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1.
BMC Pediatr ; 24(1): 260, 2024 Apr 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38641790

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Birth defects (BDs) are the major causes of infant morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries. Regardless of their clinical importance, few studies on predisposing factors have been conducted in Ethiopia. However, due to a lack of advanced diagnostic materials, we only considered the externally visible BDs. OBJECTIVE: To assess the determinants of externally visible birth defects among perinatal deaths at Adama Comprehensive Specialized Hospital. METHODS: A retrospective unmatched case-control study design was conducted from November 01 to 30, 2021. The sample size was determined by Epi Info version 7 software considering sample size calculation for an unmatched case-control study. A total of 315 participants (63 cases, and 252 controls) were selected by simple random sampling. Data were collected by an open data kit (ODK) and transported to a statical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 26 software for analysis. The bivariate followed by multivariable logistic regression analyses were done to determine the factors associated with the BD. RESULTS: This study showed that drinking alcohol during pregnancy (AOR = 6.575; 95% CI: 3.102,13.937), lack of antenatal care (ANC) follow-up during pregnancy (AOR = 2.794; 95% CI: 1.333, 5.859), having a history of stillbirth in a previous pregnancy (AOR = 3.967; 95% CI: 1.772, 8.881), exposure to pesticides during pregnancy (AOR = 4.840; 95% CI: 1.375, 17.034), having a history of BDs in a previous pregnancy (AOR = 4.853; 95% CI: 1.492, 15.788), and lack of folic acid supplementation during early pregnancy (AOR = 4.324; 95% CI: 2.062, 9.067) were significant determinants of externally visible BDs among perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: In this study, alcohol use, exposure to pesticides, and lack of folic acid supplementation during pregnancy were identified as the major determinants of externally visible BDs among perinatal deaths. Thus, health education regarding the associated factors of BDs and their preventive strategies should be given to pregnant mothers.


Asunto(s)
Muerte Perinatal , Plaguicidas , Lactante , Embarazo , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Estudios Retrospectivos , Atención Prenatal , Ácido Fólico , Hospitales , Etiopía/epidemiología
2.
Nurs Health Sci ; 26(2): e13116, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38566393

RESUMEN

To understand the experience, training, and needs of midwives in their approach to perinatal grief. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out using an online questionnaire with 26 questions related to institutional management and individual clinical practices in the care of a perinatal loss was developed by a team of midwives from the Hospital "La Mancha-Centro" of Alcazar de San Juan (Ciudad Real). Strobe checklist was followed. A total of 267 midwives participated. A total of 92.1% (246) of the centers had specific protocols for action, but each professional applied their own criteria. The presence of a perinatal psychology team was nonexistent according to 88% (235) of those surveyed. Regarding their training and professional experience, 16.5% (44) of the midwives had never received training. Only 4.1% (11) of the midwives felt very prepared to care for women with a perinatal loss. Among the factors associated with greater application of recommended practices in the face of perinatal death by midwives were being a woman, having prior training on care during perinatal death, and a greater perception of preparation (p < 0.05). The perception of lack of preparation on the part of midwives in the accompaniment of these families was high.


Asunto(s)
Partería , Muerte Perinatal , Embarazo , Humanos , Femenino , Recién Nacido , Niño , Estudios Transversales , Ansiedad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Atención Perinatal/métodos
3.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 4: CD004667, 2024 04 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38597126

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Midwives are primary providers of care for childbearing women globally and there is a need to establish whether there are differences in effectiveness between midwife continuity of care models and other models of care. This is an update of a review published in 2016. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of midwife continuity of care models with other models of care for childbearing women and their infants. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (17 August 2022), as well as the reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: All published and unpublished trials in which pregnant women are randomly allocated to midwife continuity of care models or other models of care during pregnancy and birth. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion criteria, scientific integrity, and risk of bias, and carried out data extraction and entry. Primary outcomes were spontaneous vaginal birth, caesarean section, regional anaesthesia, intact perineum, fetal loss after 24 weeks gestation, preterm birth, and neonatal death. We used GRADE to rate the certainty of evidence. MAIN RESULTS: We included 17 studies involving 18,533 randomised women. We assessed all studies as being at low risk of scientific integrity/trustworthiness concerns. Studies were conducted in Australia, Canada, China, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. The majority of the included studies did not include women at high risk of complications. There are three ongoing studies targeting disadvantaged women. Primary outcomes Based on control group risks observed in the studies, midwife continuity of care models, as compared to other models of care, likely increase spontaneous vaginal birth from 66% to 70% (risk ratio (RR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03 to 1.07; 15 studies, 17,864 participants; moderate-certainty evidence), likelyreduce caesarean sections from 16% to 15% (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.99; 16 studies, 18,037 participants; moderate-certainty evidence), and likely result in little to no difference in intact perineum (29% in other care models and 31% in midwife continuity of care models, average RR 1.05, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.12; 12 studies, 14,268 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). There may belittle or no difference in preterm birth (< 37 weeks) (6% under both care models, average RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.16; 10 studies, 13,850 participants; low-certainty evidence). We arevery uncertain about the effect of midwife continuity of care models on regional analgesia (average RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.92; 15 studies, 17,754 participants, very low-certainty evidence), fetal loss at or after 24 weeks gestation (average RR 1.24, 95% CI 0.73 to 2.13; 12 studies, 16,122 participants; very low-certainty evidence), and neonatal death (average RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.71; 10 studies, 14,718 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Secondary outcomes When compared to other models of care, midwife continuity of care models likely reduce instrumental vaginal birth (forceps/vacuum) from 14% to 13% (average RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.96; 14 studies, 17,769 participants; moderate-certainty evidence), and may reduceepisiotomy 23% to 19% (average RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.91; 15 studies, 17,839 participants; low-certainty evidence). When compared to other models of care, midwife continuity of care models likelyresult in little to no difference inpostpartum haemorrhage (average RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.03; 11 studies, 14,407 participants; moderate-certainty evidence) and admission to special care nursery/neonatal intensive care unit (average RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.03; 13 studies, 16,260 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). There may be little or no difference in induction of labour (average RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.00; 14 studies, 17,666 participants; low-certainty evidence), breastfeeding initiation (average RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.12; 8 studies, 8575 participants; low-certainty evidence), and birth weight less than 2500 g (average RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.08; 9 studies, 12,420 participants; low-certainty evidence). We are very uncertain about the effect of midwife continuity of care models compared to other models of care onthird or fourth-degree tear (average RR 1.10, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.49; 7 studies, 9437 participants; very low-certainty evidence), maternal readmission within 28 days (average RR 1.52, 95% CI 0.78 to 2.96; 1 study, 1195 participants; very low-certainty evidence), attendance at birth by a known midwife (average RR 9.13, 95% CI 5.87 to 14.21; 11 studies, 9273 participants; very low-certainty evidence), Apgar score less than or equal to seven at five minutes (average RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.24; 13 studies, 12,806 participants; very low-certainty evidence) andfetal loss before 24 weeks gestation (average RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.01; 12 studies, 15,913 participants; very low-certainty evidence). No maternal deaths were reported across three studies. Although the observed risk of adverse events was similar between midwifery continuity of care models and other models, our confidence in the findings was limited. Our confidence in the findings was lowered by possible risks of bias, inconsistency, and imprecision of some estimates. There were no available data for the outcomes: maternal health status, neonatal readmission within 28 days, infant health status, and birth weight of 4000 g or more. Maternal experiences and cost implications are described narratively. Women receiving care from midwife continuity of care models, as opposed to other care models, generally reported more positive experiences during pregnancy, labour, and postpartum. Cost savings were noted in the antenatal and intrapartum periods in midwife continuity of care models. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Women receiving midwife continuity of care models were less likely to experience a caesarean section and instrumental birth, and may be less likely to experience episiotomy. They were more likely to experience spontaneous vaginal birth and report a positive experience. The certainty of some findings varies due to possible risks of bias, inconsistencies, and imprecision of some estimates. Future research should focus on the impact on women with social risk factors, and those at higher risk of complications, and implementation and scaling up of midwife continuity of care models, with emphasis on low- and middle-income countries.


Asunto(s)
Partería , Muerte Perinatal , Nacimiento Prematuro , Lactante , Embarazo , Recién Nacido , Femenino , Humanos , Cesárea , Peso al Nacer , Nacimiento Prematuro/epidemiología , Continuidad de la Atención al Paciente , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto
4.
BMJ Open ; 14(2): e080661, 2024 Feb 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38417962

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Perinatal mortality remains a pressing concern, especially in lower and middle-income nations. Globally, 1 in 72 babies are stillborn. Despite advancements, the 2030 targets are challenging, notably in sub-Saharan Africa. Post-war Liberia saw a 14% spike in perinatal mortality between 2013 and 2020, indicating the urgency for in-depth study. OBJECTIVE: The study aims to investigate the predictors of perinatal mortality in Liberia using 2013 and 2019-2020 Liberia Demographic and Health Survey datasets. METHODS: In a two-stage cluster design from the Liberia Demographic and Health Survey, 6572 and 5285 respondents were analysed for 2013 and 2019-2020, respectively. Data included women aged 15-49 with pregnancy histories. Descriptive statistics was used to analyse the sociodemographic characteristics, the exposure to media and the maternal health services. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to examine the predictors of perinatal mortality at a significance level of p value ≤0.05 and 95% CI. The data analysis was conducted in STATA V.14. RESULTS: Perinatal mortality rates increased from 30.23 per 1000 births in 2013 to 42.05 in 2019-2020. In 2013, increasing age of respondents showed a reduced risk of perinatal mortality rate. In both years, having one to three children significantly reduced mortality risk (2013: adjusted OR (aOR) 0.30, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.64; 2019: aOR 0.24, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.54), compared with not having a child. Weekly radio listenership increased mortality risk (2013: aOR 1.36, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.89; 2019: aOR 1.86, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.57) compared with not listening at all. Longer pregnancy intervals (p<0.0001) and receiving 2+ tetanus injections (p=0.019) were protective across both periods. However, iron supplementation showed varied effects, reducing risk in 2013 (aOR 0.90, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.68) but increasing it in 2019 (aOR 2.10, 95% CI 0.90 to 4.92). CONCLUSION: The study reports an alarming increase in Liberia's perinatal mortality from 2013 to 2019-2020. The findings show dynamic risk factors necessitating adaptable healthcare approaches, particularly during antenatal care. These adaptable approaches are crucial for refining health strategies in line with the Sustainable Development Goals, with emphasis on the integration of health, education, gender equality, sustainable livelihoods and global partnerships for effective health outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Muerte Perinatal , Mortalidad Perinatal , Lactante , Niño , Embarazo , Femenino , Humanos , Liberia/epidemiología , Parto , Mortinato , Mortalidad del Niño , Encuestas Epidemiológicas
5.
Nurse Educ Today ; 136: 106135, 2024 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38387212

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the perinatal death experience of midwifery students during clinical practice and their coping methods. DESIGN: A qualitative, descriptive, phenomenological design was used. SETTINGS: The study was conducted with midwifery students. PARTICIPANTS: The study was conducted with 14 midwifery students at a state university in northern Turkey between April and July 2023. METHODS: Perinatal death experiences that students witnessed during clinical practice and their coping methods were analyzed using the individual in-depth interview technique. Data were analyzed using the thematic analysis method. The results obtained from the study were reported according to the COREQ criteria. FINDINGS: As a result of the analysis, four main themes: (1) the perception of the concept of death, (2) the first encounter with death, (3) methods of coping with death, and (4) students' suggestions were elicited from the data. Students who witnessed perinatal death were affected by this situation, experienced negative emotions, and resorted to different methods to cope with their negative feelings about death. CONCLUSIONS: Midwifery students who witnessed perinatal death were negatively affected emotionally and professionally; therefore, education and policy-oriented regulations are needed to cope with perinatal death.


Asunto(s)
Partería , Muerte Perinatal , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Femenino , Embarazo , Humanos , Partería/educación , Investigación Cualitativa , Habilidades de Afrontamiento , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología
6.
Health Serv Res ; 59(1): e14222, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37691323

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assess key birth outcomes in an alternative maternity care model, midwifery-based birth center care. DATA SOURCES: The American Association of Birth Centers Perinatal Data Registry and birth certificate files, using national data collected from 2009 to 2019. STUDY DESIGN: This observational cohort study compared key clinical birth outcomes of women at low risk for perinatal complications, comparing those who received care in the midwifery-based birth center model versus hospital-based usual care. Linear regression analysis was used to assess key clinical outcomes in the midwifery-based group as compared with hospital-based usual care. The hospital-based group was selected using nearest neighbor matching, and the primary linear regressions were weighted using propensity score weights (PSWs). The key clinical outcomes considered were cesarean delivery, low birth weight, neonatal intensive care unit admission, breastfeeding, and neonatal death. We performed sensitivity analyses using inverse probability weights and entropy balancing weights. We also assessed the remaining role of omitted variable bias using a bounding methodology. DATA COLLECTION: Women aged 16-45 with low-risk pregnancies, defined as a singleton fetus and no record of hypertension or cesarean section, were included. The sample was selected for records that overlapped in each year and state. Counties were included if there were at least 50 midwifery-based birth center births and 300 total births. After matching, the sample size of the birth center cohort was 85,842 and the hospital-based cohort was 261,439. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Women receiving midwifery-based birth center care experienced lower rates of cesarean section (-12.2 percentage points, p < 0.001), low birth weight (-3.2 percentage points, p < 0.001), NICU admission (-5.5 percentage points, p < 0.001), neonatal death (-0.1 percentage points, p < 0.001), and higher rates of breastfeeding (9.3 percentage points, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This analysis supports midwifery-based birth center care as a high-quality model that delivers optimal outcomes for low-risk maternal/newborn dyads.


Asunto(s)
Centros de Asistencia al Embarazo y al Parto , Servicios de Salud Materna , Partería , Muerte Perinatal , Recién Nacido , Embarazo , Femenino , Humanos , Partería/métodos , Cesárea
7.
Afr J Reprod Health ; 27(11): 99-125, 2023 Nov 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38053339

RESUMEN

We compare the hematocrit, hemoglobin, need for transfusion, recurrent phototherapy, serum bilirubin level, and serum ferritin at different time frames for the umbilical cord milking (UCM) and delayed cord clamping (DCC) in both full-term and preterm infants. A comprehensive search through various databases aimed to compare UCM and DCC studies until May 2nd, 2023. Cochrane and NIH tools assessed RCTs and cohorts, respectively. Meta-analysis employed Review Manager 5.4 software, calculating MD and RR with 95% CIs for continuous and dichotomous data. We included 20 studies with a total of 5189 infants. Regarding preterm infants, hematocrit level showed no significant difference between intact Umbilical Cord Milking (iUCM) compared to DCC (MD = -0.24, 95% CI [-1.11, 0.64]). Moreover, Neonatal death incidence was significantly higher with the UCM technique in comparison to DCC (RR = 1.28, 95% CI [1.01 to 1.62]). Regarding term and late preterm infants, Hematocrit level showed no significant difference between the iUCM or cUCM techniques compared to DCC (MD = 0.21, 95% CI [-1.28 to 1.69]), (MD = 0.96, 95% CI [-1.02 to 2.95]), respectively. UCM led to a higher risk of neonatal death in preterm infants compared to DCC. However, the incidence of polycythemia was lower in the UCM group. Additionally, UCM was associated with higher rates of severe IVH events. Based on these findings, DCC may be preferred due to its lower incidence of severe IVH and neonatal death.


Nous comparons l'hématocrite, l'hémoglobine, le besoin de transfusion, la photothérapie récurrente, le taux de bilirubine sérique et la ferritine sérique à différentes périodes pour la traite du cordon ombilical (UCM) et le clampage retardé du cordon (DCC) chez les nourrissons nés à terme et prématurés. Une recherche complète dans diverses bases de données visait à comparer les études UCM et DCC jusqu'au 2 mai 2023. Les outils Cochrane et NIH ont évalué les ECR et les cohortes, respectivement. La méta-analyse a utilisé le logiciel Review Manager 5.4, calculant le MD et le RR avec des IC à 95 % pour les données continues et dichotomiques. Nous avons inclus 20 études portant sur un total de 5 189 nourrissons. Concernant les nourrissons prématurés, le niveau d'hématocrite n'a montré aucune différence significative entre la traite du cordon ombilical intact (iUCM) et la DCC (DM = -0,24, IC à 95 % [-1,11, 0,64]). De plus, l'incidence des décès néonatals était significativement plus élevée avec la technique UCM qu'avec la technique DCC (RR = 1,28, IC à 95 % [1,01 à 1,62]). Concernant les nourrissons à terme et peu prématurés, le niveau = 0,21, IC à 95 % [-1,28 à 1,69]), (DM = 0,96, IC à 95 % [-1,02 à 2,95]), respectivement. L'UCM a entraîné un risque plus élevé de décès néonatal chez les nourrissons prématurés par rapport au DCC. Cependant, l'incidence de la polyglobulie était plus faible dans le groupe UCM. De plus, l'UCM était associée à des taux plus élevés d'événements IVH graves. Sur la base de ces résultats, le DCC peut être préféré en raison de sa plus faible incidence d'IVH grave et de décès néonatals. d'hématocrite n'a montré aucune différence significative entre les techniques iUCM ou cUCM par rapport à la technique DCC (DM.


Asunto(s)
Recien Nacido Prematuro , Muerte Perinatal , Lactante , Embarazo , Femenino , Recién Nacido , Humanos , Clampeo del Cordón Umbilical , Cordón Umbilical , Hematócrito
8.
Lancet ; 401(10389): 1733-1744, 2023 05 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37167988

RESUMEN

A package of care for all pregnant women within eight scheduled antenatal care contacts is recommended by WHO. Some interventions for reducing and managing the outcomes for small vulnerable newborns (SVNs) exist within the WHO package and need to be more fully implemented, but additional effective measures are needed. We summarise evidence-based antenatal and intrapartum interventions (up to and including clamping the umbilical cord) to prevent vulnerable births or improve outcomes, informed by systematic reviews. We estimate, using the Lives Saved Tool, that eight proven preventive interventions (multiple micronutrient supplementation, balanced protein and energy supplementation, low-dose aspirin, progesterone provided vaginally, education for smoking cessation, malaria prevention, treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria, and treatment of syphilis), if fully implemented in 81 low-income and middle-income countries, could prevent 5·202 million SVN births (sensitivity bounds 2·398-7·903) and 0·566 million stillbirths (0·208-0·754) per year. These interventions, along with two that can reduce the complications of preterm (<37 weeks' gestation) births (antenatal corticosteroids and delayed cord clamping), could avert 0·476 million neonatal deaths (0·181-0·676) per year. If further research substantiates the preventive effect of three additional interventions (supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, and zinc) on SVN births, about 8·369 million SVN births (2·398-13·857) and 0·652 million neonatal deaths (0·181-0·917) could be avoided per year. Scaling up the eight proven interventions and two intrapartum interventions would cost about US$1·1 billion in 2030 and the potential interventions would cost an additional $3·0 billion. Implementation of antenatal care recommendations is urgent and should include all interventions that have proven effects on SVN babies, within the context of access to family planning services and addressing social determinants of health. Attaining high effective coverage with these interventions will be necessary to achieve global targets for the reduction of low birthweight births and neonatal mortality, and long-term benefits on growth and human capital.


Asunto(s)
Muerte Perinatal , Lactante , Embarazo , Recién Nacido , Femenino , Humanos , Incidencia , Atención Prenatal , Mortinato , Parto
9.
Neonatology ; 120(4): 491-499, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37231868

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3.2 aims for every country to reach a neonatal mortality rate (NMR) of ≤12/1,000 live births by 2030. More than 60 countries are off track, and 2.3 million newborns still die each year. Urgent action is needed, but varies by context, notably mortality level. METHODS: We applied a five-phase NMR transition model based on national analyses for 195 UN member states: I (NMR >45), II (30-<45), III (15-<30), IV (5-<15), and V (<5). We analyzed data over the last century from selected countries to inform strategies to reach SDG3.2. We also undertook impact analyses for packages of care using the Lives Saved Tool software. RESULTS: An NMR of <15/1,000 requires firstly wide-scale access to maternity care and hospital care for small and sick newborns, including skilled nurses and doctors, safe oxygen use, and respiratory support, such as CPAP. Neonatal mortality could be reduced to the SDG target of ≤12/1,000 with further scale-up of small and sick newborn care. To reduce neonatal mortality further, more investment is required in infrastructure, device bundles (e.g., phototherapy, ventilation), and careful attention to infection prevention. To reach phase V (NMR <5), which is closer to ending preventable newborn deaths, additional technologies and therapies such as mechanical ventilation and surfactant replacement therapy are needed, as well as higher staffing ratios. CONCLUSIONS: Learning from high-income country is important, including what not to do. Introduction of new technologies should be according to the country's phase. Early focus on disability-free survival and family involvement is also crucial.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Materna , Muerte Perinatal , Recién Nacido , Humanos , Femenino , Embarazo , Desarrollo Sostenible , Mortalidad Infantil , Recursos Humanos
10.
BJOG ; 130(10): 1247-1257, 2023 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37017148

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To develop a core outcome set for pregnancy nutrition. DESIGN: Mixed-methods core outcome set development study. SETTING: Online. POPULATION: Healthcare professionals, researchers and women with experience of pregnancy. METHODS: Candidate outcomes were identified from a systematic review of intervention and observational studies. One-to-one semi-structured interviews with women with experience of pregnancy (n = 26) were transcribed and analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Outcomes were consolidated, organised into domains and categorised using the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials taxonomy. A two-round, modified Delphi survey (May-August 2021) was conducted. Participants voted on how critical each outcome was to include using a nine-point Likert scale. All outcomes that did not reach consensus were discussed at a consensus meeting. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Critical outcomes to include in the core outcome set. RESULTS: A total of 53 091 articles were identified. Outcomes were extracted from 427 articles. The qualitative data yielded 45 outcomes. An additional 24 outcomes came from the literature. In round one, 82 participants ranked 30 outcomes. One new outcome was included in round two, during which participants (n = 60) voted 12/31 outcomes as critical to include. The remaining 20 outcomes were discussed at the consensus meeting and two outcomes were included. Maternal outcomes included: pregnancy complications; delivery complications; maternal wellbeing; gestational weight change; maternal vitamin and mineral status; mental health; diet quality; nutritional intakes; need for treatments, interventions, medications and supplements; pregnancy loss or perinatal death; birth defects or congenital anomalies; neonatal complications; and newborn anthropometry and body composition. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the Pregnancy Nutrition Core Outcome Set (PRENCOS) will ensure researchers measure what matters most from the perspective of key stakeholders.


Asunto(s)
Muerte Perinatal , Complicaciones del Embarazo , Recién Nacido , Embarazo , Femenino , Humanos , Fenómenos Fisiologicos de la Nutrición Prenatal , Resultado del Embarazo , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud , Complicaciones del Embarazo/terapia , Proyectos de Investigación , Técnica Delphi , Resultado del Tratamiento
12.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 2: CD011507, 2023 02 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36790138

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Gestational diabetes with onset or first recognition during pregnancy is an increasing problem worldwide. Myo-inositol, an isomer of inositol, is a naturally occurring sugar commonly found in cereals, corn, legumes and meat. Myo-inositol is one of the intracellular mediators of the insulin signal and correlates with insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. The potential beneficial effect of improving insulin sensitivity suggests that myo-inositol may be useful for women in preventing gestational diabetes. This is an update of a review first published in 2015. OBJECTIVES: To assess if antenatal dietary supplementation with myo-inositol is safe and effective, for the mother and fetus, in preventing gestational diabetes. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO ICTRP (17 March 2022) and the reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including cluster-RCTs and conference abstracts, assessing the effects of myo-inositol for the prevention of gestational diabetes in pregnant women. We included studies that compared any dose of myo-inositol, alone or in a combination preparation, with no treatment, placebo or another intervention. Quasi-randomised and cross-over trials were not eligible. We excluded women with pre-existing type 1 or type 2 diabetes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and extracted the data. We checked the data for accuracy. We assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. MAIN RESULTS: We included seven RCTs (one conducted in Ireland, six conducted in Italy) reporting on 1319 women who were 10 weeks to 24 weeks pregnant at the start of the studies. The studies had relatively small sample sizes and the overall risk of bias was low. For the primary maternal outcomes, meta-analysis showed that myo-inositol may reduce the incidence of gestational diabetes (risk ratio (RR) 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31 to 0.90; 6 studies, 1140 women) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.61; 5 studies, 1052 women). However, the certainty of the evidence was low to very low. For the primary neonatal outcomes, only one study measured the risk of a large-for-gestational-age infant and found myo-inositol was associated with both appreciable benefit and harm (RR 1.40, 95% CI 0.65 to 3.02; 1 study, 234 infants; low-certainty evidence). None of the included studies reported on the other primary neonatal outcomes (perinatal mortality, mortality or morbidity composite). For the secondary maternal outcomes, we are unclear about the effect of myo-inositol on weight gain during pregnancy (mean difference (MD) -0.25 kilogram (kg), 95% CI -1.26 to 0.75 kg; 4 studies, 831 women) and perineal trauma (RR 4.0, 95% CI 0.45 to 35.25; 1 study, 234 women) because the evidence was assessed as being very low-certainty. Further, myo-inositol may result in little to no difference in caesarean section (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.07; 4 studies, 829 women; low-certainty evidence). None of the included studies reported on the other secondary maternal outcomes (postnatal depression and the development of subsequent type 2 diabetes mellitus). For the secondary neonatal outcomes, meta-analysis showed no neonatal hypoglycaemia (RR 3.07, 95% CI 0.90 to 10.52; 4 studies; 671 infants; very low-certainty evidence). However, myo-inositol may be associated with a reduction in the incidence of preterm birth (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.70; 4 studies; 829 infants). There were insufficient data for a number of maternal and neonatal secondary outcomes, and no data were reported for any of the long-term childhood or adulthood outcomes, or for health service utilisation outcomes. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from seven studies shows that antenatal dietary supplementation with myo-inositol during pregnancy may reduce the incidence of gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth. Limited data suggest that supplementation with myo-inositol may not reduce the risk of a large-for-gestational-age infant.  The current evidence is based on small studies that were not powered to detect differences in outcomes such as perinatal mortality and serious infant morbidity. Six of the included studies were conducted in Italy and one in Ireland, which raises concerns about the lack of generalisability to other settings. There is evidence of inconsistency among doses of myo-inositol, the timing of administration and study population. As a result, we downgraded the certainty of the evidence for many outcomes to low or very low certainty. Further studies for this promising antenatal intervention for preventing gestational diabetes are encouraged and should include pregnant women of different ethnicities and varying risk factors. Myo-inositol at different doses, frequency and timing of administration, should be compared with placebo, diet and exercise, and pharmacological interventions. Long-term follow-up should be considered and outcomes should include potential harms, including adverse effects.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Diabetes Gestacional , Hipertensión Inducida en el Embarazo , Resistencia a la Insulina , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Embarazo , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/prevención & control , Diabetes Gestacional/prevención & control , Diabetes Gestacional/terapia , Suplementos Dietéticos , Inositol/uso terapéutico , Muerte Perinatal , Nacimiento Prematuro
13.
Diabetologia ; 66(5): 826-836, 2023 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36640191

RESUMEN

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump is often superior in improving glycaemic control compared with conventional multiple daily insulin injection (MDI). However, whether pump treatment leads to improved pregnancy outcomes in terms of congenital malformations and perinatal death remains unknown. The present aim was to evaluate the risk of malformations and perinatal and neonatal death in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes treated with pump or MDI. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective multinational cohort of 2088 pregnant women with type 1 diabetes in a real-world setting who were treated by pump (n=750) or MDI (n=1338). ORs for offspring with congenital malformations or perinatal or neonatal death were calculated using crude data and by logistic regression on propensity score-matched data. RESULTS: At enrolment (gestational week 8; 95% CI 4, 14), pump users had a higher educational level (university degree: 37.3% vs 25.1%; p<0.001) and better glycaemic control (mean HbA1c: 51±10 mmol/mol [6.8±0.9%] vs 54±14 mmol/mol [7.1±1.3%], p<0.001) compared with MDI users. Moreover, a greater proportion of pump users had an HbA1c level below 75 mmol/mol (9%) (97.6% vs 91.9%, p<0.001), and more often reported taking folic acid supplementation (86.3% vs 74.8%; p<0.001) compared with MDI users. All clinically important potential confounders were balanced after propensity score matching, and HbA1c remained lower in pump users. The proportion of fetuses with at least one malformation was 13.5% in pump users vs 11.2% in MDI users (crude OR 1.23; 95% CI 0.94, 1.61; p=0.13; propensity score-matched (adjusted) OR 1.11; 95% CI 0.81, 1.52; p=0.52). The proportion of fetuses with at least one major malformation was 2.8% in pump users vs 3.1% in MDI users (crude OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.52, 1.51; p=0.66; adjusted OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.42, 1.45; p=0.43), and the proportions of fetuses carrying one or more minor malformations (but no major malformations) were 10.7% vs 8.1% (crude OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.00, 1.84; p=0.05; adjusted OR 1.23; 95% CI 0.87, 1.75; p=0.25). The proportions of perinatal and neonatal death were 1.6% vs 1.3% (crude OR 1.23; 95% CI 0.57, 2.67; p=0.59; adjusted OR 2.02; 95% CI 0.69, 5.93; p=0.20) and 0.3% vs 0.3% (n=2 vs n=4, p=not applicable), respectively. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS: Insulin pump treatment was not associated with a lower risk of congenital malformations, despite better glycaemic control in early pregnancy compared with MDI. Further studies exploring the efficacy and safety of pump treatment during pregnancy are needed.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1 , Muerte Perinatal , Recién Nacido , Humanos , Femenino , Embarazo , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/tratamiento farmacológico , Estudios Prospectivos , Hemoglobina Glucada , Insulina/uso terapéutico , Sistemas de Infusión de Insulina , Hipoglucemiantes/uso terapéutico , Inyecciones Subcutáneas
14.
J Adv Nurs ; 79(3): 910-921, 2023 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36695342

RESUMEN

AIM: The aim of this paper is to describe the strategies used by nurses and midwives to cope with experiences of dealing with perinatal death and maintain their satisfaction at work. DESIGN: Systematic literature review, in accordance with the PRISMA Declaration. DATA SOURCES: (2000-2021) Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, CINALH and Dialnet, for articles in English and Spanish from the period between January 2000 and March 2021. REVIEW METHODS: The outcome of the review was the perceptions of nurses and midwives who have cared for people in a situation of perinatal loss. RESULTS: Thirteen studies were identified that evaluated the attitudes, experiences and needs of these healthcare professionals. The combined size of all samples was 2196 participants. CONCLUSIONS: The negative effects on these professionals' satisfaction with their situation at work could be mitigated by covering their needs for knowledge, experience, and emotional and technical skills to deal with such events. IMPACT: As potential protective factors against dissatisfaction in nurses and midwives during perinatal death experiences, we identified older age and experience in perinatal care and coping strategies based on communicating one's feelings to peers, empathetic listening to the families cared for, training and institutional support. No Patient or Public Contribution.


Asunto(s)
Partería , Enfermeras y Enfermeros , Muerte Perinatal , Embarazo , Femenino , Humanos , Parto , Personal de Salud
15.
PLoS One ; 17(12): e0277654, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36525409

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Maternal anemia is an ongoing public health challenge in low- and middle- income countries, including Bangladesh. The aim of this study was to explore the association of maternal anemia with a range of adverse maternal health and birth outcomes in Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 2,259 maternal women data was analyzed, extracted from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. Outcome variables considered were a range of maternal health and birth outcomes. Adverse maternal health outcomes were pregnancy complications, pregnancy termination, menstrual irregularities, cesarean delivery, diabetes, and hypertension. Adverse birth outcomes considered were low birth weight, stillbirths, early neonatal deaths, perinatal deaths, preterm birth, and prolonged labor. The main exposure variable was maternal anemia status. Mixed effect multilevel logistic/poisson regression model was used to determine the association between exposure and outcome variable adjusted for individual-, household-, and community-level factors. RESULTS: The reported prevalence of anemia was 44%. A higher likelihoods pregnancy complication (AOR, 1.39, 95% CI, 1.09-2.41, p<0.05) and lower likelihoods of menstrual irregularities (AOR, 0.79, 95% CI, 0.58-0.94, p<0.05), diabetes (AOR, 0.78, 95% CI, 0.49-0.98, p<0.05) and hypertensive (AOR, 0.79, 95% CI, 0.60-0.96, p<0.05) were found among anemic maternal women as compared to the non-anemic maternal women. Adverse birth outcomes, including preterm birth (AOR, 2.03, 95% CI, 1.01-4.25, p<0.05), early neonatal mortality (AOR, 1.87, 95% CI, 1.06-5.10), and perinatal mortality (AOR, 1.54, 95% CI, 1.09-3.52, p<0.05), were also found higher among newborn of anemic maternal women as compared to the newborn of non-anemic maternal women. CONCLUSION: Anemia during pregnancy increases the occurrence of adverse maternal health and birth outcomes. Strategies to reduce anemia, such as iron supplementation, during pregnancy and among reproductive-aged women need to be prioritized in the policies and programs.


Asunto(s)
Anemia , Muerte Perinatal , Complicaciones del Embarazo , Nacimiento Prematuro , Embarazo , Recién Nacido , Femenino , Humanos , Adulto , Nacimiento Prematuro/epidemiología , Nacimiento Prematuro/etiología , Salud Materna , Bangladesh/epidemiología , Factores de Riesgo , Anemia/complicaciones , Anemia/epidemiología , Complicaciones del Embarazo/epidemiología , Prevalencia , Trastornos de la Menstruación/complicaciones , Resultado del Embarazo
16.
Reprod Health ; 19(1): 200, 2022 Oct 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36209163

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Globally, around 4 million babies die within the first month of birth annually with more than 3 million stillbirths. Of them, 99% of newborn deaths and 98% of stillbirths occur in developing countries. Despite giving priority to maternal health services, adverse birth outcomes are still major public health problems in the study area. Hence, a continuum of care (CoC) is a core key strategy to overcome those challenges. The study conducted on the effectiveness of continuum of care in maternal health services was scarce in developing countries and not done in the study area. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of continuum of care and determinants of adverse birth outcomes. METHODS: Community and health facility-linked prospective follow-up study designs were employed from March 2020 to January 2021 in Northwestern Ethiopia. A multistage clustered sampling technique was used to recruit 2198 pregnant women. Data were collected by using a semi-structured and pretested questionnaire. Collected data were coded, entered, cleaned, and analyzed by STATA 14. Multilevel logistic regression model was used to identify community and individual-level factors. Finally, propensity score matching was applied to determine the effectiveness of continuum of care. RESULTS: The magnitude of adverse birth outcomes was 12.4% (95% CI 12.2-12.7): stillbirth (2.8%; 95% CI 2.7-3.0), neonatal mortality (3.1%; 95% CI 2.9-3.2), and neonatal morbidity (6.8%; 95% CI 6.6-7.0). Risk factors were poor household wealth (AOR = 3.3; 95% CI 1.07-10.23), pregnant-related maternal complications during pregnancy (AOR = 3.29; 95% CI 1.68-6.46), childbirth (AOR = 6.08; 95% CI 2.36-15.48), after childbirth (AOR = 5.24; 95% CI 2.23-12.33), an offensive odor of amniotic fluid (AOR = 3.04; 95% CI 1.37-6.75) and history of stillbirth (AOR = 4.2; 95% CI 1.78-9.93). Whereas, receiving iron-folic acid (AOR = 0.44; 95% CI 0.14-0.98), initiating breastfeeding within 1 h (AOR = 0.22; 95% CI 0.10-0.50) and immunizing newborn (AOR = 0.33; 95% CI 0.12-0.93) were protective factors. As treatment effect, completion of continuum of care via time dimension (ß = - 0.03; 95% CI - 0.05, - 0.01) and space dimension (ß = - 0.03; 95% CI - 0.04, - 0.01) were significantly reduce perinatal death. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse birth outcomes were high as compared with national targets. Completion of continuum of care is an effective intervention for reducing perinatal death. Efforts should be made to strengthen the continuum of care in maternal health services, iron supplementation, immunizing and early initiation of breastfeeding.


Adverse birth outcomes are a major public health problem and a big challenge in Ethiopia, particularly in the study area. They encompass stillbirth, neonatal death, and neonatal illness within 28 days after birth. Globally, about 4 million babies die within the first month of birth annually with more than 3 million stillbirths. Of these, about 99% of newborn deaths and 98% of stillbirths occur in developing countries. As a solution to overcome those problems, a continuum of care in maternal health services is a core strategy. Therefore, this study was planned to determine how effective continuum of care in maternal health service is in reducing perinatal death and factors contributing to the adverse birth outcomes. In this study, 2198 pregnant women were recruited and followed for 11 months. The health condition of women was frequently assessed and recorded during pregnancy, childbirth and the period until 42 days after childbirth, as well as the health condition of the babies until 28 days after the birth, the package of maternal health services received, and adverse birth outcomes. Among the 2198 pregnant women enrolled in the study, 248 women encountered adverse birth outcomes (52 had stillbirths, 58 had neonatal death and 138 had neonatal illness). Risk factors of adverse birth outcomes were a poor household wealth index quintile, pregnancy-related maternal complications, offensive odor amniotic fluid, and history of stillbirth. On the other hand, protective interventions against adverse birth outcomes were receiving iron supplementation during pregnancy, initiating breastfeeding within 1 h, and immunizing the newborn. Moreover, completions of continuum of care in maternal health services via time and space dimensions reduced perinatal death. In conclusion, neonatal and perinatal deaths were high in the study areas. Completions of continuum of care in maternal health services via time and space dimensions reduced perinatal death, neonatal death, and stillbirth. The results of this study can inform national health policymakers, maternal and child programmers, and other stakeholders to prioritize and strengthen protective intervention and continuum of care in maternal health services.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Materna , Muerte Perinatal , Complicaciones del Embarazo , Continuidad de la Atención al Paciente , Etiopía/epidemiología , Femenino , Ácido Fólico , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Hierro , Embarazo , Estudios Prospectivos , Mortinato/epidemiología
17.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 634, 2022 Aug 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35948884

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Around 1 in 150 babies are stillborn or die in the first month of life in the UK. Most women conceive again, and subsequent pregnancies are often characterised by feelings of stress and anxiety, persisting beyond the birth. Psychological distress increases the risk of poor pregnancy outcomes and longer-term parenting difficulties. Appropriate emotional support in subsequent pregnancies is key to ensure the wellbeing of women and families. Substantial variability in existing care has been reported, including fragmentation and poor communication. A new care package improving midwifery continuity and access to emotional support during subsequent pregnancy could improve outcomes. However, no study has assessed the feasibility of a full-scale trial to test effectiveness in improving outcomes and cost-effectiveness for the National Health Service (NHS). METHODS: A prospective, mixed-methods pre-and post-cohort study, in two Northwest England Maternity Units. Thirty-eight women, (≤ 20 weeks' gestation, with a previous stillbirth, or neonatal death) were offered the study intervention (allocation of a named midwife care coordinator and access to group and online support). Sixteen women receiving usual care were recruited in the 6 months preceding implementation of the intervention. Outcome data were collected at 2 antenatal and 1 postnatal visit(s). Qualitative interviews captured experiences of care and research processes with women (n = 20), partners (n = 5), and midwives (n = 8). RESULTS: Overall recruitment was 90% of target, and 77% of women completed the study. A diverse sample reflected the local population, but non-English speaking was a barrier to participation. Study processes and data collection methods were acceptable. Those who received increased midwifery continuity valued the relationship with the care coordinator and perceived positive impacts on pregnancy experiences. However, the anticipated increase in antenatal continuity for direct midwife contacts was not observed for the intervention group. Take-up of in-person support groups was also limited. CONCLUSIONS: Women and partners welcomed the opportunity to participate in research. Continuity of midwifery care was supported as a beneficial strategy to improve care and support in pregnancy after the death of a baby by both parents and professionals. Important barriers to implementation included changes in leadership, service pressures and competing priorities. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN17447733 first registration 13/02/2018.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Materna , Partería , Muerte Perinatal , Estudios de Cohortes , Vías Clínicas , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Recién Nacido , Partería/métodos , Muerte Perinatal/prevención & control , Embarazo , Atención Prenatal/métodos , Estudios Prospectivos , Medicina Estatal , Mortinato/psicología
18.
Ann Epidemiol ; 75: 1-8, 2022 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36028147

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: to directly compare the risk of neonatal death between traditional birth attendant (TBA)-assisted and unassisted deliveries in Nigeria. METHODS: Using data on live births from the 2008, 2013, and 2018 Nigeria Demographic and Health Surveys, this cross-sectional study compared risk of neonatal death for TBA-assisted versus unassisted births. We used survey-featured logistic regression to estimate the odds of neonatal death. Survey year-stratified and propensity score-matched (PSM) estimates were obtained. Multivariate imputation by chained equation (MICE) for missing data was conducted. RESULTS: A total of 28, 922 births were included. Regression and PSM analysis of pooled data showed that unassisted births had lower odds of neonatal death compared to TBA-assisted births, (aOR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.65,1.00) and (aOR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64,1.00), respectively. Regression analysis by survey year yielded non-significant higher odds of neonatal death for TBA-assisted births. Pooled estimates from MICE showed non-significant higher odds of death for TBA-assisted births. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that birth care by TBAs do not necessarily lead to better neonatal survival. Jurisdictions seeking to allow continued operation of TBAs need to consider measures such as training, supervision, and regulation to ensure the safety of newborns.


Asunto(s)
Partería , Muerte Perinatal , Embarazo , Femenino , Humanos , Nigeria/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Parto , Mortalidad Infantil
19.
Ethiop J Health Sci ; 32(3): 513-522, 2022 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35813672

RESUMEN

Background: Despite a global decline in under-five deaths, the neonatal mortality rate remains slow in developing countries and birth asphyxia remains the third cause of neonatal deaths. Globally, neonatal deaths accounts for 45% of under-five deaths, birth asphyxia causes 23-40% of neonatal deaths in Ethiopia. There is limited data on risk factors of asphyxia in Ethiopia, particularly in the study area. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the risk factors of birth asphyxia among newborns. Methods: This research followed a hospital-based unmatched case-control study design at Debre Markos comprehensive specialized referral hospital, Northwest Ethiopia, among 372 newborns (124 cases and 248 controls). Data were collected by interviewing index mothers and chart review using a pre-tested questionnaire. Then it was entered in Epi-data version 3.1 and transferred to STATA version 14.0 for analysis. Bivariate and multiple variable logistic regression were carried out to the possible risk factors. Finally, statistical significance was declared using adjusted odds ratio with 95% CI and p-value <0.05. Results: Prolonged labor >12, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, assisted vaginal delivery, gestational age < 37 weeks, noncephalic presentation, comorbidity, birthweight<2500grams were found to be significant factors of birth asphyxia. Conclusion: In this study, Prolonged labor >12 hours, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, assisted vaginal delivery, gestational age < 37 weeks, non-cephalic presentation comorbidity, fetal distress, birthweight<2500grams were found to be risk factors of birth asphyxia were risk factors of birth asphyxia. Therefore, to reduce neonatal mortality associated with birth asphyxia, attention should be given to holistic pregnancy, labor and delivery care, and post-natal care. Moreover, interventions aimed at reducing birth asphyxia should target the identified factors.


Asunto(s)
Asfixia Neonatal , Muerte Perinatal , Asfixia/epidemiología , Asfixia/etiología , Asfixia Neonatal/epidemiología , Asfixia Neonatal/etiología , Peso al Nacer , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Etiopía/epidemiología , Femenino , Hospitales Especializados , Humanos , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Embarazo , Derivación y Consulta , Factores de Riesgo
20.
Asian Nurs Res (Korean Soc Nurs Sci) ; 16(3): 180-186, 2022 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35716897

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The aim of this paper is to develop a scale for measuring the perinatal bereavement care competence of midwives and assess its psychometric properties. METHODS: The Perinatal Bereavement Care Competence Scale was developed in four phases. (1) Item generation: 75 items were formulated based on a literature review and interviews with midwives. (2) Delphi expert consultation: 15 experts evaluated whether the items were clear/appropriate/relevant to the questionnaire dimensions, and the items were optimized. (3) Pilot test: The comprehensibility, acceptability, and time required to complete the questionnaire by midwives were assessed. (4) Evaluation of reliability and validity: The scale was validated by initial item analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, and internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability. RESULTS: The final scale consisted of six dimensions and 25 items: maintaining belief (three items), knowing (four items), being with (six items), preserving dignity (four items), enabling (five items), and self-adjustment (three items). Exploratory factor analysis yielded a six-factor structure that was consistent with the theoretical framework and explained 70.8% of the total variance. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated a good fit for the six-factor model. Cronbach's α for the scale was 0.931, and the test-retest reliability coefficient was 0.968. CONCLUSION: The Perinatal Bereavement Care Competence Scale is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring the competence of midwives in caring for bereaved parents who have experienced perinatal loss.


Asunto(s)
Pesar , Partería , Competencia Profesional , Psicometría , Aflicción , Análisis Factorial , Femenino , Humanos , Muerte Perinatal , Embarazo , Competencia Profesional/normas , Psicometría/instrumentación , Psicometría/métodos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
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