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1.
Noise Health ; 26(120): 25-29, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38570307

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of music nursing as a complementary therapy on anxiety, fatigue, and quality of life in children with acute leukemia (AL). METHODS: This study included 150 children with AL admitted to our hospital from August 2021 to August 2023 and divided them into two groups based on treatment: the control (n = 76, received routine nursing) and observation (n = 74, received music nursing on the basis of routine nursing) groups. Comparison of groups was performed in terms of general information, anxiety, fatigue, and quality of life at admission (T0) and 1 month after admission (T1). RESULTS: No significant differences were observed in the general data between the two groups (P > 0.05). Anxiety, fatigue, and quality of life of the two groups also showed no significant differences at T0 (P > 0.05). The observation group showed significantly lower anxiety than the control group at T1 (P < 0.05). At T1, the observation group exhibited a lower fatigue degree compared with the control group (P < 0.05). At T1, the observation group attained higher scores on physiological and emotional dimensions of the quality of life compared with the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Music nursing for AL children, which has a certain clinical application value, can effectively reduce their anxiety and fatigue and improve their quality of life.


Asunto(s)
Terapias Complementarias , Leucemia , Musicoterapia , Música , Niño , Humanos , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Estudios Retrospectivos , Ansiedad/etiología , Ansiedad/terapia , Leucemia/terapia , Musicoterapia/métodos , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia
2.
J Health Popul Nutr ; 43(1): 48, 2024 Apr 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38576058

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Integrated-pathy aims to integrate modern medicine with traditional systems via applying the holistic approach of Ayurveda, Yoga, and natural medicine. This is important for addressing the challenges surrounding the delivery of long-term palliative care for chronic ailments including cancer. The prime intent of this study was to substantiate the underlying hypothesis behind the differential and integrative approach having a positive impact on Quality of Life of cancer patients. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional Observational study. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was developed and used, after obtaining written informed consent from patients to assess the impact of Integrated-pathy on patients (n = 103) diagnosed with cancer receiving care at Patanjali Yoggram. The research was carried out over 8 months. All participants received a uniform treatment protocol as prescribed by Patanjali. For the sample size determination and validation, α and 1-ß was calculated and for the significance of the pre- and post-treatment QoL ratings, Shapiro wilk test and other descriptive statistics techniques were explored. RESULTS: A total of 103 patients seeking cancer special-healthcare were interviewed, out of which 39 (37.86%) remained finally based on the inclusion/exclusion criteria with age (25-65 years), types of cancers (Carcinoma and Sarcoma), chemotherapy/radiotherapy received or not, before opting Integrated-pathy. Follow-ups revealed a significant increase in the QoL (17.91%) after receiving the integrated therapy over a course of at least 1 month. Further, a significant reduction in cancer-related pain followed by an increase in QoL index was reported in the patients. Shapiro-wilk test revealed significant pairing (p < 0.001) with validation of the model using test. CONCLUSIONS: To bolster evidence-based backing for Integrated-pathy, there is a need for clearly delineated clinical indicators that are measurable and trackable over time. Clinical investigators are encouraged to incorporate Integrated-pathy into their proposed interventions and conduct analogous studies to yield sustained advantages in the long run.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias , Calidad de Vida , Humanos , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Anciano , Estudios Transversales , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Neoplasias/terapia , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia
3.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 23: 15347354241237972, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38654515

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer survivors often suffer from diagnosis- and therapy-related long-term side effects, such as cancer related fatigue, restricted stress resilience and quality of life. Walking as a physical activity and mindfulness practice have been shown to be helpful in studies. The aim of this study was to compare the individual experiences and subjectively perceived effects of walking in combination with mindfulness practice with moderate walking alone in breast cancer patients. This paper focuses on the qualitative results of a mixed-methods pilot study. METHODS: Breast cancer patients who had finished their primary oncologic treatment at least 6 months ago were randomized to an 8-week group intervention program of either mindful walking or moderate walking. Within the qualitative study part, semi-structured focus group interviews (2 interviews per study arm) were conducted and analyzed using a qualitative content analysis approach. Audio recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and pseudonymized. The subsequent data analysis was performed by using MAXQDA®. RESULTS: A total of 51 women (mean age 55.8 [SD 10.9] years) were included in the RCT, among these 20 (mean age 56.7 [SD 12.0] years) participated in the focus group interviews (n = 11 patients of the mindful walking group; n = 9 patients of the walking group). Breast cancer patients in both groups described different effects in the complex areas of self-efficacy, coping, body awareness and self-reflection. While mindful walking primarily promoted body awareness and inner strength by mindfulness in breast cancer patients, moderate walking promoted self-efficacy by a confidence of their body and an easily integrated and accepted way of physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Study interventions and the study setting triggered processes and reflections on one's own health and situation. However, mindful walking and moderate walking seem to address different resources. This important knowledge may help oncologists and other therapists to assess what type of interventions can best meet the needs and requirements of individual patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: DKRS00011521; prospectively registered 21.12.2016; https://drks.de/search/de/trial/DRKS00011521.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama , Atención Plena , Investigación Cualitativa , Calidad de Vida , Caminata , Humanos , Femenino , Neoplasias de la Mama/psicología , Neoplasias de la Mama/terapia , Atención Plena/métodos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Caminata/fisiología , Caminata/psicología , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Grupos Focales , Proyectos Piloto , Supervivientes de Cáncer/psicología , Anciano , Adulto , Fatiga/terapia , Fatiga/psicología
4.
Semin Oncol Nurs ; 40(2): 151619, 2024 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38503656

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This study systematically investigates the evidence regarding the use of probiotics in managing cancer-related fatigue (CRF). STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. DATA SOURCES: The systematic search encompassed six databases: PubMed, CINHAL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Web of Science, Scopus, and EMBASE, covering the period from inception to December 2023. The assessment of risk of bias employed the Cochrane risk of bias tool (RoB 2). A narrative synthesis and an exploratory meta-analysis were conducted to summarize the evidence. RESULTS: Among 460 records, three studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in the review. These studies involved a total of 284 participants with colorectal and breast cancer. One study demonstrated a marginal improvement in CRF postchemotherapy in colorectal cancer patients using probiotics. Another study, also using probiotics, reported a significant reduction in CRF among colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Additionally, a study employing synbiotics showed a substantial decrease in CRF severity in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. CONCLUSION: The study presents initial but varied evidence suggesting the potential of probiotics and synbiotics as adjunctive therapies in managing CRF alongside anticancer treatments. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: In nursing practice, large-scale clinical trials are urgently needed to evaluate the effectiveness of probiotics in treating cancer-related fatigue during cancer therapy. Insights from this review could guide nurses in selecting appropriate probiotic strains and integrating microbiome modifiers into comprehensive care plans, potentially enhancing the quality of life for cancer patients.


Asunto(s)
Fatiga , Neoplasias , Probióticos , Humanos , Fatiga/terapia , Fatiga/etiología , Probióticos/uso terapéutico , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Femenino , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Neoplasias Colorrectales/complicaciones , Masculino
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 103(11): e37480, 2024 Mar 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38489718

RESUMEN

Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common symptom among patients with cancer, with a prevalence of >49%. CRF significantly affects the quality of life of patients and may also affect their overall survival. Pharmacological interventions serve as a last resort after carefully weighing the risks and benefits, with limited benefits for patients, many side effects, and adverse reactions. Compared to traditional medicine, nutritional approaches have fewer side effects, are highly accepted by patients, and do not affect the antitumor treatment of patients. Many studies have shown that nutritional approaches, as a form of complementary and alternative medicine, help improve the symptoms of CRF and the quality of life of patients. This study was designed to examine nutritional approaches to CRF and assess their effectiveness of nutritional approaches in improving CRF. We present an overview of clinical trials investigating nutritional approaches for CRF that have been published over the last 2 decades. A total of 33 records were obtained from 3 databases: Web of Science, MEDLINE, and PubMed. Some nutritional approaches, such as melatonin, PG2, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine, are potential options for CRF treatment. However, the trials included in the review varied widely in quality, most were weak in methodology, and there is currently insufficient evidence to conclude with certainty the effectiveness of nutritional approaches in reducing CRF. Therefore, the design and methods used in future complementary and alternative medicine trials should be more rigorous.


Asunto(s)
Terapias Complementarias , Neoplasias , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Neoplasias/terapia , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia
6.
Brain Inj ; 38(6): 403-416, 2024 May 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38402580

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to conduct a scoping review to determine the nature, variety, and volume of empirical evidence on nonpharmacological interventions for sleep disturbances with potential implications for fatigue in adults sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted across four databases to identify primary studies testing a single non-pharmacological intervention or a combination of non-pharmacological interventions for sleep disturbances and fatigue in community-dwelling adults with TBI. RESULTS: Sixteen studies were reviewed addressing six non-pharmacological interventions for sleep disruptions and fatigue after TBI including light therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, warm footbath application, shiatsu, and sleep hygiene protocol. Non-pharmacological interventions involving light or cognitive-behavioral therapy were reported in 75% of the studies. Actigraphy-based estimation of total sleep time and subjective level of fatigue were frequent outcomes. CONCLUSION: While this scoping review has utility in describing existing non-pharmacological approaches to manage sleep and fatigue after TBI, the findings suggest that interventions are often developed without considering TBI individuals' source of motivation and the need for support in self-administration. Future studies may achieve greater sustainability by considering the evolving needs of TBI patients and their families and the drivers and barriers that might influence non-pharmacological intervention use at home.


Asunto(s)
Lesiones Traumáticas del Encéfalo , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia , Adulto , Humanos , Lesiones Traumáticas del Encéfalo/complicaciones , Lesiones Traumáticas del Encéfalo/terapia , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Sueño , Higiene del Sueño , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/etiología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/terapia
7.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 23: 15347354241233517, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38385326

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cancer is a chronic condition associated with a substantial symptom burden, which can impair recovery after treatment. Investigating interventions with potential to improve self-reported disease and/or treatment effects-known as patient-reported outcomes (PROs)-is paramount to inform cancer care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a yoga therapy (YT) intervention on key PROs (ie, cancer-related fatigue, anxiety, cognitive function, depression, stress, quality of life [QoL]) among adults after treatment for cancer. METHODS: Data from 20 adults (Mage = 55.74 years, 85% female; Mtime since diagnosis = 2.83 years) who had completed treatment for cancer were analyzed for this study. In this single-subject exploratory experimental study, the YT intervention comprised a 1:1 YT session (ie, 1 participant with 1 yoga therapist) followed by 6 weekly small (ie, 2-3 participants) group YT sessions. Group sessions were facilitated by the same yoga therapist who delivered participants' 1:1 session to ensure an in-depth personalized approach. PROs were assessed before (ie, pre-intervention) and after the 1:1 YT session (ie, during the intervention), as well as after the last group YT session (ie, post-intervention). Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Participants showed improvements in cancer-related fatigue, state anxiety, trait anxiety, perceived cognitive impairments, impacts of perceived cognitive impairments on QoL, and 1 dimension of QoL (ie, functional wellbeing) over time. Notably, cancer-related fatigue and state anxiety increased immediately after the 1:1 session, but showed greater improvements over time afterward (ie, during the intervention phase). No changes were observed for the remaining PROs. CONCLUSION: Although results require confirmation in future trials, this study highlights the importance of continuing to investigate YT as an intervention to enhance important PROs (ie, cancer-related fatigue and state anxiety) after treatment for cancer. More research is needed to identify additional beneficial effects and factors that influence participants' responses to 1:1 and group YT (ie, moderators and mediators). REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN64763228. DATE OF REGISTRATION: December 12, 2021. This trial was registered retrospectively. URL OF TRIAL REGISTRY RECORD: https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN64763228. PUBLISHED PROTOCOL: Brunet, J., Wurz, A., Hussien, J., Pitman, A., Conte, E., Ennis, J. K., . . . & Seely, D. (2022). Exploring the Effects of Yoga Therapy on Heart Rate Variability and Patient-Reported Outcomes After Cancer Treatment: A Study Protocol. Integrative Cancer Therapies, 21, 15347354221075576.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias , Yoga , Adulto , Humanos , Femenino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Masculino , Yoga/psicología , Calidad de Vida , Depresión/etiología , Depresión/terapia , Depresión/psicología , Proyectos de Investigación , Estudios Retrospectivos , Neoplasias/terapia , Neoplasias/psicología , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Medición de Resultados Informados por el Paciente
8.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 23: 15347354241233226, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38372234

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide, and most patients experience fatigue. However, there are no effective treatments for cancer-related fatigue (CRF). Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have suggested that moxibustion improves CRF. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the differences in fatigue scale scores, quality of life, and clinical efficacy in patients with breast cancer who developed CRF and did versus did not receive moxibustion. METHODS: RCTs were searched in 7 databases using a standardized search method from database inception to March 2023, and RCTs that met the inclusion criteria were selected. RESULTS: Among 1337 initially identified RCTs, 10 RCTs involving 744 participants were selected for this study. The meta-analysis involved assessment of the revised Piper Fatigue Scale scores, Cancer Fatigue Scale scores, Karnofsky Performance Scale scores, Athens Insomnia Scale scores, clinical efficacy, and Qi deficiency syndrome scale scores. Compared with the control, moxibustion was associated with significantly better Piper Fatigue Scale scores (P < 0.0001), quality of life [Karnofsky Performance Scale scores (P < 0.0001)], clinical efficacy (P = 0.0007), and Qi deficiency syndrome scale scores (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Moxibustion improves CRF in patients with breast cancer. The efficacy of moxibustion should be further examined by high-quality studies in various countries with patients subdivided by their breast cancer treatment status. REGISTRATION: PROSPERO ID: CRD42023451292.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama , Moxibustión , Humanos , Femenino , Moxibustión/métodos , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Neoplasias de la Mama/terapia , Calidad de Vida , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Resultado del Tratamiento
9.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 23: 15347354231226127, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38317410

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: People living with a cancer diagnosis often experience cancer-related fatigue (CRF). Between 9% and 45% of people report CRF as moderate to severe, negatively impacting their quality-of-life (QOL). The evidence-base for managing CRF recommends exercise-related therapies over pharmaceutical interventions. One such exercise-like therapy is Baduanjin mind-body exercise (MBE), which has additional benefits. A remotely delivered program may further benefit people with CRF. The primary objective of this pilot will test study feasibility of a remotely delivered Baduanjin MBE exercise program for people living with CRF. METHODS: This is a randomized wait-list controlled pilot study and will take place in Sydney, Australia. Subject to informed consent, 40 adults with moderate CRF levels and receiving or previously received adjuvant chemotherapy, will undertake a home-based 8-week Baduanjin MBE program supported by online resources and instructors. The primary feasibility outcomes are recruitment, enrollment, retention, and adherence rates; and safety as measured by tolerance and adverse-event frequency. Clinical outcomes (eg, changes in CRF, QOL, and participant perceptions) are assessed at pre-intervention, week 1, week 4, week 8, and post-intervention. Analyses follows the Intent-to-Treat (all participants as per randomization) and per-protocol (participants adhering to the protocol). Missing data will be imputed from previous data entries and regression models may be tested to predict missing outcomes. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the feasibility and effects of Baduanjin MBE on CRF using a remote delivery method. These feasibility data will inform a fully powered future trial investigating evidence of effect on CRF and QOL.Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR 12623000177651).Ringgold ID: 651498 Chinese Medicine Centre.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias , Calidad de Vida , Adulto , Humanos , Estudios de Factibilidad , Australia , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto
10.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 38(2): 85-92, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38363969

RESUMEN

Patients with heart failure (HF) reported poor quality of life (QOL) due to different reasons among which fatigue is the most important. Improving QOL is a crucial objective for patients with HF and their primary health care providers. Managing fatigue with medication is not enough. Benson's relaxation technique (BRT) is a complementary therapy used to manage fatigue among different populations with limited studies checking its effect among patients diagnosed with HF. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to check the effect of BRT on fatigue and QOL among 140 (68 intervention and 72 control) patients diagnosed with HF. Intervention group performed BRT for 20 minutes twice a day for 2 months. Control group received regular care from their health care providers. At baseline, there were no differences between intervention and control groups regarding fatigue, physical component summary, and mental component summary. At follow-up, intervention group had higher scores in physical and mental component summaries than control group (45.48 ± 10.52 vs 37.97 ± 14.78) and (46.22 ± 8.39 vs 41.01 ± 10.36), respectively. Also, intervention group had lower levels of fatigue than control group (2.54 ± 0.87 vs 6.33 ± 0.61). In conclusion, the use of BRT as a complementary therapy for patients with HF might decrease fatigue level and improve QOL.


Asunto(s)
Insuficiencia Cardíaca , Calidad de Vida , Humanos , Terapia por Relajación/métodos , Pacientes , Insuficiencia Cardíaca/complicaciones , Insuficiencia Cardíaca/terapia , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia
11.
J Chin Med Assoc ; 87(3): 340-345, 2024 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38289295

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In 2018, 84 615 patients in Taiwan received hemodialysis, of which about 62% to 97% suffered from fatigue. Fatigue caused by hemodialysis may be mental or physical. However, the detailed mechanism remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate whether far-infrared stimulation of the Neiguan acupoint (P6) could effectively reduce fatigue and improve heart rate variability (HRV) in hemodialysis patients. METHODS: We conducted a two-arm, randomized trial in a hemodialysis center between March 2015 and March 2016. A total of 73 hemodialysis patients were included and were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 36). The experimental group received far-infrared radiation on Neiguan acupoint during hemodialysis for 12 weeks. The outcomes were fatigue level and HRV. RESULTS: All patients showed moderate fatigue ( M = 26.00 ± 13.01, range = 0-78) at baseline. Far-infrared stimulation on Neiguan acupoint significantly reduced overall fatigue ( ß = 24, p < 0.001) and improved HRV ( ß = 74.36, p < 0.001). Compared to the control group, the experiment group had significantly reduced fatigue levels in all aspects such as reduced energy and motivation ( ß = -2.97, p < 0.001), reduced physical strength ( ß = -1.28, p < 0.01), reduced mental capability ( ß = -2.38, p < 0.001), reduction in daily activities ( ß = -1.48, p < 0.01), depressed mood and loss of control ( ß = -1.21, p < 0.05) as well as increased autonomous nervous system activity ( ß = 14.71, p < 0.01) in the third month of stimulation. CONCLUSION: Far-infrared stimulation of the Neiguan acupoints effectively reduces fatigue and increases autonomic nervous system activity in hemodialysis patients.


Asunto(s)
Puntos de Acupuntura , Diálisis Renal , Humanos , Frecuencia Cardíaca/fisiología , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Taiwán
12.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 152: 104694, 2024 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38281450

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients, usually accompanied by anxiety, depression and insomnia, which seriously affect patients' quality of life. Progressive muscle relaxation training is widely used for cancer-related fatigue, but the overall effect is unclear. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to summarize the evidence on the effects of progressive muscle relaxation training on cancer-related fatigue and quality of life in cancer patients. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: Nine electronic databases (PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), The Cochrane Library (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CENTRAL), Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP) and Wanfang Database) were explored for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published before February 2023. This study was reported based on the PRISMA 2020 statement. The Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool was used for methodological assessment, and the GRADE pro online assessment tool was used for evidence evaluation. The data were analyzed with the Review Manager 5.4 software. RESULTS: Twelve studies involving 1047 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that progressive muscle relaxation training plus routine nursing produced more positive effects than routine nursing in improving cancer-related fatigue [SMD = -1.06, 95 % CI -1.49, -0.62, P < 0.00001], anxiety [SMD = -1.09, 95 % CI -1.40, -0.77, P < 0.00001], depression [SMD = -1.43, 95 % CI -1.76, -1.10, P < 0.00001], and quality of sleep [MD = -1.41, 95 % CI -1.74, -1.08, P < 0.00001]. However, there was no significant difference in improving quality of life [SMD = 0.27, 95 % CI -0.62, 1.15, P = 0.55]. Progressive resistance exercise plus routine nursing improved cancer-related fatigue more than progressive muscle relaxation training plus routine nursing [SMD = 1.11, 95 % CI 0.43, 1.78, P = 0.001]. There was low certainty of evidence that progressive muscle relaxation training improved cancer-related fatigue and quality of sleep, and the evidence that improved quality of life, anxiety and depression was very low. CONCLUSION: Current evidence suggested that progressive muscle relaxation training has the potential to improve cancer-related fatigue, anxiety, depression and quality of sleep in patients with cancer and is a low-load, simple exercise worthy of recommendation for cancer patients in fatigue state. Future research should focus on improving the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials to enhance the persuasive evidence of progressive muscle relaxation training efficacy.


Asunto(s)
Entrenamiento Autogénico , Neoplasias , Humanos , Ejercicio Físico , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Calidad de Vida
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 103(1): e36468, 2024 Jan 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38181269

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a common malignant tumor in women and most patients with breast cancer experience fatigue. Numerous studies have investigated the relationship between yoga and cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in patients with breast cancer. However, these studies drew their conclusions from small sample sizes and lacked sufficient evidence to demonstrate that yoga can effectively alleviate CRF. Therefore, this meta-analysis aims to systematically examine the effects of yoga on cancer fatigue in patients with breast cancer and establish a scientific basis for enhancing their quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of yoga on CRF in patients with breast cancer. METHODS: Computer searches were conducted on PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, CKNI, and Wanfang databases to retrieve articles related to yoga and CRF in patients with breast cancer from the hospital establishment date to July 2023. The literature was independently screened, and the information was extracted by the researchers. A meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager Software (version 5.3). RESULTS: The findings from the meta-analysis of 18 studies indicate that yoga can effectively enhance CFR (standardized mean difference (SMD) = -0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.92 to -0.10), improve sleep quality (MD = -3.86, 95%CI = -4.03 to -3.70) in patients with breast cancer, alleviate anxiety and depression (SMD = -0.93, 95%CI = -1.68, -0.18, SMD = -1.23, 95%CI = -2.02 to -0.44), and enhance quality of life (MD = -11.20, 95%CI = -14.16 to -8.24). CONCLUSION: Our study offers evidence for the subsequent reduction of CFR in patients with breast cancer. Yoga can alleviate fatigue, improve sleep quality and negative emotions, and improve the quality of life of patients with breast cancer.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama , Yoga , Humanos , Femenino , Neoplasias de la Mama/complicaciones , Calidad de Vida , Mama , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia
14.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 24(1): 32, 2024 Jan 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38212747

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: As cancer and its therapy comes with a wide range of negative effects, people look for options to mitigate these effects. Reflexology is among the options of complementary medicine. METHOD: In March 2022 a systematic search was conducted searching five electronic databases (Embase, Cochrane, PsychInfo, CINAHL and Medline) to find studies concerning the use, effectiveness and potential harm of reflexology on cancer patients. RESULTS: From all 821 search results, 29 publications concerning 26 studies with 2465 patients were included in this systematic review. The patients treated with reflexology were mainly diagnosed with breast, lung, gastrointestinal and hematological cancer. Outcomes were mainly pain, quality of life, anxiety, depression, fatigue. The studies had moderate to low quality and reported heterogeneous results: Some studies reported significant improvements in above mentioned outcomes while other studies did not find any changes concerning these endpoints. CONCLUSION: Due to the very heterogeneous results and methodical limitations of the included studies, a clear statement regarding the effectiveness of reflexology on cancer patients is not possible. The current evidence indicates that reflexology is superior to passive control groups for pain, quality of life and fatigue, however, more studies with comparable active control groups are needed.


Asunto(s)
Manipulaciones Musculoesqueléticas , Neoplasias , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Dolor , Neoplasias/terapia , Fatiga/terapia
15.
Eur J Med Res ; 29(1): 46, 2024 Jan 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38212813

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Caring for hemodialysis patients could be a heavy burden on family caregivers, causing them to become fatigued and decrease their quality of life. This study aimed to investigate whether Jacobson's relaxation can help alleviate the fatigue of family caregivers of hemodialysis patients. METHODS: This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2021. Sixty-six family caregivers of hemodialysis patients were recruited by convenience sampling from a referral hospital in Tehran, Iran, and assigned randomly by coin toss to two groups of experimental (n = 32) and control (n = 34). Caregivers in the experimental group performed Jacobson's relaxation three times a week, each time for 30-45 min, for 30 days. The score and severity of fatigue before, 2 weeks after, and 1 month after the intervention were measured with the Fatigue Severity Scale. Data analysis was performed in the statistics software SPSS using descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage, mean, and standard deviation) and analytic statistics (Independent Samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, Chi-Square test, Fisher's exact test, and RM-ANOVA test). The significance level was less than 0.05. RESULTS: The fatigue scores of the experimental and control groups were not significantly different before the intervention (4.42 ± 0.42 vs. 4.38 ± 0.42, P = 0.696). However, the experimental group had significantly lower fatigue scores than the control group 2 weeks after the intervention (4.11 ± 0.63 vs. 4.39 ± 0.42, P = 0.036) and 1 month after the intervention (3.5 ± 0.71 vs. 4.4 ± 0.44, P = 0.001). The results also showed a significant drop in the fatigue score of the experimental group after the intervention (P < 0.0001), but no such change in the control group (P = 0.662). CONCLUSION: Jacobson's relaxation technique was effective in alleviating the fatigue of family caregivers of hemodialysis patients. Nurses are therefore recommended to promote the technique as a safe and easy method of fatigue management for family caregivers.


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores , Terapia por Relajación , Humanos , Terapia por Relajación/métodos , Calidad de Vida , Irán , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Diálisis Renal
16.
Explore (NY) ; 20(1): 82-88, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37400355

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Measures to reduce nurses' fatigue are necessary to improve the patient's care and the nurse's health and well-being. This study investigated the effectiveness of aromatherapy with Pelargonium graveolens (P. graveolens) essential oil on fatigue and sleep quality of nurses working in intensive care units (ICU). METHODS: In this double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial, 84 nurses working in the ICU of Covid-19 patients were assigned to two groups of P. graveolens and placebo by the stratified block method. The intervention group inhaled one drop of pure P. graveolens. The placebo group inhaled one drop of pure sunflower oil in three consecutive shifts (morning or evening) and each shift twice for 20 min. Using the Visual Analog Fatigue Scale (VAS-F), fatigue was measured 30 min before the intervention, immediately, and 60 min later. Also, on the morning of the intervention days, sleep quality was assessed with the Verran and Snyder-Halpern (VSH) Sleep Scale. Data analysis was performed using SPSS, version 24. Independent t-tests, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square tests, and MANOVA, were used. RESULTS: The mean score of fatigue immediately and 60 min after aromatherapy in the P. graveolens group was lower than in the control group (P Ë‚ 0.05). There was no significant difference between the mean sleep scores of nurses in the P. graveolens group before and after the intervention (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Inhalation aromatherapy with P. graveolens essential oil can reduce nurses' fatigue in the ICU. The findings of this study can make nurses interested in using aromatherapy as a self-care method.


Asunto(s)
Aromaterapia , COVID-19 , Aceites Volátiles , Pelargonium , Humanos , Aromaterapia/métodos , Calidad del Sueño , Pandemias , Aceites Volátiles/uso terapéutico , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Cuidados Críticos
17.
J Holist Nurs ; 42(1): 64-78, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37128683

RESUMEN

Purpose: To evaluate effectiveness of chairside yoga therapy on perceptions of fatigue, pain, nausea, anxiety, and distress among oncology patients concurrently receiving outpatient cancer infusion therapy. Design: This prospective pilot study used pre-/post-survey design in convenience sample of cancer patients in outpatient setting. Methods: Researchers developed and administered the Outpatient Cancer Symptom Assessment Scale (OCSAS) comprised of cancer- or treatment-related symptoms commonly reported in the oncology population (nausea, pain, fatigue, anxiety, and distress). Following IRB approval, symptoms were rated using Likert scale of 0 (not present) to 10 (severe) before and after chairside yoga therapy delivered concurrently with outpatient infusions. Qualitative data was collected related to patients' overall infusion experience. Findings: Participants (n = 82) reported positive patient experiences and statistically less pain (p < 0.001), fatigue (p < 0.001), anxiety (p < 0.001), and distress (p < 0.001) following the yoga intervention compared to baseline. Nausea was not significantly impacted by the yoga intervention. Conclusions: Yoga therapy received concurrently during outpatient cancer infusion is consistent with a holistic and integrative approach to care for the oncology population. Yoga therapy offers promise for reducing symptoms which negatively impact quality of life, including pain, fatigue, anxiety, and distress. Qualitative data suggests patients' overall infusion experience was enhanced with yoga therapy.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias , Yoga , Humanos , Pacientes Ambulatorios , Calidad de Vida , Estudios de Factibilidad , Proyectos Piloto , Estudios Prospectivos , Depresión/terapia , Ansiedad/terapia , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Neoplasias/terapia , Dolor , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Náusea
19.
Technol Health Care ; 32(2): 1135-1148, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37781832

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although the prognosis of ovarian cancer can be significantly improved through standardized surgery and chemotherapy, 70% of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients would suffer from drug resistance and recurrence during the long chemotherapy cycle. OBJECTIVE: To explore the impact of a training mode based on the integration of virtual reality technology and mindfulness on anxiety, depression, and cancer-related fatigue in ovarian cancer patients during chemotherapy. METHOD: Through virtual reality technology, a mindfulness training software was designed and developed, and a mindfulness training mode based on virtual reality technology was constructed. Using a self-controlled design, 48 ovarian cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy who were hospitalized in a tertiary hospital in Beijing from August 2022 to May 2023 were conveniently selected as the research subjects. The patients were subjected to four weeks of mindfulness training based on virtual reality technology, and the acceptance of the mindfulness training mode using virtual reality technology was evaluated. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Cancer Related Fatigue Scale (CRF) were used to evaluate the anxiety, depression, and fatigue of patients before and after intervention. RESULTS: The virtual reality based mindfulness training mode includes four functional modules: personalized curriculum, intelligent monitoring, emotion tracking, and Funny Games. 48 patients had a high acceptance score (139.21 ± 10.47), and after using mindfulness training mode based on virtual reality technology, anxiety, depression, and cancer-related fatigue in ovarian cancer patients during chemotherapy were significantly reduced, with a statistically significant difference (p< 0.001). CONCLUSION: Ovarian cancer patients during chemotherapy have a high acceptance of virtual reality based mindfulness training mode. The application of this mode can reduce the psychological problems of anxiety, depression, and cancer-related fatigue in ovarian cancer patients during chemotherapy, and is worth promoting and using.


Asunto(s)
Atención Plena , Neoplasias Ováricas , Realidad Virtual , Humanos , Femenino , Depresión/etiología , Depresión/terapia , Ansiedad/etiología , Ansiedad/terapia , Neoplasias Ováricas/complicaciones , Neoplasias Ováricas/tratamiento farmacológico , Fatiga/etiología , Fatiga/terapia , Fatiga/psicología
20.
Explore (NY) ; 20(2): 222-230, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37640590

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The management of well-known and common complaints such as insomnia and fatigue experienced in the menopausal period has the potential to affect many aspects of life in women during this period positively. This research was carried out to determine the effect of therapeutic touch on sleep quality and fatigue in menopausal women. METHODS: This randomized controlled experimental study was conducted with 48 (24 in the intervention group and 24 in the control group) women who sought treatment in the gynecological outpatient clinic of a public hospital. According to the study procedure, while the intervention group received therapeutic touch, the control group received SHAM therapeutic touch for 10 min a day for five consecutive days. Data were collected through the Personal Information Form, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Piper Fatigue Scale. RESULTS: The median post-test total sleep quality score was significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group (p=0.010). However, the mean total fatigue scores did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.917). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study showed that therapeutic touch was effective in improving sleep quality, but it did not affect fatigue in menopausal women.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Tacto Terapéutico , Femenino , Humanos , Calidad del Sueño , Menopausia , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/terapia , Fatiga/terapia , Sueño
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