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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 19023, 2022 11 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36348045

RESUMEN

This pilot randomized controlled trial investigated massage therapy for symptomatic relief of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) to determine the ideal weekly frequency and number of weeks of providing massage. We evaluated the feasibility and initial efficacy of a Swedish massage protocol to treat lower extremity (LE) CIPN. Inclusion criteria: LE neuropathy attributed to oxaliplatin, paclitaxel, or docetaxel, with no other attributable causes; ≥ 6 months since last chemotherapy; self-reported neuropathy score ≥ 3, 0-10 scale; age ≥ 18. Participant randomization (2:2:1:1) to one of four groups: LE (2) or head/neck/shoulder (control; 1) massage 3 times (3X) a week for 4 weeks; LE (2) or control (1) massage 2X/week for 6 weeks. Completion rate and the Pain Quality Assessment Scale (PQAS) was measured at baseline and 10 weeks later. 71 patients participated: 77.5% women; 57.7% (breast cancer), and 42.3% (GI cancer); mean age 60.3 y/o (range: 40-77); average > 3 years since last chemotherapy. Massage was deemed feasible: mean completion rates (max = 12) were 8.9 (SD 4.2) for 3X/week and 9.8 (SD 4.0) for 2X/week with no statistically significant differences. There were no statistically significant treatment group interactions in PQAS scores at 10-weeks follow-up. There was a statistically significant treatment schedule main effect for PQAS subscales (p < 0.05) at 10 weeks, with lower CIPN symptoms for 3X/week groups versus 2X/week groups. Improvements considered clinically significant favored the LE 3X/week group. Completion rates met pre-defined feasibility criteria. We seemed to observe better outcomes (CIPN symptom reduction) with the more intensive (3X/week for 4 weeks) massage intervention with no differences in adherence, regardless of whether the massage was directly to the CIPN-affected area or not. However, there was some suggestion that the massage program targeting the CIPN-affected area directly provided 3X a week for 4 weeks resulted in the best outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Antineoplásicos , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico , Humanos , Femenino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Masculino , Proyectos Piloto , Calidad de Vida , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/inducido químicamente , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/terapia , Masaje , Antineoplásicos/efectos adversos
2.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 21: 15347354221101630, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35603438

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: A prior phase III, multicenter (United States and China), clinical trial found true acupuncture (TA) resulted in lower xerostomia scores 12 months after radiotherapy than that of a standard care control group. This small pilot study examined brain function changes comparing TA to sham acupuncture (SA) in US and Fudan patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy. METHODS: To determine cerebral activity during TA versus SA acupuncture, patients underwent electroencephalogram evaluation (EEG) immediately prior, during and after both conditions. Acupuncture occurred during weeks 3 to 5 of radiotherapy, with patients receiving either TA or SA, followed 2 to 3 days later by the other treatment in a counterbalanced manner. RESULTS: In the TA minus SA condition (N = 14 Fudan; N = 13 US), most changes were in the delta (0.5-3.5 Hz) and alpha (8-12 Hz) bandwidths. Delta was present in the frontal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus. Alpha was present in the anterior and posterior cingulate, lingual gyrus, amygdala, precuneus, medial frontal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, and superior frontal gyrus. Maximal cortical differences in the Fudan cohort between TA and SA were in areas previously shown to be associated with (TA). In the US cohort, maximal differences between TA and SA were associated with areas which are usually decreased in TA conditions. CONCLUSIONS: There were distinct differences in brain function between those receiving TA and SA and there were clear differences between cultures, helping to explain the lack of placebo effect in the Fudan participants and strong placebo effect in the US patients.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello , Xerostomía , Terapia por Acupuntura/métodos , Encéfalo , Comparación Transcultural , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/radioterapia , Humanos , Proyectos Piloto , Xerostomía/etiología , Xerostomía/terapia
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(12): e1916910, 2019 12 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31808921

RESUMEN

Importance: Radiation-induced xerostomia (RIX) is a common, often debilitating, adverse effect of radiation therapy among patients with head and neck cancer. Quality of life can be severely affected, and current treatments have limited benefit. Objective: To determine if acupuncture can prevent RIX in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiation therapy. Design, Setting, and Participants: This 2-center, phase 3, randomized clinical trial compared a standard care control (SCC) with true acupuncture (TA) and sham acupuncture (SA) among patients with oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal carcinoma who were undergoing radiation therapy in comprehensive cancer centers in the United States and China. Patients were enrolled between December 16, 2011, and July 7, 2015. Final follow-up was August 15, 2016. Analyses were conducted February 1 through 28, 2019. Intervention: Either TA or SA using a validated acupuncture placebo device was performed 3 times per week during a 6- to 7-week course of radiation therapy. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was RIX, as determined by the Xerostomia Questionnaire in which a higher score indicates worse RIX, for combined institutions 1 year after radiation therapy ended. Secondary outcomes included incidence of clinically significant xerostomia (score >30), salivary flow, quality of life, salivary constituents, and role of baseline expectancy related to acupuncture on outcomes. Results: Of 399 patients randomized, 339 were included in the final analysis (mean [SD] age, 51.3 [11.7] years; age range, 21-79 years; 258 [77.6%] men), including 112 patients in the TA group, 115 patients in the SA group, and 112 patients in the SCC group. For the primary aim, the adjusted least square mean (SD) xerostomia score in the TA group (26.6 [17.7]) was significantly lower than in the SCC group (34.8 [18.7]) (P = .001; effect size = -0.44) and marginally lower but not statistically significant different from the SA group (31.3 [18.6]) (P = .06; effect size = -0.26). Incidence of clinically significant xerostomia 1 year after radiation therapy ended followed a similar pattern, with 38 patients in the TA group (34.6%), 54 patients in the SA group (47.8%), and 60 patients in the SCC group (55.1%) experiencing clinically significant xerostomia (P = .009). Post hoc comparisons revealed a significant difference between the TA and SCC groups at both institutions, but TA was significantly different from SA only at Fudan University Cancer Center, Shanghai, China (estimated difference [SE]: TA vs SCC, -9.9 [2.5]; P < .001; SA vs SCC, -1.7 [2.5]; P = .50; TA vs SA, -8.2 [2.5]; P = .001), and SA was significantly different from SCC only at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (estimated difference [SE]: TA vs SCC, -8.1 [3.4]; P = .016; SA vs SCC, -10.5 [3.3]; P = .002; TA vs SA, 2.4 [3.2]; P = .45). Conclusions and Relevance: This randomized clinical trial found that TA resulted in significantly fewer and less severe RIX symptoms 1 year after treatment vs SCC. However, further studies are needed to confirm clinical relevance and generalizability of this finding and to evaluate inconsistencies in response to sham acupuncture between patients in the United States and China. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01266044.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Acupuntura/métodos , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/radioterapia , Traumatismos por Radiación/terapia , Xerostomía/terapia , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Calidad de Vida , Traumatismos por Radiación/etiología , Resultado del Tratamiento , Xerostomía/etiología , Adulto Joven
4.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 16(5): 691-699, 2019 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30322793

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Stereotactic breast biopsy (SBB) is a common, anxiety-producing procedure. Nonpharmacologic methods to manage acute anxiety are needed. METHODS: In this single-blind trial, women were recruited before SBB and randomized in a 2:2:1 ratio to a single session of guided mindfulness-based meditation (GM; n = 30), focused breathing (FB; n = 30), or standard care (SC; n = 16). Anxiety and pain were assessed at baseline after a 10-min prebiopsy group-specific activity (GM, FB, or SC), every 4 min during SBB, and after biopsy. Electroencephalographic activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus was collected throughout the study. RESULTS: Women in the GM group reported a steeper reduction in anxiety than women in the FB and SC groups (P < .001 for all, Cohen's d > 0.4 for all). There were no group differences in pain ratings during the biopsy. Women in the GM group experienced increased beta activity during biopsy in the insula (P = .006, Cohen's d = 1.4) and anterior cingulate cortex (P = .019, Cohen's d = 1.0) compared with women in the SC group, and there was a trend toward the same effect compared with women in the FB group (P < .10 for both). Women in the GM and FB groups experienced a nonsignificant decrease in delta activity in the precuneus during biopsy compared with those in the SC group (P < .40 for both, Cohen's d > 0.6 for both), which was associated with a steeper reduction in anxiety during the biopsy (r = 0.51, P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Brief, guided meditation may provide effective anxiety relief during an acute medical procedure and affect neuronal activity in regions associated with attention, self-awareness, and emotion regulation.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/prevención & control , Biopsia con Aguja Gruesa/psicología , Neoplasias de la Mama/patología , Meditación , Atención Plena , Electroencefalografía , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Dimensión del Dolor , Método Simple Ciego
5.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 55(5): 1276-1285, 2018 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29421164

RESUMEN

CONTEXT: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer treatment and may adversely affect quality of life (QOL) for years. OBJECTIVES: We explored the long-term effects of electroencephalographic neurofeedback (NFB) as a treatment for CIPN and other aspects of QOL. METHODS: Seventy-one cancer survivors (mean age 62.5; 87% females) with CIPN were randomized to NFB or to a waitlist control (WLC) group. The NFB group underwent 20 sessions of NFB where rewards were given for voluntary changes in electroencephalography. Measurements of pain, cancer-related symptoms, QOL, sleep, and fatigue were obtained at baseline, end of treatment, and one and four months later. RESULTS: Seventy one participants enrolled in the study. At the end of treatment, 30 in the NFB group and 32 in the WLC group completed assessments; at four months, 23 in the NFB group and 28 in the WLC completed assessments. Linear mixed model analysis revealed significant group × time interaction for pain severity. A general linear model determined that the NFB group had greater improvements in worst pain (primary outcome) and other symptoms such as numbness, cancer-related symptom severity, symptom interference, physical functioning, general health, and fatigue compared with the WLC group at the end of treatment and four months (all P < 0.05). Effect sizes were moderate or large for most measures. CONCLUSION: NFB appears to result in long-term reduction in multiple CIPN symptoms and improved postchemotherapy QOL and fatigue.


Asunto(s)
Antineoplásicos/efectos adversos , Neurorretroalimentación , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/etiología , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/terapia , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Antineoplásicos/uso terapéutico , Encéfalo/fisiopatología , Supervivientes de Cáncer/psicología , Costo de Enfermedad , Electroencefalografía , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias/tratamiento farmacológico , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/fisiopatología , Calidad de Vida , Resultado del Tratamiento
6.
Cancer ; 123(11): 1989-1997, 2017 06 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28257146

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a significant problem for cancer patients, and there are limited treatment options for this often debilitating condition. Neuromodulatory interventions could be a novel modality for patients trying to manage CIPN symptoms; however, they are not yet the standard of care. This study examined whether electroencephalogram (EEG) neurofeedback (NFB) could alleviate CIPN symptoms in survivors. METHODS: This was a randomized controlled trial with survivors assigned to an NFB group or a wait-list control (WLC) group. The NFB group underwent 20 sessions of NFB, in which visual and auditory rewards were given for voluntary changes in EEGs. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) worst-pain item was the primary outcome. The BPI, the Pain Quality Assessment Scale, and EEGs were collected before NFB and again after treatment. Outcomes were assessed with general linear modeling. RESULTS: Cancer survivors with CIPN (average duration of symptoms, 25.3 mo), who were mostly female and had a mean age of 62.5 years, were recruited between April 2011 and September 2014. One hundred percent of the participants starting the NFB program completed it (30 in the NFB group and 32 in the WLC group). The NFB group demonstrated greater improvement than the controls on the BPI worst-pain item (mean change score, -2.43 [95% confidence interval, -3.58 to -1.28] vs 0.09 [95% confidence interval, -0.72 to -0.90]; P =·.001; effect size, 0.83). CONCLUSIONS: NFB appears to be effective at reducing CIPN symptoms. There was evidence of neurological changes in the cortical location and in the bandwidth targeted by the intervention, and changes in EEG activity were predictive of symptom reduction. Cancer 2017;123:1989-1997. © 2017 American Cancer Society.


Asunto(s)
Antineoplásicos/efectos adversos , Neoplasias/tratamiento farmacológico , Neurorretroalimentación/métodos , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/terapia , Sobrevivientes , Anciano , Neoplasias de la Mama/tratamiento farmacológico , Femenino , Neoplasias Gastrointestinales/tratamiento farmacológico , Neoplasias de los Genitales Femeninos/tratamiento farmacológico , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Compuestos Organoplatinos/efectos adversos , Oxaliplatino , Paclitaxel/efectos adversos , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso Periférico/inducido químicamente , Proyectos Piloto , Compuestos de Platino/efectos adversos , Taxoides/efectos adversos , Factores de Tiempo , Resultado del Tratamiento , Listas de Espera
7.
Psychooncology ; 26(11): 1936-1943, 2017 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27548839

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Sleep disturbances and fatigue are common in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Prior research suggests mind-body techniques may improve these outcomes. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of qigong/tai chi (QGTC) in men with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy. METHODS: Men with prostate cancer starting definitive radiation were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: (1) QGTC; (2) light exercise (LE); or (3) waiting list control. Sleep disturbances (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and fatigue (Brief Fatigue Inventory) were assessed at baseline, midway through radiotherapy (T2), during the last week of radiotherapy (T3), and at 1 (T4) and 3 months (T5) after the end of radiotherapy. Patients in the QGTC and LE groups attended three 40-minute classes per week throughout radiotherapy. RESULTS: Ninety patients were randomized to the 3 groups (QGTC = 26; LE = 26; waiting list control = 24). The QGTC group reported longer sleep duration midway through radiotherapy (QGTC = 7.01 h; LE = 6.42; WL = 6.50; P = .05), but this difference did not persist over time. There were no group differences in other domains of sleep or fatigue. Exploratory analyses conducted to examine the effect of health-related quality of life (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite and American Urological Association Symptom score) on sleep and fatigue showed significant correlations across multiple domains. CONCLUSIONS: Qigong/tai chi during radiation for prostate cancer resulted in superior sleep duration midway through radiation, but this effect was not durable, and there were no differences in other domains of sleep or fatigue. Exploratory analysis demonstrated that both sleep and fatigue were highly correlated with prostate cancer-related physical symptoms. Future mind-body intervention studies should incorporate multimodal therapy focused on improving physical symptoms in this population.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico , Fatiga/terapia , Neoplasias de la Próstata/radioterapia , Qigong , Calidad de Vida , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/terapia , Taichi Chuan , Listas de Espera , Anciano , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud , Neoplasias de la Próstata/psicología , Sueño , Texas
8.
Curr Oncol Rep ; 16(12): 417, 2014 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25325936

RESUMEN

Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network states that all patients be screened with the single-item distress thermometer and to also indicate the source of distress and to get appropriate referral. In addition to the many conventional approaches for managing distress from the fields of psychology and psychiatry, many patients are seeking strategies to manage their distress that are outside conventional medicine such as mind-body techniques. Mind-body techniques such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, and qigong have been found to lower distress and lead to improvements in different aspects of quality of life. It is essential that the standard of care in oncology include distress screening and the delivery of different techniques to help patients manage the psychosocial challenges of diagnosis and treatment of cancer.


Asunto(s)
Meditación , Neoplasias/psicología , Qigong , Calidad de Vida , Estrés Psicológico/terapia , Taichi Chuan , Yoga , Adaptación Psicológica , Medicina Basada en la Evidencia , Humanos , Estrés Psicológico/etiología , Resultado del Tratamiento
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24527052

RESUMEN

Objectives. This study examines the short- and long-term QOL benefits of a music therapy intervention for patients recovering from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods. Ninety allogeneic HSCT patients, after transplant, were randomized to receive ISO-principle (i.e., mood matching) based music therapy (MT; n = 29), unstructured music (UM; n = 30), or usual care (UC; n = 31) for four weeks. The ISO principle posits that patients may shift their mood from one state to another by listening to music that is "equal to" the individual's initial mood state and subsequently listening to music selections that gradually shift in tempo and mood to match the patient's desired disposition. Participants in MT and UM groups developed two audio CDs to help them feel more relaxed and energized and were instructed to use the CDs to improve their mood as needed. Short-term effects on mood and long-term effects on QOL were examined. Results. MT and UM participants reported improved mood immediately after listening to CDs; the within-group effect was greater for UM participants compared to MT participants. Participant group was not associated with long-term QOL outcomes. Conclusions. Music listening improves mood acutely but was not associated with long-term benefits in this study.

10.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 13(1): 30-7, 2014 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23439659

RESUMEN

Managing cancer-related chronic pain is challenging to health care professionals as well as cancer patients and survivors. The management of cancer-related pain has largely consisted of pharmacological treatments, which has caused researchers to focus on neurotransmitter activity as a mediator of patients' perception of pain rather than the electrical activity during neurobiological processes of cancer-related pain. Consequently, brain-based pain treatment has focused mainly on neurotransmitters and not electrical neuromodulation. Neuroimaging research has revealed that brain activity is associated with patients' perceptions of symptoms across various diagnoses. The brain modulates internally generated neural activity and adjusts perceptions according to sensory input from the peripheral nervous system. Cancer-related pain may result not only from changes in the peripheral nervous system but also from changes in cortical activity over time. Thus, cortical reorganization by way of the brain's natural, plastic ability (neuroplasticity) may be used to manage pain symptoms. Physical and psychological distress could be modulated by giving patients tools to regulate neural activity in symptom-specific regions of interest. Initial research in nononcology populations suggests that encouraging neuroplasticity through a learning paradigm can be a useful technique to help treat chronic pain. Here we review evidence that indicates a measurable link between brain activity and patient-reported psychological and physical distress. We also summarize findings regarding both the neuroelectrical and neuroanatomical experience of symptoms, review research examining the mechanisms of the brain's ability to modify its own activity, and propose a brain-computer interface as a learning paradigm to augment neuroplasticity for pain management.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias/complicaciones , Neoplasias/terapia , Neurotransmisores/uso terapéutico , Dolor/tratamiento farmacológico , Dolor/etiología , Encéfalo/fisiología , Fenómenos Electrofisiológicos , Humanos , Plasticidad Neuronal , Manejo del Dolor/métodos
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