancer but is associated with functional decline. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA)-derived phase angle may reflect frailty and functional decline in cancer patients. High-dose vitamin D supplementation may improve phase angle values and physical function. METHODS: We conducted an exploratory analysis from a phase II randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of high-dose vitamin D supplementation in prostate cancer patients (age ≥ 60 yrs). Fifty-nine patients were randomized to high-dose vitamin D (600 IU/day plus 50,000 IU/week) or low-dose: RDA for vitamin D (600 IU/day plus placebo weekly) for 24 weeks. Phase angle was measured by BIA. Physical function measures included handgrip strength, 6-minute walk test, Short Performance Physical Battery and leg extension. All testing was completed at baseline, week 12 and week 24. RESULTS: Phase angle values were wider over the entire study in the high-dose vitamin D arm indicating healthier muscle cells. The low-dose vitamin D arm had phase angle values consistent with frailty cutoffs in older men (<5.7°). CONCLUSION: Patients in the high-dose vitamin D arm experienced wider phase angle values over the course of the study which may indicate less frailty. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02064946.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Próstata , Vitamina D , Anciano , Antagonistas de Andrógenos , Suplementos Dietéticos , Método Doble Ciego , Fuerza de la Mano , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias de la Próstata/tratamiento farmacológico
7.
Nutr Cancer ; 73(9): 1676-1686, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32812824

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common side effect impacting breast cancer survivors. Research points to a relationship between obesity and CRF in breast cancer survivors related to elevated systemic inflammation and metabolic alterations. METHODS: This cross-sectional study examined the relationship of obesity to CRF, inflammatory markers and serum lipids through a secondary analysis of a nationwide randomized controlled trial. Breast cancer survivors with CRF were categorized based on BMI category. Symptoms of CRF, inflammatory markers and serum fatty acids were assessed among groups. RESULTS: There were 105 breast cancer survivors in the analysis. BMI was positively associated with CRF based on MFSI General (p = 0.020; 95% C.I. 0.024, 0.273) and MFSI Physical (p = 0.013; 95% C.I. 0.035, 0.298) subscales. TNF-α (p = 0.007; 95% C.I. 0.007, 0.044), and IL-6 (p = 0.020; 95% C.I. 0.006, 0.073) were elevated in the obese. Monounsaturated fatty acid levels (p = 0.047; 95% C.I. 0.000, 0.053) and the omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratio were associated with obesity (p = 0.047; 95% C.I. 0.002, 0.322). CONCLUSIONS: Obese breast cancer survivors had greater levels of CRF, inflammatory markers and certain fatty acids. Inflammatory markers and fatty acids were not found to have any mediating or positive association with CRF variables in this analysis. NCT02352779.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama , Supervivientes de Cáncer , Ácidos Grasos Omega-3 , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Estudios Transversales , Fatiga/etiología , Femenino , Humanos , Inflamación/etiología , Obesidad/complicaciones
8.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 18: 1534735419855134, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31165647

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) often co-occurs with sleep disturbance and is one of the most pervasive toxicities resulting from cancer and its treatment. We and other investigators have previously reported that yoga therapy can improve sleep quality in cancer patients and survivors. No nationwide multicenter phase III randomized controlled trial (RCT) has investigated whether yoga therapy improves CRF or whether improvements in sleep mediate the effect of yoga on CRF. We examined the effect of a standardized, 4-week, yoga therapy program (Yoga for Cancer Survivors [YOCAS]) on CRF and whether YOCAS-induced changes in sleep mediated changes in CRF among survivors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Four hundred ten cancer survivors were recruited to a nationwide multicenter phase III RCT comparing the effect of YOCAS to standard survivorship care on CRF and examining the mediating effects of changes in sleep, stemming from yoga, on changes in CRF. CRF was assessed by the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory. Sleep was assessed via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Between- and within-group intervention effects on CRF were assessed by analysis of covariance and 2-tailed t test, respectively. Path analysis was used to evaluate mediation. RESULTS: YOCAS participants demonstrated significantly greater improvements in CRF compared with participants in standard survivorship care at post-intervention ( P < .01). Improvements in overall sleep quality and reductions in daytime dysfunction (eg, excessive napping) resulting from yoga significantly mediated the effect of yoga on CRF (22% and 37%, respectively, both P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: YOCAS is effective for treating CRF among cancer survivors; 22% to 37% of the improvements in CRF from yoga therapy result from improvements in sleep quality and daytime dysfunction. Oncologists should consider prescribing yoga to cancer survivors for treating CRF and sleep disturbance.


Asunto(s)
Supervivientes de Cáncer/psicología , Fatiga/psicología , Meditación/psicología , Neoplasias/psicología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/psicología , Sueño/fisiología , Yoga/psicología , Fatiga/etiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Calidad de Vida
9.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 3(2): pkz005, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31119206

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common side effect of adjuvant therapy and becomes a chronic problem for approximately one-third of survivors. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (O3-PUFA) demonstrated preliminary antifatigue effects in previous research, but have not been investigated in fatigued cancer survivors. METHODS: Breast cancer survivors 4-36 months posttreatment with a CRF score of 4 or more of 10 using the symptom inventory (SI) were randomly assigned to O3-PUFA (fish oil, 6 g/d), omega-6 PUFA (O6-PUFA; soybean oil, 6 g/d), or a low-dose combination of O3-/O6-PUFA (3 g/d O3-PUFA and O6-PUFA) for 6 weeks. CRF was assessed by the SI (screening question), the Brief Fatigue Inventory, and the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Index. Protein and mRNA levels of inflammatory and antioxidant biomarkers, along with fatty acid and lipid levels, were assessed at baseline and week 6. Statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: A total of 108 breast cancer survivors consented; 97 subjects were randomly assigned and 81 completed the trial. The SI CRF score decreased by 2.51 points at week 6 with O6-PUFA and by 0.93 points with O3-PUFA, with statistically significant between-group difference (effect size = -0.86, P < .01). Similar changes were observed for the Brief Fatigue Inventory and Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Index but were not statistically significant. Stratified analyses showed the largest benefit was observed in those with severe baseline CRF (≥7). Compared with O3-PUFA, O6-PUFA supplementation statistically significantly decreased proinflammatory markers in the TNF-α signaling pathway. CONCLUSION: Contrary to our original hypothesis, O6-PUFA statistically significantly reduced CRF compared with O3-PUFA. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and to elucidate mechanisms of action.

10.
Nutr Cancer ; 71(1): 21-40, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30688088

RESUMEN

Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a debilitating syndrome that persists for many cancer survivors for years after treatment. Symptoms include early and persistent fatigue, functional decline, depression, and cognitive difficulties. Inflammation, assessed using pro-inflammatory biomarkers, is increased in cancer survivors with fatigue and treatments for fatigue are often aimed at reducing inflammation. Additionally, cancer and its treatment lead to nutritional complications, changes in body composition, and nutritional deficiencies that potentially weaken the cancer survivor and impact CRF. We conducted a qualitative review of clinical trials that assessed nutritional interventions for preventing and treating CRF. Further studies were examined that used nutritional interventions to address inflammation and fatigue, due to the dearth of nutrition research directly related to CRF. Dietary intake prior to, during, and after cancer treatment appears to affect fatigue levels. Increased protein intake may help preserve lean mass and body composition. Dietary patterns that reduce inflammation, such as the Mediterranean diet and other plant-based diets, appear tolerable to cancer survivors and may reduce fatigue. Supplementation with ginseng, ginger, or probiotics may improve cancer survivors' energy levels. Nutritional interventions, alone or in combination with other interventions should be considered as therapy for fatigue in cancer survivors.


Asunto(s)
Fatiga/terapia , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Terapia Nutricional/métodos , Supervivientes de Cáncer , Ensayos Clínicos como Asunto , Dieta , Suplementos Dietéticos , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Humanos , Micronutrientes/administración & dosificación , Nutrientes/administración & dosificación , Probióticos/administración & dosificación
11.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 38: 822-828, 2018 May 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30231327

RESUMEN

There are 15.5 million cancer survivors in the United States because of, in part, improvements in therapy. As a result, there will be an increased burden of long- and late-term complications of cancer care, such as metabolic alterations. These metabolic changes will include alterations in bone resorption, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus. The majority of cancer treatment-related toxicities have focused on endocrine therapy; however, chemotherapy and supportive medications, such as steroids, contribute to the development of these disorders. Because of the chronicity of these metabolic changes and their impact on morbidity, cancer risk, and outcomes as well other negative effects, including musculoskeletal pain and vasomotor symptoms, alternative strategies must be developed. These strategies should include nonpharmacologic approaches. Here, we summarize metabolic changes secondary to cancer care and integrative approaches to help alleviate therapy-associated toxicities.


Asunto(s)
Terapia Combinada/efectos adversos , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Antagonistas de Andrógenos/efectos adversos , Antagonistas de Andrógenos/uso terapéutico , Antineoplásicos Hormonales/efectos adversos , Antineoplásicos Hormonales/uso terapéutico , Encefalopatías Metabólicas/etiología , Encefalopatías Metabólicas/metabolismo , Encefalopatías Metabólicas/patología , Terapia Combinada/métodos , Prestación Integrada de Atención de Salud , Manejo de la Enfermedad , Glucocorticoides/efectos adversos , Glucocorticoides/uso terapéutico , Humanos , Hipogonadismo/complicaciones , Síndrome Metabólico/etiología , Neoplasias/metabolismo , Neoplasias/terapia , Osteoporosis/etiología
12.
Curr Oncol Rep ; 20(1): 5, 2018 02 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29388071

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To (1) explain what yoga is, (2) summarize published literature on the efficacy of yoga for managing cancer treatment-related toxicities, (3) provide clinical recommendations on the use of yoga for oncology professionals, and (4) suggest promising areas for future research. RECENT FINDINGS: Based on a total of 24 phase II and one phase III clinical trials, low-intensity forms of yoga, specifically gentle hatha and restorative, are feasible, safe, and effective for treating sleep disruption, cancer-related fatigue, cognitive impairment, psychosocial distress, and musculoskeletal symptoms in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation and cancer survivors. Clinicians should consider prescribing yoga for their patients suffering with these toxicities by referring them to qualified yoga professionals. More definitive phase III clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings and to investigate other types, doses, and delivery modes of yoga for treating cancer-related toxicities in patients and survivors.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias/psicología , Neoplasias/terapia , Yoga/psicología , Animales , Ensayos Clínicos Fase I como Asunto , Ensayos Clínicos Fase III como Asunto , Humanos , Sobrevivientes
13.
Support Care Cancer ; 26(8): 2675-2683, 2018 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29470705

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL) is a long-term side effect of breast cancer therapy. Both calcitriol and weight-bearing exercise improve bone metabolism for osteoporotic patients, but are unproven in a breast cancer population. We used a novel high-dose calcitriol regimen with an individualized exercise intervention to improve bone metabolism in breast cancer survivors. METHODS: We accrued 41 subjects to this open label, 2 × 2 factorial, randomized feasibility trial. Breast cancer survivors were randomized to receive the following: (1) calcitriol (45 micrograms/week), (2) individualized exercise with progressive walking and resistance training, (3) both, or (4) a daily multivitamin (control condition) for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes included changes in biomarkers of bone formation, bone resorption, and the bone remodeling index, a composite measure of bone formation and resorption. Safety measures included clinical and biochemical adverse events. A main effect analysis was used for these endpoints. RESULTS: Hypercalcemia was limited to three grade I cases with no grade ≥ 2 cases. Among exercisers, 100% engaged in the prescribed aerobic training and 44.4% engaged in the prescribed resistance training. Calcitriol significantly improved bone formation (Cohen's d = 0.64; p < 0.01), resulting in a non-significant increase in the bone remodeling index (Cohen's d = 0.21; p = 31). Exercise failed to improve any of the bone biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: Both calcitriol and exercise were shown to be feasible and well tolerated. Calcitriol significantly improved bone formation, resulting in a net increase of bone metabolism. Compliance with the exercise intervention was sub-optimal, which may have led to a lack of effect of exercise on bone metabolism.


Asunto(s)
Antineoplásicos Hormonales/uso terapéutico , Enfermedades Óseas Metabólicas/tratamiento farmacológico , Enfermedades Óseas Metabólicas/terapia , Neoplasias de la Mama/terapia , Calcitriol/uso terapéutico , Hormonas y Agentes Reguladores de Calcio/uso terapéutico , Supervivientes de Cáncer/psicología , Ejercicio Físico/fisiología , Adulto , Antineoplásicos Hormonales/farmacología , Enfermedades Óseas Metabólicas/patología , Neoplasias de la Mama/patología , Calcitriol/farmacología , Hormonas y Agentes Reguladores de Calcio/farmacología , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Entrenamiento de Fuerza
14.
Semin Oncol Nurs ; 32(4): 383-393, 2016 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27776835

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To review existing exercise guidelines for cancer patients and survivors for the management of symptom clusters. DATA SOURCES: Review of PubMed literature and published exercise guidelines. CONCLUSION: Cancer and its treatments are responsible for a copious number of incapacitating symptoms that markedly impair quality of life. The exercise oncology literature provides consistent support for the safety and efficacy of exercise interventions in managing cancer- and treatment-related symptoms, as well as improving quality of life in cancer patients and survivors. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Effective management of symptoms enhances recovery, resumption of normal life activities and quality of life for patients and survivors. Exercise is a safe, appropriate, and effective therapeutic option before, during, and after the completion of treatment for alleviating symptoms and symptom clusters.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico , Neoplasias/enfermería , Calidad de Vida , Humanos , Sobrevivientes , Evaluación de Síntomas
15.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 15(3): 263-71, 2016 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26621521

RESUMEN

UNLABELLED: Background Interventions are needed to alleviate memory difficulty in cancer survivors. We previously showed in a phase III randomized clinical trial that YOCAS©® yoga-a program that consists of breathing exercises, postures, and meditation-significantly improved sleep quality in cancer survivors. This study assessed the effects of YOCAS©® on memory and identified relationships between memory and sleep. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Survivors were randomized to standard care (SC) or SC with YOCAS©® . 328 participants who provided data on the memory difficulty item of the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory are included. Sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. General linear modeling (GLM) determined the group effect of YOCAS©® on memory difficulty compared with SC. GLM also determined moderation of baseline memory difficulty on postintervention sleep and vice versa. Path modeling assessed the mediating effects of changes in memory difficulty on YOCAS©® changes in sleep and vice versa. RESULTS: YOCAS©® significantly reduced memory difficulty at postintervention compared with SC (mean change: yoga=-0.60; SC=-0.16; P<.05). Baseline memory difficulty did not moderate the effects of postintervention sleep quality in YOCAS©® compared with SC. Baseline sleep quality did moderate the effects of postintervention memory difficulty in YOCAS©® compared with SC (P<.05). Changes in sleep quality was a significant mediator of reduced memory difficulty in YOCAS©® compared with SC (P<.05); however, changes in memory difficulty did not significantly mediate improved sleep quality in YOCAS©® compared with SC. CONCLUSIONS: In this large nationwide trial, YOCAS©® yoga significantly reduced patient-reported memory difficulty in cancer survivors.


Asunto(s)
Memoria/fisiología , Neoplasias/fisiopatología , Neoplasias/psicología , Sueño/fisiología , Sobrevivientes/psicología , Yoga/psicología , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Meditación/psicología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Autoinforme
16.
Clin Transl Med ; 4: 4, 2015.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25852820

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Fatigue is common in cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. To further understand the mechanism of fatigue and search for potential biomarkers, we conducted this prospective study. Methods We enrolled breast cancer (BC) patients before their first adjuvant Adriamycin-based chemotherapy cycle. Patients responded to the brief fatigue inventory (BFI) and Chalder fatigue questionnaires and had their blood drawn for both plasma evaluation and evaluation of the peripheral mononuclear cell fraction (PMNCF) mRNA expression of various biomarkers. We evaluated FSH, LH, estradiol, DHEA, DHEAS, IL6, IL2, ILIRA, IL1ß, CRP, Cortisol in the plasma and IL2, IL10, IL6, TGF-ß, KLRC1, TNF, BTP, SNCA, SOD1, BLNK, PTGS2 and INF γ expression in the PMNCF. RESULTS: 11 patients did not exhibit an increase in their BFI scores and served as controls, whereas 32 patients exhibited an increase in their BFI scores compared with the baseline scores. From the biomarkers we evaluated in the PMNCF, the only one significantly associated with fatigue was TGF-ß (p = 0.0343), while there was a trend towards significance with KLRC1 (p = 0.0627). We observed no evidence of significant associations of any plasma biomarkers with the development of fatigue. However when we analyzed patients with more severe fatigue, plasma IL1-RA levels correlated directly with higher fatigue scores (p = 0.0136). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that fatigue induced by chemotherapy in BC patients is associated with changes in IL1-ra plasma levels and in TGF-ß lymphocyte expression. Its mechanism may be different than that observed in long-term BC survivors or that induced by radiation therapy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02041364 [ClinicalTrials.gov].

17.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 150(3): 597-604, 2015 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25814054

RESUMEN

Up to 50% of breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitor therapy report musculoskeletal symptoms such as joint and muscle pain, significantly impacting treatment adherence and discontinuation rates. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a nationwide, multi-site, phase II/III randomized, controlled, clinical trial examining the efficacy of yoga for improving musculoskeletal symptoms among breast cancer survivors currently receiving hormone therapy (aromatase inhibitors [AI] or tamoxifen [TAM]). Breast cancer survivors currently receiving AI (N = 95) or TAM (N = 72) with no participation in yoga during the previous 3 months were randomized into 2 arms: (1) standard care monitoring and (2) standard care plus the 4-week yoga intervention (2x/week; 75 min/session) and included in this analysis. The yoga intervention utilized the UR Yoga for Cancer Survivors (YOCAS©(®)) program consisting of breathing exercises, 18 gentle Hatha and restorative yoga postures, and meditation. Musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed pre- and post-intervention. At baseline, AI users reported higher levels of general pain, muscle aches, and total physical discomfort than TAM users (all P ≤ 0.05). Among all breast cancer survivors on hormonal therapy, participants in the yoga group demonstrated greater reductions in musculoskeletal symptoms such as general pain, muscle aches and total physical discomfort from pre- to post-intervention than the control group (all P ≤ 0.05). The severity of musculoskeletal symptoms was higher for AI users compared to TAM users. Among breast cancer survivors on hormone therapy, the brief community-based YOCAS©® intervention significantly reduced general pain, muscle aches, and physical discomfort.


Asunto(s)
Inhibidores de la Aromatasa/efectos adversos , Neoplasias de la Mama/tratamiento farmacológico , Enfermedades Musculoesqueléticas/terapia , Tamoxifeno/efectos adversos , Yoga , Inhibidores de la Aromatasa/uso terapéutico , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Ensayos Clínicos como Asunto , Femenino , Humanos , Estado de Ejecución de Karnofsky , Persona de Mediana Edad , Enfermedades Musculoesqueléticas/inducido químicamente , Sobrevivientes , Tamoxifeno/uso terapéutico
18.
J Geriatr Oncol ; 6(1): 8-14, 2015 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25449185

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Sixty percent of cancer survivors are 65years of age or older. Cancer and its treatments lead to cancer-related fatigue and many other side effects, in turn, creating substantial global side-effect burden (total burden from all side effects) which, ultimately, compromises functional independence and quality of life. Various modes of exercise, such as yoga, reduce cancer-related fatigue and global side-effect burden in younger cancer survivors, but no studies have specifically examined the effects of yoga on older cancer survivors. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 4-week yoga intervention (Yoga for Cancer Survivors: YOCAS©®) on overall cancer-related fatigue, and due to its multidimensional nature, the subdomains of cancer-related fatigue (general, physical, emotional, and mental) and global side-effect burden in older cancer survivors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis on data from a multicenter phase III randomized controlled clinical trial with 2 arms (standard care and standard care plus a 4-week YOCAS©® intervention). The sample for this secondary analysis was 97 older cancer survivors (≥60years of age), between 2months and 2years post-treatment, who participated in the original trial. RESULTS: Participants in the YOCAS©® intervention arm reported significantly lower cancer-related fatigue, physical fatigue, mental fatigue, and global side-effect burden than participants in the standard care arm following the 4-week intervention period (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: YOCAS©® is an effective standardized yoga intervention for reducing cancer-related fatigue, physical fatigue, mental fatigue, and global side-effect burden among older cancer survivors.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Fatiga/rehabilitación , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Yoga , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Fatiga/etiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Resultado del Tratamiento
19.
Explore (NY) ; 10(4): 241-7, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25037667

RESUMEN

CONTEXT: Hot flashes (HF) are a common distressing symptom in women with breast cancer (BC). Current pharmacologic options are moderately effective and are associated with bothersome side effects. Complementary and alternative medicine is commonly used by cancer patients. However, information on the association of hot flashes severity with such use and self-rated health is lacking. OBJECTIVE: To examine the hot flashes severity in women with breast cancer and its association with complementary and alternative medicine use and self-rated health (SRH). DESIGN: Longitudinal multicenter study to assess information needs of cancer outpatients. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with a diagnosis of breast cancer who were scheduled to undergo chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. OUTCOME MEASURES: Hot flashes severity (0 = not present and 10 = as bad as you can imagine), use of complementary and alternative medicine (yes/no), and self-rating of health (SRH) status post-treatment and six-months thereafter (1-5, higher score = better SRH). RESULTS: The majority of women with HF (mean age = 54.4 years) were Caucasian and married, with higher education, and 93% had received surgical treatment for BC. At the end of treatment, 79% women reported experiencing HF [mean severity = 5.87, standard deviation (SD) = 2.9]; significantly more severe HF were reported by younger women with poor SRH, poor performance status, and those reporting doing spiritual practices. At follow-up, 73% had HF (mean severity = 4.86, SD = 3.0), and more severe HF were reported by younger women with poor self-rated health who had undergone chemotherapy plus radiotherapy, used vitamins, and did not exercise. CONCLUSIONS: A high percentage of women experienced hot flashes at the end of treatment and at six-month follow-up. A significant association of hot flashes severity with spiritual practice, increased vitamin use, and reduced exercise emphasize the need for future studies to confirm the results. This can facilitate safe use of complementary and alternative medicine and favorable outcomes while managing cancer-related hot flashes.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama , Terapias Complementarias , Salud , Sofocos/terapia , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Neoplasias de la Mama/terapia , Terapias Complementarias/estadística & datos numéricos , Ejercicio Físico , Femenino , Sofocos/epidemiología , Sofocos/etiología , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Persona de Mediana Edad , Prevalencia , Conducta Sedentaria , Terapias Espirituales , Sobrevivientes , Vitaminas
20.
Oncol Hematol Rev ; 10(2): 164-168, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25861453

RESUMEN

Up to 90% of cancer patients report symptoms of insomnia during and after treatment. Symptoms of insomnia include excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia symptoms are among the most prevalent, distressing and persistent cancer- and cancer treatment-related toxicities reported by patients, and can be severe enough to increase cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia symptoms, they are under-screened, under-diagnosed, and under-treated in cancer patients. When insomnia symptoms are identified, providers are hesitant to prescribe, and patients are hesitant to take pharmaceuticals due to polypharmacy concerns. In addition, sleep medications do not cure insomnia. Yoga is a well-tolerated mode of exercise with promising evidence for its efficacy in improving insomnia symptoms among cancer patients. This article reviews existing clinical research on the effectiveness of yoga for treating insomnia among cancer patients. The article also provides clinical recommendations for prescribing yoga for the treatment of insomnia in this population.

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