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1.
Psychol Trauma ; 2022 Mar 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35357878

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Potentially morally injurious events (PMIEs) are events that contradict one's own personal ethics and may promote a deep sense of violation, leading to psychological distress. Individuals with greater trait gratitude and mindfulness may be less likely to perceive events as being morally injurious and may, in turn, be less likely to experience subsequent distress. The current study seeks to examine (a) PMIE rates in a multioccupational first responder sample and (b) the indirect effect of trait gratitude and mindfulness on psychological distress via fewer perceived PMIEs. METHOD: 293 first responders from agencies/departments within southeastern Texas (in-person) and nationwide (online) completed a survey assessing PMIEs, PTSD symptoms (PCL-C), anxiety (GAD-7), depression (PHQ-8), gratitude (GRAT-S), and mindfulness (MAAS). RESULTS: PMIEs were common (61% witnessed a transgression; 21% committed a transgression; 40% felt betrayed by others). Gratitude was indirectly associated with fewer PTSD [-.09, 95% CI (-.13, -.05)], anxiety [-.03, 95% CI (-.04, -.01)], and depression [-.03, 95% CI (-.05, -.01)] symptoms via lower PMIEs. Similarly, mindfulness was indirectly associated with fewer PTSD [-.92, 95% CI (-1.55, -.38)], anxiety [-.20, 95% CI (-.42, .02)], and depression [-.26, 95% CI (-.48, -.06)] symptoms via lower PMIEs. CONCLUSIONS: PMIEs were common in this first responder sample and associated with increased distress. Trait gratitude and mindfulness may protect first responders from perceiving events as morally injurious, which may lead to improved mental health. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).

2.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(5): 4477-4484, 2022 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35107599

RESUMEN

This study examined self-reported and actigraphy-assessed sleep and depression as moderators of the effect of a Tibetan yoga intervention on sleep and depression among women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer. This is a secondary analysis of an RCT examining a 4-session Tibetan yoga program (TYP; n = 74) versus stretching program (STP; n = 68) or usual care (UC; n = 85) on self-reported sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), actigraphy-assessed sleep efficiency (SE)) and depression (Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale; CES-D) for women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer. Data were collected at baseline and 1-week and 3-month post-intervention. Baseline PSQI, actigraphy-SE, and CES-D were examined as moderators of the effect of group on PSQI, actigraphy-SE, and CES-D 1 week and 3 months after treatment. There was a significant baseline actigraphy-SE × group effect on PSQI at 1 week (p < .001) and 3 months (p = .002) and on CES-D at 3 months (p = .049). Specifically, the negative association of baseline actigraphy-SE with subsequent PSQI and CES-D was buffered for women in the TYP and, to a lesser extent in STP, compared to those in the UC. Baseline PSQI and CES-D were not significant moderators of the effect of group on any outcome. Behaviorally assessed sleep may be a more robust indicator of which patients are most appropriate for a yoga intervention than self-reported sleep quality. Women with poor sleep efficiency may derive the greatest benefit in terms of sleep quality and mood from a yoga intervention.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama , Meditación , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia , Yoga , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Neoplasias de la Mama/tratamiento farmacológico , Femenino , Humanos , Sueño , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Tibet
3.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 16(5): 691-699, 2019 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30322793

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Stereotactic breast biopsy (SBB) is a common, anxiety-producing procedure. Nonpharmacologic methods to manage acute anxiety are needed. METHODS: In this single-blind trial, women were recruited before SBB and randomized in a 2:2:1 ratio to a single session of guided mindfulness-based meditation (GM; n = 30), focused breathing (FB; n = 30), or standard care (SC; n = 16). Anxiety and pain were assessed at baseline after a 10-min prebiopsy group-specific activity (GM, FB, or SC), every 4 min during SBB, and after biopsy. Electroencephalographic activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus was collected throughout the study. RESULTS: Women in the GM group reported a steeper reduction in anxiety than women in the FB and SC groups (P < .001 for all, Cohen's d > 0.4 for all). There were no group differences in pain ratings during the biopsy. Women in the GM group experienced increased beta activity during biopsy in the insula (P = .006, Cohen's d = 1.4) and anterior cingulate cortex (P = .019, Cohen's d = 1.0) compared with women in the SC group, and there was a trend toward the same effect compared with women in the FB group (P < .10 for both). Women in the GM and FB groups experienced a nonsignificant decrease in delta activity in the precuneus during biopsy compared with those in the SC group (P < .40 for both, Cohen's d > 0.6 for both), which was associated with a steeper reduction in anxiety during the biopsy (r = 0.51, P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Brief, guided meditation may provide effective anxiety relief during an acute medical procedure and affect neuronal activity in regions associated with attention, self-awareness, and emotion regulation.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/prevención & control , Biopsia con Aguja Gruesa/psicología , Neoplasias de la Mama/patología , Meditación , Atención Plena , Electroencefalografía , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Dimensión del Dolor , Método Simple Ciego
4.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 15(3): 250-62, 2016 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26867802

RESUMEN

Hypothesis This study examines moderators and mediators of a yoga intervention targeting quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with breast cancer receiving radiotherapy.Methods Women undergoing 6 weeks of radiotherapy were randomized to a yoga (YG; n = 53) or stretching (ST; n = 56) intervention or a waitlist control group (WL; n = 54). Depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances were measured at baseline. Mediator (posttraumatic stress symptoms, benefit finding, and cortisol slope) and outcome (36-item Short Form [SF]-36 mental and physical component scales [MCS and PCS]) variables were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and 1-, 3-, and 6-months posttreatment. Results Baseline depressive symptoms (P = .03) and sleep disturbances (P < .01) moderated the Group × Time effect on MCS, but not PCS. Women with high baseline depressive symptoms in YG reported marginally higher 3-month MCS than their counterparts in WL (P = .11). Women with high baseline sleep disturbances in YG reported higher 3-months MCS than their counterparts in WL (P < .01) and higher 6-month MCS than their counterparts in ST (P = .01). YG led to greater benefit finding than ST and WL across the follow-up (P = .01). Three-month benefit finding partially mediated the effect of YG on 6-month PCS. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and cortisol slope did not mediate treatment effect on QOL. Conclusion Yoga may provide the greatest mental-health-related QOL benefits for those experiencing pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms. Yoga may improve physical-health-related QOL by increasing ability to find benefit in the cancer experience.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama/psicología , Neoplasias de la Mama/radioterapia , Meditación/psicología , Yoga/psicología , Neoplasias de la Mama/metabolismo , Depresión/metabolismo , Depresión/psicología , Fatiga/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Hidrocortisona/metabolismo , Persona de Mediana Edad , Calidad de Vida , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/metabolismo , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/psicología
5.
Psychooncology ; 24(8): 910-8, 2015 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25146413

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This multi-site randomized trial evaluates the quality of life (QOL) benefits of an imagery-based group intervention titled 'Envision the Rhythms of Life'(ERL). METHODS: Breast cancer survivors >6 weeks post-treatment were randomized to attend five weekly 4-h group sessions at a community center with therapist present (live delivery (LD), n = 48), therapist streamed via telemedicine (telemedicine delivery (TD), n = 23), or to a waitlist control (WL) group (n = 47). Weekly individual phone calls to encourage at-home practice began at session one and continued until the 3-month follow-up. Seven self-report measures of QOL were examined at baseline, 1-month and 3-month post-treatments including health-related and breast cancer-specific QOL, fatigue, cognitive function, spirituality, distress, and sleep. RESULTS: The Bonferroni method was used to correct for multiple comparisons, and alpha was adjusted to 0.01. Linear multilevel modeling analyses revealed less fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and sleep disturbance for LD and TD compared with WL across the follow-up (p's < 0.01). Changes in fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep disturbance, and health-related and breast cancer-related QOL were clinically significant. There were no differences between LD and TD. CONCLUSIONS: Both the live and telemedicine delivered ERL intervention resulted in improvements in multiple QOL domains for breast cancer survivors compared with WL. Further, there were no significant differences between LD and TD, suggesting telemedicine delivered ERL intervention may represent an effective and viable option for cancer survivors in remote areas.


Asunto(s)
Terapia Conductista/métodos , Neoplasias de la Mama/rehabilitación , Disfunción Cognitiva/prevención & control , Imágenes en Psicoterapia , Calidad de Vida , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/prevención & control , Sobrevivientes/psicología , Telemedicina , Adulto , Anciano , Neoplasias de la Mama/psicología , Disfunción Cognitiva/etiología , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/prevención & control , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/etiología , Espiritualidad , Listas de Espera
6.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24527052

RESUMEN

Objectives. This study examines the short- and long-term QOL benefits of a music therapy intervention for patients recovering from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods. Ninety allogeneic HSCT patients, after transplant, were randomized to receive ISO-principle (i.e., mood matching) based music therapy (MT; n = 29), unstructured music (UM; n = 30), or usual care (UC; n = 31) for four weeks. The ISO principle posits that patients may shift their mood from one state to another by listening to music that is "equal to" the individual's initial mood state and subsequently listening to music selections that gradually shift in tempo and mood to match the patient's desired disposition. Participants in MT and UM groups developed two audio CDs to help them feel more relaxed and energized and were instructed to use the CDs to improve their mood as needed. Short-term effects on mood and long-term effects on QOL were examined. Results. MT and UM participants reported improved mood immediately after listening to CDs; the within-group effect was greater for UM participants compared to MT participants. Participant group was not associated with long-term QOL outcomes. Conclusions. Music listening improves mood acutely but was not associated with long-term benefits in this study.

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