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Métodos Terapéuticos y Terapias MTCI
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Psychol Trauma ; 2022 Mar 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35357878

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Potentially morally injurious events (PMIEs) are events that contradict one's own personal ethics and may promote a deep sense of violation, leading to psychological distress. Individuals with greater trait gratitude and mindfulness may be less likely to perceive events as being morally injurious and may, in turn, be less likely to experience subsequent distress. The current study seeks to examine (a) PMIE rates in a multioccupational first responder sample and (b) the indirect effect of trait gratitude and mindfulness on psychological distress via fewer perceived PMIEs. METHOD: 293 first responders from agencies/departments within southeastern Texas (in-person) and nationwide (online) completed a survey assessing PMIEs, PTSD symptoms (PCL-C), anxiety (GAD-7), depression (PHQ-8), gratitude (GRAT-S), and mindfulness (MAAS). RESULTS: PMIEs were common (61% witnessed a transgression; 21% committed a transgression; 40% felt betrayed by others). Gratitude was indirectly associated with fewer PTSD [-.09, 95% CI (-.13, -.05)], anxiety [-.03, 95% CI (-.04, -.01)], and depression [-.03, 95% CI (-.05, -.01)] symptoms via lower PMIEs. Similarly, mindfulness was indirectly associated with fewer PTSD [-.92, 95% CI (-1.55, -.38)], anxiety [-.20, 95% CI (-.42, .02)], and depression [-.26, 95% CI (-.48, -.06)] symptoms via lower PMIEs. CONCLUSIONS: PMIEs were common in this first responder sample and associated with increased distress. Trait gratitude and mindfulness may protect first responders from perceiving events as morally injurious, which may lead to improved mental health. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).

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